Special Issue "Advance in Molecular Diagnostics and Imaging"

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A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2013)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Zhen Cheng (Website)

Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford and Bio-X Program, Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Lucas Center, P095, Stanford, CA 94305-5484, USA
Phone: 650-723-7866
Fax: +650 736 7925
Interests: molecular imaging; bionanotechnology; cancer research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Early diagnosis and effective monitoring the treatment efficacy of malignant tumor are essential for minimizing patients’ morbidity and mortality. Traditional diagnosis of malignancy is based on pathologic examination, whereas molecular diagnostics and imaging go beyond structural assessment. They are emerging methodologies for the early detection of cancer and expected to be very usefully for noninvasively monitoring early treatment response. Molecular probes can be specific targeting molecules, such as receptor ligands, enzyme substrates, and antibodies of high specificity for selected protein targets. They provide important information about pathophysiologic processes behind tumor formation. The development of novel molecular probes is thus critical to the modern molecular medicine. Multimodality imaging combines the advantages of different imaging technique such as PET, SPECT, MRI, CT, ultrasound and optics to yield highly detailed anatomic and molecular information of living organisms. This special issue aims to call research and review articles on the latest advancement in the development and application of novel molecular diagnostic and imaging techniques in cancer research.

Dr. Zhen Cheng
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • molecular diagnostics
  • early-stage detection
  • cancer
  • molecular probe
  • multimodality imaging

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Multi-Camera System for Bioluminescence Tomography in Preclinical Oncology Research
Diagnostics 2013, 3(3), 325-343; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3030325
Received: 7 May 2013 / Revised: 13 June 2013 / Accepted: 26 June 2013 / Published: 9 July 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1499 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) of cells expressing luciferase is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating molecular events and tumor dynamics in the living animal. Current usage is often limited to planar imaging, but tomographic imaging can enhance the usefulness of this technique in [...] Read more.
Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) of cells expressing luciferase is a valuable noninvasive technique for investigating molecular events and tumor dynamics in the living animal. Current usage is often limited to planar imaging, but tomographic imaging can enhance the usefulness of this technique in quantitative biomedical studies by allowing accurate determination of tumor size and attribution of the emitted light to a specific organ or tissue. Bioluminescence tomography based on a single camera with source rotation or mirrors to provide additional views has previously been reported. We report here in vivo studies using a novel approach with multiple rotating cameras that, when combined with image reconstruction software, provides the desired representation of point source metastases and other small lesions. Comparison with MRI validated the ability to detect lung tumor colonization in mouse lung. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Molecular Diagnostics and Imaging)
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Open AccessArticle Quantification of Right and Left Ventricular Function in Cardiac MR Imaging: Comparison of Semiautomatic and Manual Segmentation Algorithms
Diagnostics 2013, 3(2), 271-282; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3020271
Received: 17 February 2013 / Revised: 21 March 2013 / Accepted: 25 March 2013 / Published: 3 April 2013
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (387 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a semiautomatic segmentation method for the anatomical and functional assessment of both ventricles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance (MR) examinations, reducing user interaction to a “mouse-click”. Fifty-two patients with cardiovascular diseases [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a semiautomatic segmentation method for the anatomical and functional assessment of both ventricles from cardiac cine magnetic resonance (MR) examinations, reducing user interaction to a “mouse-click”. Fifty-two patients with cardiovascular diseases were examined using a 1.5-T MR imaging unit. Several parameters of both ventricles, such as end-diastolic volume (EDV), end-systolic volume (ESV) and ejection fraction (EF), were quantified by an experienced operator using the conventional method based on manually-defined contours, as the standard of reference; and a novel semiautomatic segmentation method based on edge detection, iterative thresholding and region growing techniques, for evaluation purposes. No statistically significant differences were found between the two measurement values obtained for each parameter (p > 0.05). Correlation to estimate right ventricular function was good (r > 0.8) and turned out to be excellent (r > 0.9) for the left ventricle (LV). Bland-Altman plots revealed acceptable limits of agreement between the two methods (95%). Our study findings indicate that the proposed technique allows a fast and accurate assessment of both ventricles. However, further improvements are needed to equal results achieved for the right ventricle (RV) using the conventional methodology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Molecular Diagnostics and Imaging)

Review

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Open AccessReview Current Staging Procedures in Urinary Bladder Cancer
Diagnostics 2013, 3(3), 315-324; doi:10.3390/diagnostics3030315
Received: 17 May 2013 / Revised: 13 June 2013 / Accepted: 18 June 2013 / Published: 25 June 2013
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (327 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Currently computed tomography (CT) represents the most widely used standard imaging modality in muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer. Visualization of local tumor or depth of invasion as well as lymph node staging, however, is often impaired. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted sequences, [...] Read more.
Currently computed tomography (CT) represents the most widely used standard imaging modality in muscle-invasive urinary bladder cancer. Visualization of local tumor or depth of invasion as well as lymph node staging, however, is often impaired. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with diffusion-weighted sequences, determination of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values or utilization of superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles potentially exhibits advantages in the assessment of local tumor or lymph node involvement and therefore might play a role in routine staging of urinary bladder cancer in the future. Likewise, positron emission tomography (PET) with the currently utilized tracers 18F-FDG, 11C-choline and 11C-acetate is investigated in bladder cancer patients—mostly in combination with diagnostic CT. Although promising results could be obtained for these PET/CT examinations in smaller series, their true value cannot be determined at present. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advance in Molecular Diagnostics and Imaging)
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