Special Issue "Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Fishes"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Diversity".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Catriona Clemmesen-Bockelmann

Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Fishes, GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: climate change effects on fish; ocean acidification; larval fish ecology; life history and recruitment studies; biochemical indicators of growth and condition; food web interactions; larval fish and zooplankton monitoring and time series

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Our oceans are changing as high levels of atmospheric CO2 dissolve into seawater and lower its pH, causing it to become more acidic. This adds to a list of pressures that are currently threatening marine fishes, including overfishing and marine pollution. While it is already known that ocean acidification can have damaging effects on marine organisms, including marine fishes, results are controversial—varying from no effect to positive or negative effects. These responses can be attributed to the differences in sensitivity of different species, their life stages, levels of stressors in relation to the natural environment, exposure times, food and energy availability and adaptation potential. Transferring experimental ocean acidification eco-physiological results to the population level, and trying to evaluate the impact on the food web, poses challenges, but a better evaluation of the impact of ocean acidification on marine fish and fisheries is needed.

The forthcoming Special Issue aims to provide an overview of recent topics dealing with the effects of ocean acidification and other climate stressors, individually or in a multi-stressor approach, on marine fishes from the tropical, temperate and polar seas, with an emphasis on reflecting on the diversity of impacts of ocean acidification. Papers will present current trends on short-term versus long-term exposure, endpoint versus multiple time-point analyses of responses, effects of energy availability and the food web effects, physiological and genomic responses, parental and transgenerational effects and adaptation potential. The manuscripts will highlight how new approaches and methodologies can enhance our understanding of the complex interactions in response to ocean acidification and warming for a better management of marine resources.

Dr. Catriona Clemmesen-Bockelmann
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diversity is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 850 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Eco-physiological responses Food web responses
  • Genomic responses
  • Life stage dependent sensitivities
  • Parental effects
  • Adaptation potential
  • Upscaling from individuals to populations

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle You Better Repeat It: Complex CO2 × Temperature Effects in Atlantic Silverside Offspring Revealed by Serial Experimentation
Diversity 2018, 10(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10030069
Received: 31 March 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 17 July 2018 / Published: 20 July 2018
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Abstract
Concurrent ocean warming and acidification demand experimental approaches that assess biological sensitivities to combined effects of these potential stressors. Here, we summarize five CO2 × temperature experiments on wild Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia, offspring that were reared under factorial combinations of CO
[...] Read more.
Concurrent ocean warming and acidification demand experimental approaches that assess biological sensitivities to combined effects of these potential stressors. Here, we summarize five CO2 × temperature experiments on wild Atlantic silverside, Menidia menidia, offspring that were reared under factorial combinations of CO2 (nominal: 400, 2200, 4000, and 6000 µatm) and temperature (17, 20, 24, and 28 °C) to quantify the temperature-dependence of CO2 effects in early life growth and survival. Across experiments and temperature treatments, we found few significant CO2 effects on response traits. Survival effects were limited to a single experiment, where elevated CO2 exposure reduced embryo survival at 17 and 24 °C. Hatch length displayed CO2 × temperature interactions due largely to reduced hatch size at 24 °C in one experiment but increased length at 28 °C in another. We found no overall influence of CO2 on larval growth or survival to 9, 10, 15 and 13–22 days post-hatch, at 28, 24, 20, and 17 °C, respectively. Importantly, exposure to cooler (17 °C) and warmer (28 °C) than optimal rearing temperatures (24 °C) in this species did not appear to increase CO2 sensitivity. Repeated experimentation documented substantial inter- and intra-experiment variability, highlighting the need for experimental replication to more robustly constrain inherently variable responses. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the early life stages of this ecologically important forage fish appear largely tolerate to even extreme levels of CO2 across a broad thermal regime. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Fishes)
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Open AccessArticle Correlated Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Behavioral and Metabolic Traits of a Large Pelagic Fish
Diversity 2018, 10(2), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/d10020035
Received: 30 March 2018 / Revised: 1 May 2018 / Accepted: 3 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
PDF Full-text (1291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Ocean acidification and warming are co-occurring stressors, yet their effects on early life stages of large pelagic fishes are not well known. Here, we determined the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature at levels projected for the end of the century on
[...] Read more.
Ocean acidification and warming are co-occurring stressors, yet their effects on early life stages of large pelagic fishes are not well known. Here, we determined the effects of elevated CO2 and temperature at levels projected for the end of the century on activity levels, boldness, and metabolic traits (i.e., oxygen uptake rates) in larval kingfish (Seriola lalandi), a large pelagic fish with a circumglobal distribution. We also examined correlations between these behavioral and physiological traits measured under different treatments. Kingfish were reared from the egg stage to 25 days post-hatch in a full factorial design of ambient and elevated CO2 (~500 µatm and ~1000 µatm) and temperature (21 °C and 25 °C). Activity levels were higher in fish from the elevated temperature treatment compared with fish reared under ambient temperature. However, elevated CO2 did not affect activity, and boldness was not affected by either elevated CO2 or temperature. Both elevated CO2 and temperature resulted in increased resting oxygen uptake rates compared to fish reared under ambient conditions, but neither affected maximum oxygen uptake rates nor aerobic scope. Resting oxygen uptake rates and boldness were negatively correlated under ambient temperature, but positively correlated under elevated temperature. Maximum oxygen uptake rates and boldness were also negatively correlated under ambient temperature. These findings suggest that elevated temperature has a greater impact on behavioral and physiological traits of larval kingfish than elevated CO2. However, elevated CO2 exposure did increase resting oxygen uptake rates and interact with temperature in complex ways. Our results provide novel behavioral and physiological data on the responses of the larval stage of a large pelagic fish to ocean acidification and warming conditions, demonstrate correlations between these traits, and suggest that these correlations could influence the direction and pace of adaptation to global climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Marine Fishes)
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