Special Issue "Nanostructured Thin Films"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 February 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Chih-hung (Alex) Chang

School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-4003, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-541-737-8548
Interests: thin film transsitors; photovoltaics; integrated chemical systems; nanomaterials; phase equilibria
Guest Editor
Dr. Seung-Yeol Han

CSD Nano Inc., Corvallis, OR 97330, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanostructured thin films are among the most exciting research areas in the field of functional thin films and coatings. The ability to control and tailor the material properties by tuning the nanoscale features provides exciting opportunities to develop novel thin film materials with tunable and multifunctional properties. Nanostructured thin films had found applications in various areas ranging from solar energy, battery, supercapacitor, chemical sensing, optics, heat tranfer, tribology, electonics, catalysts to automobile. For examples, nanoporous gradient thin films as antireflection coatings have opened a new way towards their field-use in low-cost solar photovoltaics and multifuctional nanostructured thin films have significantly enhance phase-change heat tranfer performance for thermal energy management. To support the continuing development of this growing research field, we are assembling a Special Issue of Coatings to encourage researchers worldwide to showcase their research papers, short communications, and review articles on this exciting research area.

In particular, the topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

• Synthesis and growth of nanostructured thin films 
• Characterizations of nanostructured thin films
• Structure-property relationships
• Functional applications of nanostructured thin films for:    
-Battery    
-Catalyts    
-Electronics   
-Heat transfer     
-Mechanics   
-Optics   
-Solar energy    
-Sensors   
-Supercapacitor    
-Tribilogy

We hope to receive your valuable input and to make this a successful issue.

Prof. Dr. Chih-hung Chang
Dr. Seung-Yeol Han
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • thin film
  • nanostructure
  • synthesis
  • growth
  • thin film devices
  • nanomanufacturing

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Process and Formulation Strategies to Improve Adhesion of Nanoparticulate Coatings on Stainless Steel
Coatings 2018, 8(5), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8050156
Received: 19 January 2018 / Revised: 17 April 2018 / Accepted: 21 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
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Abstract
The use of ceramic nanoparticles in coatings can significantly improve their mechanical properties such as hardness, adhesion to substrate, and scratch and abrasion resistance. A successful enhancement of these properties depends strongly on the coating formulation used, and the subsequent structure formed during
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The use of ceramic nanoparticles in coatings can significantly improve their mechanical properties such as hardness, adhesion to substrate, and scratch and abrasion resistance. A successful enhancement of these properties depends strongly on the coating formulation used, and the subsequent structure formed during coating. The aim of the present work was to enhance the adhesion between nanoparticulate coatings and stainless-steel substrates. A covalent particle structure was formed and better mechanical properties were achieved by modifying alumina nanoparticles, as well as substrates, with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane and by using a formulation consisting of solvent, modified particles, and bisphenol-A-diglycidylether as cross-linking additive. In addition to the adhesion force needed to remove the coating from the substrate, the type of failure (adhesive or cohesive) was characterized to gain a deeper understanding of the structure formation and to identify interdependencies between process, formulation, and coating structure properties. The modification process and the formulation composition were varied to achieve a detailed conception of the relevant correlations. By relating the results to other structural properties, such as the theoretical porosity and thickness, it was possible to understand the formation of the coating structure in more detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Thin Films)
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Open AccessArticle Self-Assembled Composite Langmuir Films via Fluorine-Containing Bola-Type Derivative with Metal Ions
Coatings 2018, 8(4), 141; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8040141
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 12 April 2018 / Published: 14 April 2018
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Abstract
The design and preparation of functional bolaamphiphile-based composite films are of key importance for application in a wide variety of fields. This study demonstrates a new approach to constructing composite films by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method using a fluorine-containing bola-type diacid derivative with
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The design and preparation of functional bolaamphiphile-based composite films are of key importance for application in a wide variety of fields. This study demonstrates a new approach to constructing composite films by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) method using a fluorine-containing bola-type diacid derivative with different metal ions. The bola-type molecule we used could be spread on water surfaces and metal ion subphases to fabricate various nanostructured ultrathin films. The obtained data demonstrated that the employed metal ions, including Ag(I), Cu(II), and Eu(III) ions in subphase solutions, can regulate the organized molecular stacking and form interfacial nanostructures deposited in LB films. It was found that the interfacial coordinating interactions can easily occur between carboxyl groups in a molecular skeleton with metal ions in the formed composite films. The formation of composite films was confirmed by changes in the surface pressure-area isotherms, morphologies, and spectra of the transferred LB films. While various research works have achieved the regulation of functions and nanostructures of sophisticated bola-type compounds, we here demonstrate a simple routine to modulate the nanostructures and organized packing of bola-type compounds composite films by changing the metal ions in subphase solutions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Thin Films)
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Open AccessArticle Recent Advances in Low-Temperature Deposition Methods of Transparent, Photocatalytic TiO2 Coatings on Polymers
Coatings 2018, 8(4), 131; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings8040131
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 30 March 2018 / Accepted: 4 April 2018 / Published: 4 April 2018
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Abstract
In this paper, we present an overview as well as current advances in the low-temperature deposition of highly crystalline suspensions of titania nanoparticles on polymers for photocatalytic applications. The presence of preformed titania nanoparticles yields the possibility of producing photocatalytically active coatings at
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In this paper, we present an overview as well as current advances in the low-temperature deposition of highly crystalline suspensions of titania nanoparticles on polymers for photocatalytic applications. The presence of preformed titania nanoparticles yields the possibility of producing photocatalytically active coatings at reduced temperatures. Transparent and photocatalytically active TiO2 coatings that degrade organic matter, have been widely applied to bestow self-cleaning properties onto surfaces. This low-temperature deposition method and its transition to polymers would open an entire array of possible self-cleaning applications. During this research, incorporation of a silica buffer layer was applied to improve the compatibility of the inorganic coating on a substrate, such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polyphenylsulphone (PPSU). The photocatalytic activity of the obtained coating was analyzed for its photocatalytic abilities by evaluating the color removal of a dye solution (methylene blue, MB) under UV irradiation and compared with commercial Pilkington Activ® self-cleaning glass. Our results indicate that the titania-coated silica-polymer systems yield a higher photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of organic pollutants. This method proves that the deposition of highly crystalline anatase suspensions on silica buffer layers is a viable method to produce photocatalytic coatings on heat-sensitive substrates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Thin Films)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Scan-Mode Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Jet Processed Reduced Graphene Oxides for Quasi-Solid-State Gel-Electrolyte Supercapacitors
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 26 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
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Abstract
A scanning atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is essential for high-throughput large-area and roll-to-roll processes. In this study, we evaluate scan-mode APPJ for processing reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) that are used as the electrodes of quasi-solid-state gel-electrolyte supercapacitors. rGO nanoflakes are mixed with ethyl
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A scanning atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is essential for high-throughput large-area and roll-to-roll processes. In this study, we evaluate scan-mode APPJ for processing reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) that are used as the electrodes of quasi-solid-state gel-electrolyte supercapacitors. rGO nanoflakes are mixed with ethyl cellulose (EC) and terpineol to form pastes for screen-printing. After screen-printing the pastes on carbon cloth, a DC-pulse nitrogen APPJ is used to process the pastes in the scan mode. The maximal temperature attained is ~550 °C with a thermal influence duration of ~10 s per scan. The pastes are scanned by APPJ for 0, 1, 3 and 5 times. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicates the reduction of C-O binding content as the number of scan increases, suggesting the oxidation/decomposition of EC. The areal capacitance increases and then decreases as the number of scan increases; the best achieved areal capacitance is 15.93 mF/cm2 with one APPJ scan, in comparison to 4.38 mF/cm2 without APPJ processing. The capacitance retention rate of the supercapacitor with the best performance is ~93% after a 1000-cycle cyclic voltammetry (CV) test. The optimal number of APPJ scans should enable the proper removal of inactive EC and improved wettability while minimizing the damage caused to rGOs by nitrogen APPJ processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Thin Films)
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Open AccessArticle An Experimental Study on Nano-Carbon Films as an Anti-Wear Protection for Drilling Tools
Coatings 2017, 7(12), 228; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings7120228
Received: 6 October 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 7 December 2017 / Published: 11 December 2017
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Abstract
Carbon thin films of 50–100 nm thickness were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition in vacuum at different laser fluences from 2 to 6 J/cm2. The deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy for compositional assessment, scanning electron microscopy for morphology/thickness evaluations,
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Carbon thin films of 50–100 nm thickness were synthesized by Pulsed Laser Deposition in vacuum at different laser fluences from 2 to 6 J/cm2. The deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy for compositional assessment, scanning electron microscopy for morphology/thickness evaluations, and X-ray reflectivity for density, thickness, and roughness determinations. The films were ~100 nm thin, smooth, droplet-free, made of a-C:H type of diamond-like carbon. The mechanical properties of synthesized films were studied by nanoindentation and adhesion tests. The films that were obtained at low laser fluences (2, 3 J/cm2) had better mechanical properties as compared to those synthesized at higher fluences. The mean values of hardness were around 20 GPa, while the friction coefficient was 0.06. The deposition conditions of carbon thin films that displayed the best mechanical properties were further used to coat commercial drills. Both uncoated and coated drills were tested on plates that were made of three types of steel: Stainless steel 304, general use AISI 572 Gr 65 steel (OL60), and AISI D3 tool steel (C120). All of the drill edges and tips were studied by optical and scanning electron microscopes. The coated samples were clearly found to be more resistant, and displayed less morphological defects than their uncoated counterparts when drilling stainless steel and OL60 plates. In the case of C120 steel, carbon coatings failed because of the high friction between drill and the metal plate resulting in tip edges blunting that occurred during processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructured Thin Films)
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