Special Issue "Nanostructured Thin Films"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 16 February 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Chih-hung (Alex) Chang

School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-4003, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-541-737-8548
Interests: thin film transsitors; photovoltaics; integrated chemical systems; nanomaterials; phase equilibria
Guest Editor
Dr. Seung-Yeol Han

CSD Nano Inc., Corvallis, OR 97330, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured thin films are among the most exciting research areas in the field of functional thin films and coatings. The ability to control and tailor the material properties by tuning the nanoscale features provides exciting opportunities to develop novel thin film materials with tunable and multifunctional properties. Nanostructured thin films had found applications in various areas ranging from solar energy, battery, supercapacitor, chemical sensing, optics, heat tranfer, tribology, electonics, catalysts to automobile. For examples, nanoporous gradient thin films as antireflection coatings have opened a new way towards their field-use in low-cost solar photovoltaics and multifuctional nanostructured thin films have significantly enhance phase-change heat tranfer performance for thermal energy management. To support the continuing development of this growing research field, we are assembling a Special Issue of Coatings to encourage researchers worldwide to showcase their research papers, short communications, and review articles on this exciting research area.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Synthesis and growth of nanostructured thin films 
• Characterizations of nanostructured thin films
• Structure-property relationships
• Functional applications of nanostructured thin films for:    
  • -Battery    
  • -Catalyts    
  • -Electronics   
  • -Heat transfer     
  • -Mechanics   
  • -Optics   
  • -Solar energy    
  • -Sensors   
  • -Supercapacitor    
  • -Tribilogy

We hope to receive your valuable input and to make this a successful issue.

Prof. Dr. Chih-hung Chang
Dr. Seung-Yeol Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • thin film
  • nanostructure
  • synthesis
  • growth
  • thin film devices
  • nanomanufacturing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle An Experimental Study on Nano-Carbon Films as an Anti-Wear Protection for Drilling Tools
Coatings 2017, 7(12), 228; doi:10.3390/coatings7120228
Received: 6 October 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 11 December 2017
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Abstract
Carbon thin films of 50–100 nm thickness were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition in vacuum at different laser fluences from 2 to 6 J/cm2. The deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy for compositional assessment, scanning electron microscopy for morphology/thickness evaluations,
[...] Read more.
Carbon thin films of 50–100 nm thickness were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition in vacuum at different laser fluences from 2 to 6 J/cm2. The deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy for compositional assessment, scanning electron microscopy for morphology/thickness evaluations, and X-ray reflectivity for density, thickness, and roughness determinations. The films were ~100 nm thin, smooth, droplet-free, made of a-C:H type of diamond-like carbon. The mechanical properties of synthesized films were studied by nanoindentation and adhesion tests. The films that were obtained at low laser fluences (2, 3 J/cm2) had better mechanical properties as compared to those synthesized at higher fluences. The mean values of hardness were around 20 GPa, while the friction coefficient was 0.06. The deposition conditions of carbon thin films that displayed the best mechanical properties were further used to coat commercial drills. Both uncoated and coated drills were tested on plates that were made of three types of steel: Stainless steel 304, general use AISI 572 Gr 65 steel (OL60), and AISI D3 tool steel (C120). All of the drill edges and tips were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopes. The coated samples were clearly found to be more resistant, and displayed less morphological defects than their uncoated counterparts when drilling stainless steel and OL60 plates. In the case of C120 steel, carbon coatings failed because of the high friction between drill and the metal plate resulting in tip edges blunting that occurred during processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Thin Films)
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