Special Issue "Mangrove Ecology and Conservation"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Martin Zimmer

Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research, Bremen, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: tropical coastal ecosystems; mangrove ecology; ecosystem processes; ecosystem services; decomposition and element fluxes; interspecific interactions; sediment dyanmics; community composition; species distribution; knowledge-based conservation and restoration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Mangroves provide numerous ecosystem services, both to local communities and to mankind worldwide. Despite their undisputed value, however, mangroves are threatened by area loss-rates that range far above those of other tropical forests. Hence, the importance of (international) mangrove conservation projects cannot be over-estimated, and the implementation of marine protected area networks that encompass mangroves should become a priority on the agendas of regional and national policy- and decision-makers in tropical countries. However, efficient conservation requires sound knowledge about the system to be managed rather than making decisions based on gut-feelings. Thus, mangrove conservation and its underlying applied research of social-ecological systems and socio-economics should go hand-in-hand with fundamental research on mangrove ecology. This Special Issue aims at highlighting and showcasing both new findings and significant advances in fundamental mangrove ecology and novel approaches and case-studies in mangrove conservation and management.

Prof. Martin Zimmer
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mangrove
  • Ecology
  • Conservation
  • Management
  • Ecosystem Services
  • Social-Ecological Systems

Published Papers (5 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-5
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Assessing Genetic Diversity after Mangrove Restoration in Brazil: Why Is It So Important?
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020027
Received: 11 February 2018 / Revised: 28 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
PDF Full-text (2330 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Vital for many marine and terrestrial species, and several other environmental services, such as carbon sink areas, the mangrove ecosystem is highly threatened due to the proximity of large urban centers and climate change. The forced fragmentation of this ecosystem affects the genetic
[...] Read more.
Vital for many marine and terrestrial species, and several other environmental services, such as carbon sink areas, the mangrove ecosystem is highly threatened due to the proximity of large urban centers and climate change. The forced fragmentation of this ecosystem affects the genetic diversity distribution among natural populations. Moreover, while restoration efforts have increased, few studies have analyzed how recently-planted areas impact the original mangrove genetic diversity. We analyzed the genetic diversity of two mangroves species (Laguncularia racemosa and Avicennia schaueriana) in three areas in Brazil, using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Using the local approach, we identified the genetic diversity pool of a restored area compared to nearby areas, including the remnant plants inside the restored area, one well-conserved population at the shore of Guanabara Bay, and one impacted population in Araçá Bay. The results for L. racemosa showed that the introduced population has lost genetic diversity by drift, but remnant plants with high genetic diversity or incoming propagules could help improve overall genetic diversity. Avicennia schaueriana showed similar genetic diversity, indicating an efficient gene flow. The principal component analysis showing different connections between both species indicate differences in gene flow and dispersal efficiencies, highlighting the needed for further studies. Our results emphasize that genetic diversity knowledge and monitoring associated with restoration actions can help avoid bottlenecks and other pitfalls, especially for the mangrove ecosystem. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mangrove Ecology and Conservation)
Figures

Figure 1a

Open AccessArticle Significance of Mangrove Biodiversity Conservation in Fishery Production and Living Conditions of Coastal Communities in Sri Lanka
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020020
Received: 8 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 27 March 2018 / Published: 30 March 2018
PDF Full-text (9179 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Sri Lanka is an island nation where ~59% of the population live in coastal regions. The main income source in these areas is fishing, which contributes to ~44% of the national GDP. Fishery resources depend on mangroves, especially in estuaries and lagoons, as
[...] Read more.
Sri Lanka is an island nation where ~59% of the population live in coastal regions. The main income source in these areas is fishing, which contributes to ~44% of the national GDP. Fishery resources depend on mangroves, especially in estuaries and lagoons, as mangroves provide the best nursery grounds for both brackish and marine species that are significant for the island’s fishing industry. However, growing pressures from an increasing population and development are causing substantial damage to mangroves resulting in loss of mangrove diversity. We analyzed whether variation in mangrove diversity within a lagoon system affects fishery production and livelihoods. Along the lagoon we selected three sites, which were 5 km apart from each other, for the survey. We used three 50 m long transects at each site for faunal and floral diversity assessments. The fishery catch was recorded from three crafts in each side. The socio-economic survey was conducted in 30 households per site using a standard questionnaire. In the site with the highest floral and faunal diversity, we also recorded the highest fish catch, but not the highest crab or shrimp catches. Our results confirm that higher mangrove diversity—and not just area—supports higher income generation. Thus, future development should prioritize biodiversity conservation in coastal regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mangrove Ecology and Conservation)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Nutrient Removal Efficiency of Rhizophora mangle (L.) Seedlings Exposed to Experimental Dumping of Municipal Waters
Diversity 2018, 10(1), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10010016
Received: 23 January 2018 / Revised: 11 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 March 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
PDF Full-text (3136 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Mangrove forests are conspicuous components of tropical wetlands that sustain continuous exposure to wastewater discharges commonly of municipal origins. Mangroves can remove nutrients from these waters to fulfill their nutrients demand, although the effects of continuous exposure are unknown. An experimental greenhouse imitating
[...] Read more.
Mangrove forests are conspicuous components of tropical wetlands that sustain continuous exposure to wastewater discharges commonly of municipal origins. Mangroves can remove nutrients from these waters to fulfill their nutrients demand, although the effects of continuous exposure are unknown. An experimental greenhouse imitating tidal regimes was built to measure the efficiency of mangrove seedlings to incorporate nutrients, growth and above biomass production when exposed to three periodic wastewater discharges. The experiment totaled 112 d. Nutrient removal by the exposed group, such as phosphates, ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (97%, 98.35%, 71.05%, 56.57% and 64.36%, respectively) was evident up to the second dumping. By the third dumping, all nutrient concentrations increased in the interstitial water, although significant evidence of removal by the plants was not obtained (p > 0.05). Nutrient concentrations in the control group did not change significantly throughout the experiment (p > 0.05). Treated plants increased two-fold in stem girth when compared to the control (p < 0.05), although control plants averaged higher heights (p < 0.05). Biomass of treated group increased up to 45% against 37% of the control during the duration of the experiment (p < 0.05). We suggest that nutrient removal efficiency of mangroves is linked to the maintenance of oxic conditions in the pore-water because of oxygen transference from their aerial to their subterranean radicular system that facilitates the oxidation of reduced nitrogen compounds and plants uptake. Nevertheless, continuous inflows of wastewater would lead to eutrophication, establishment of anoxic conditions in water and soil, and lessening of nutrient absorption of mangroves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mangrove Ecology and Conservation)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Ecophysiological Response of Rhizophora mangle to the Variation in Hydrochemistry during Five Years along the Coast of Campeche, México
Diversity 2018, 10(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10010009
Received: 6 November 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 3 February 2018
PDF Full-text (8354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We evaluated the phenological response and litterfall production of Rhizophora mangle to changes in pore water chemistry over a five-year period (from 2009 to 2014 and 2010 to 2016) along the coast of Campeche, México. Severe drought conditions were recorded in 2009 with
[...] Read more.
We evaluated the phenological response and litterfall production of Rhizophora mangle to changes in pore water chemistry over a five-year period (from 2009 to 2014 and 2010 to 2016) along the coast of Campeche, México. Severe drought conditions were recorded in 2009 with a Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) of −1.5 and again in 2015 with a SPI of −1.16). A precipitation deficit of 22.1% was recorded between 2009 and 2016 ranging from 9.5% in Laguna de Terminos in the south to 64.4% in Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve in the north. Precipitation varied significantly per year (p < 0.001), seasonally (p < 0.001), and between years and seasons (p < 0.001). An interaction was observed in the salinity (p < 0.05), redox potential (p < 0.001), and precipitation (p < 0.001) of the Laguna de Terminos, Rio Champoton, and Los Petenes Biosphere Reserve regions. Significant differences were found between the years in the leaf and propagule production (p < 0.001), and between seasons in production of leaves, flowers, and propagules (p < 0.001). The determining factor in the production of flowers during both the rainy and dry seasons was the salinity, and the determining factors for the production of propagules were the redox potential and salinity. The results of this study suggest a low phenotypic plasticity in R. mangle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mangrove Ecology and Conservation)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Better Resilient than Resistant—Regeneration Dynamics of Storm-Disturbed Mangrove Forests on the Bay Island of Guanaja (Honduras) during the First Two Decades after Hurricane Mitch (October 1998)
Diversity 2018, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10010008
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 24 January 2018 / Accepted: 25 January 2018 / Published: 27 January 2018
PDF Full-text (28154 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Located at the interface of land and sea, Caribbean mangroves frequently experience severe disturbances by hurricanes, but in most cases storm-impacted mangrove forests are able to regenerate. How exactly regeneration proceeds, however, is still a matter of debate: does—due to the specific site
[...] Read more.
Located at the interface of land and sea, Caribbean mangroves frequently experience severe disturbances by hurricanes, but in most cases storm-impacted mangrove forests are able to regenerate. How exactly regeneration proceeds, however, is still a matter of debate: does—due to the specific site conditions—regeneration follows a true auto-succession with exactly the same set of species driving regeneration that was present prior to the disturbance, or do different trajectories of regeneration exist? Considering the fundamental ecosystem services mangroves provide, a better understanding of their recovery is crucial. The Honduran island of Guanaja offers ideal settings for the study of regeneration dynamics of storm-impacted mangrove forests. The island was hit in October 1998 by Hurricane Mitch, one of the most intense Atlantic storms of the past century. Immediately after the storm, 97% of the mangroves were classified as dead. In 2005, long-term monitoring on the regeneration dynamics of the mangroves of the island was initiated, employing permanent line-transects at six different mangrove localities all around the island, which have been revisited in 2009 and 1016. Due to the pronounced topography of the island, different successional pathways emerge depending on the severity of the previous disturbance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mangrove Ecology and Conservation)
Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to Top