Special Issue "Hair Care Cosmetics"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 August 2016)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Won-Soo Lee

Department of Dermatology and Institute of Hair and Cosmetic Medicine, Yonsei University, Wonju College of Medicine, 162 Ilsan-dong, Wonju, Kangwon-do 220-701, Korea
E-Mail
Phone: +82-33-741-0622
Fax: +82-33-748-2650
Interests: hair biology; hair cosmetology; integral hair lipid; hair shaft integrity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hair care cosmetics are very popular in modern human life and their use continues to grow due to increase interests to healthy and beautiful hair. This Special Issue will provide an overview on hair care cosmetics and increase our understanding of the many aspects of them with a particular interest in ingredients and types of products. There is a wide range of hair care cosmetics that have been used for a long time, and also newer technologies have been incorporated to produce newer products. This issue will include several authoritative articles that draw upon the collective expertise of undisputed leaders in the fields of hair care cosmetics. The purpose of this Special Issue on “Hair Care Cosmetics” is to provide trustworthy and useful information aimed, not only at the cosmetic scientist and dermatologist, but also at all of those interested in hair care products.

Prof. Dr. Won-Soo Lee
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hair
  • hair care
  • hair care cosmetics
  • hair care products
  • cosmetic ingredient
  • healthy hair

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview In Vitro Methodologies to Evaluate the Effects of Hair Care Products on Hair Fiber
Received: 30 August 2016 / Revised: 21 December 2016 / Accepted: 23 December 2016 / Published: 3 January 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (203 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Consumers use different hair care products to change the physical appearance of their hair, such as shampoos, conditioners, hair dye and hair straighteners. They expect cosmetics products to be available in the market to meet their needs in a broad and effective manner.
[...] Read more.
Consumers use different hair care products to change the physical appearance of their hair, such as shampoos, conditioners, hair dye and hair straighteners. They expect cosmetics products to be available in the market to meet their needs in a broad and effective manner. Evaluating efficacy of hair care products in vitro involves the use of highly accurate equipment. This review aims to discuss in vitro methodologies used to evaluate the effects of hair care products on hair fiber, which can be assessed by various methods, such as Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Optical Coherence Tomography, Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, Protein Loss, Electrophoresis, color and brightness, thermal analysis and measuring mechanical resistance to combing and elasticity. The methodology used to test hair fibers must be selected according to the property being evaluated, such as sensory characteristics, determination of brightness, resistance to rupture, elasticity and integrity of hair strain and cortex, among others. If equipment is appropriate and accurate, reproducibility and ease of employment of the analytical methodology will be possible. Normally, the data set must be discussed in order to obtain conclusive answers to the test. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair Care Cosmetics)
Open AccessReview Essential of Hair Care Cosmetics
Received: 18 July 2016 / Revised: 12 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 27 September 2016
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3375 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nowadays, hair care and style play a very important role in people’s physical aspect and self-perception. Hair cosmetics can be distinguished into two main categories: cosmetics with temporary effect on the hair, for example shampoos, conditioners, sprays, and temporary colors; and cosmetics with
[...] Read more.
Nowadays, hair care and style play a very important role in people’s physical aspect and self-perception. Hair cosmetics can be distinguished into two main categories: cosmetics with temporary effect on the hair, for example shampoos, conditioners, sprays, and temporary colors; and cosmetics with permanent effect on the hair, such as permanent waves, relaxers, bleaches and permanent colors. These cosmetic procedures may induce hair abnormalities. We provide an overview on the most important characteristics of these procedures, analyzing components and effects on the hair. Finally, we evaluated new camouflage techniques and tattoo scalp. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair Care Cosmetics)
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Open AccessReview Endeavors in the Area of Hair Care—Chemical Aspects of Hair Care Processes and Products
Received: 11 May 2016 / Revised: 23 June 2016 / Accepted: 24 June 2016 / Published: 16 August 2016
PDF Full-text (21529 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The paper focuses on historical review of explorations and progress in the field of hair care. The descriptive theme of the survey is accompanied by references to specific investigations of the structure and physico-chemical properties of hair that are essential for evolving of
[...] Read more.
The paper focuses on historical review of explorations and progress in the field of hair care. The descriptive theme of the survey is accompanied by references to specific investigations of the structure and physico-chemical properties of hair that are essential for evolving of novel processes and products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair Care Cosmetics)
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Open AccessReview Human Hair and the Impact of Cosmetic Procedures: A Review on Cleansing and Shape-Modulating Cosmetics
Received: 20 May 2016 / Revised: 13 July 2016 / Accepted: 14 July 2016 / Published: 25 July 2016
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (6171 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hair can be strategically divided into two distinct parts: the hair follicle, deeply buried in the skin, and the visible hair fiber. The study of the hair follicle is mainly addressed by biological sciences while the hair fiber is mainly studied from a
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Hair can be strategically divided into two distinct parts: the hair follicle, deeply buried in the skin, and the visible hair fiber. The study of the hair follicle is mainly addressed by biological sciences while the hair fiber is mainly studied from a physicochemical perspective by cosmetic sciences. This paper reviews the key topics in hair follicle biology and hair fiber biochemistry, in particular the ones associated with the genetically determined cosmetic attributes: hair texture and shape. The traditional and widespread hair care procedures that transiently or permanently affect these hair fiber features are then described in detail. When hair is often exposed to some particularly aggressive cosmetic treatments, hair fibers become damaged. The future of hair cosmetics, which are continuously evolving based on ongoing research, will be the development of more efficient and safer procedures according to consumers’ needs and concerns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair Care Cosmetics)
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Open AccessReview Telogen Effluvium
Received: 20 February 2016 / Revised: 21 March 2016 / Accepted: 21 March 2016 / Published: 25 March 2016
PDF Full-text (858 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Kligman first coined the term telogen effluvium (TE) in 1961 to describe the state of increased shedding of otherwise normal telogen hairs. TE may be primary or secondary to a wide variety of potential triggers including febrile illness, drugs, thyroid disorders, and child
[...] Read more.
Kligman first coined the term telogen effluvium (TE) in 1961 to describe the state of increased shedding of otherwise normal telogen hairs. TE may be primary or secondary to a wide variety of potential triggers including febrile illness, drugs, thyroid disorders, and child birth. The diagnosis of secondary TE can be made by identifying known triggers from the history in the 3–4 months preceding the onset of increased hair shedding and by investigating to exclude endocrine, nutritional, or auto immune aetiologies. Scalp biopsy to identify the earliest stages of androgenetic alopecia may be required in some cases. Primary TE may be acute or chronic. In acute TE, the shedding resolves within 3–6 months and the hair density recovers completely. In chronic TE, the shedding can continue with minor fluctuations in severity for decades. In this review, possible causative factors, pathogenesis, clinical presentations and treatment options are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hair Care Cosmetics)
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