Special Issue "Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics"

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A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2015)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Amparo Salvador-Carreño (Website)

Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Valencia Doctor Moliner St. 50, 46100-Burjassot, Valencia, Spain
Fax: + 34 963544436
Interests: analytical chemistry; chromatography; spectroscopy; cosmetic products
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Alberto Chisvert Sanía (Website)

Facultad de Química, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain
Interests: analytical chemistry; liquid and gas chromatography; mass spectrometry; solid-phase and liquid-phase microextraction; cosmetic analysis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Health authorities in the different countries are fully aware of the need to offer excellent quality, generally in consumer products and particularly in cosmetic products. This quality encompasses the expected efficacy of the product and unquestionable safety.
Therefore, there are legislations in different countries, states or international communities that regulate all aspects of the manufacture and marketing of cosmetic products. These regulations include lists of banned substances in cosmetic products, and substances whose use is restricted to a certain level of concentration and/or may be present only in certain products for application on certain areas of the body.
While there are official or consistent methods of analysis for their use in countries, states or communities, they do not fully cover the cosmetic sector’s needs due to the high number of possible ingredients and contaminants and the diverse cosmetic forms. Moreover, some of the existing methods need to be modernized in accordance with scientific advances in analytical chemistry.
Therefore, the aim of this special issue is to provide a collection of articles regarding development and validation of new accurate analytical methods with state of the art characteristics for quality control of cosmetic products.
As quality control in a cosmetic company requires a high number of analyses per year, simple, rapid, low cost and low toxicity methods are especially encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Amparo Salvador-Carreño
Prof. Dr. Alberto Chisvert Sanía
Guest Editors

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • cosmetic products
  • raw materials
  • analytical techniques (UV/Vis spectrometry, IR spectrometry, mass spectrometry, atomic spectrometry, electroanalytical techniques, liquid and gas chromatography and others)
  • sample preparation (liquid and solid phase extraction, microextraction, liquid and solid phase microextraction, microwave irradiation, sonication, etc.)

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Portable EDXRF for Quality Assurance of Cosmetics
Cosmetics 2015, 2(3), 277-285; doi:10.3390/cosmetics2030277
Received: 25 April 2015 / Revised: 25 July 2015 / Accepted: 11 August 2015 / Published: 18 August 2015
PDF Full-text (787 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Portable Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence is a viable, cost and time effective analytical technique for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of a wide range of samples. The objective of this study is to present a methodology for quantification of nail polishes, eye shadows, [...] Read more.
Portable Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence is a viable, cost and time effective analytical technique for qualitative and quantitative evaluation of a wide range of samples. The objective of this study is to present a methodology for quantification of nail polishes, eye shadows, lipsticks and lip gloss using thin film geometry. The samples were applied over thin films, simulating its use on face and nails. It was possible to quantify S, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Ba and Bi. The methodology is viable and could be useful to forensic science, quality control on industry of raw materials or final products and supervision by regulatory agencies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics)
Open AccessArticle Handheld Raman Spectroscopy for the Distinction of Essential Oils Used in the Cosmetics Industry
Cosmetics 2015, 2(2), 162-176; doi:10.3390/cosmetics2020162
Received: 11 April 2015 / Revised: 8 May 2015 / Accepted: 20 May 2015 / Published: 27 May 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (967 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Essential oils are highly appreciated by the cosmetics industry because they have antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, among others. Since essential oils are natural products, their inclusion in cosmetic formulations is a common practice. Currently, low-quality and/or adulterated essential oils can be found [...] Read more.
Essential oils are highly appreciated by the cosmetics industry because they have antimicrobial and antioxidant properties, among others. Since essential oils are natural products, their inclusion in cosmetic formulations is a common practice. Currently, low-quality and/or adulterated essential oils can be found on the market; therefore, analytical methods for control are required. Raman spectroscopy is a versatile technique that can be used for quality control tasks; the portability of modern devices expand the analytical possibilities also to in situ measurements. Fifteen essential oils of interest for the cosmetics industry were measured using a handheld Raman spectrometer, and the assignment of the main bands observed in their average spectra was proposed. In most cases, it is possible to distinguish the essential oils by a simple visual inspection of their characteristic Raman bands. However, for essential oils extracted from closely-related vegetable species and containing the same main component in a very high proportion, the visual inspection of the spectra may be not enough, and the application of chemometric methods is suggested. Characteristic Raman bands for each essential oil can be used to both identify the essential oils and detect adulterations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics)
Open AccessArticle In-Vial Micro-Matrix-Solid Phase Dispersion for the Analysis of Fragrance Allergens, Preservatives, Plasticizers, and Musks in Cosmetics
Cosmetics 2014, 1(3), 171-201; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1030171
Received: 28 May 2014 / Revised: 7 July 2014 / Accepted: 9 July 2014 / Published: 22 July 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1189 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Fragrance allergens, preservatives, plasticizers, and synthetic musks are usually present in cosmetic and personal care products formulations and many of them are subjected to use restrictions or labeling requirements. Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) is a very suitable analytical technique for the extraction [...] Read more.
Fragrance allergens, preservatives, plasticizers, and synthetic musks are usually present in cosmetic and personal care products formulations and many of them are subjected to use restrictions or labeling requirements. Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) is a very suitable analytical technique for the extraction of these compounds providing a simple, low cost sample preparation, and the possibility of performing both extraction and clean-up in one step, reducing possible contamination and analyte losses. This extraction technique has been successfully applied to many cosmetics ingredients allowing obtaining quantitative recoveries. A new very simple micro-MSPD procedure performing the disruption step in a vial is proposed for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of 66 chemicals usually present in cosmetics and personal care products. The method was validated showing general recoveries between 80% and 110%, relative standard deviation (RSD) values lower than 15%, and limits of detection (LODs) below 30 ng·g−1. The validated method was applied to a broad range of cosmetics and personal care products, including several products intended for baby care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics)
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Open AccessArticle Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry Measurement of Caffeine in Caffeine-Laced Pants and in Urine and Skin of a Pants User
Cosmetics 2014, 1(2), 82-93; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1020082
Received: 31 January 2014 / Revised: 31 March 2014 / Accepted: 6 April 2014 / Published: 15 April 2014
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Abstract
A fast and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the measurement of caffeine in caffeine-laced pants and in urine and skin of a pants user. The substance and its internal standard (N-ethylnorcotinine) were separated by [...] Read more.
A fast and sensitive ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was developed for the measurement of caffeine in caffeine-laced pants and in urine and skin of a pants user. The substance and its internal standard (N-ethylnorcotinine) were separated by reversed phase chromatography with 5 mM ammonium formate pH 3.0 and 0.3% formic acid in acetonitrile mobile phase (83:17 v/v) by isocratic elution and detected by tandem mass spectrometry operated in multiple reaction monitoring mode via positive electrospray ionization. Linearity was studied from 1.4 to100 ng/mL range for urine, from 5 to 100 ng/cotton swab for skin caffeine and from 1.3 to 100 µg/samples for 4 cm2 textile samples. Good determination coefficients (r2 = 0.99) were found in all cases. At three concentrations spanning the linear dynamic ranges of different samples mean recoveries of caffeine were always higher than 80% and intra-assay and inter-assay imprecision and inaccuracy were always better than 105%. For the first time, caffeine content in this cosmetotextile was determined together with the measurement of caffeine released on the user skin, the absorbed amount with resulting urinary concentrations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics)
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Open AccessArticle Bio-Guided Targeting for Preservative and Anti-Ageing Cosmetic Ingredient Development
Cosmetics 2014, 1(1), 14-28; doi:10.3390/cosmetics1010014
Received: 25 September 2013 / Revised: 16 December 2013 / Accepted: 23 December 2013 / Published: 2 January 2014
PDF Full-text (356 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To develop a new antioxidant, antibacterial and natural cosmetic ingredient without cytotoxicity to skin cells, bioactive molecules contained in Kalanchoe pinnata leaf methanolic extract were targeted using semi-preparative HPLC fractionation linked to biological activity tests. Chromatographic effluent was collected at the column [...] Read more.
To develop a new antioxidant, antibacterial and natural cosmetic ingredient without cytotoxicity to skin cells, bioactive molecules contained in Kalanchoe pinnata leaf methanolic extract were targeted using semi-preparative HPLC fractionation linked to biological activity tests. Chromatographic effluent was collected at the column outlet into a 96 deep-well microplate, filling successively all the wells. After freeze-drying, the microplate was ready to use for different biological tests such as antimicrobial activity on microorganisms, skin cell viability and antioxidant activity on human keratinocyte cells. The injection of only 2.64 mg of crude extract into the HPLC system reveals a good correlation between the chromatographic peaks and the different biological activities. One fraction is mainly of interest since good antibacterial and antioxidant activities without cytotoxicity are observed. The analysis of this fraction using mass spectrometry allows the identification of glycoside derivatives of quercetin, isorhamnetin and kaempferol. Thus, a correlation between biological activity and the presence of these flavonoids is obtained. This screening method allows a rapid fractionation associated with a biological activity evaluation and a first molecular identification, saving time by limiting sample treatments and solvent consumption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analytical Methods for Quality Control of Cosmetics)
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Journal Contact

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Cosmetics Editorial Office
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cosmetics@mdpi.com
Tel. +41 61 683 77 34
Fax: +41 61 302 89 18
Editorial Board
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