Special Issue "Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2017)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Giovanni Neri

Department of Engineering, University of Messina, 98166 Messina, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +39 090 397 7464
Interests: chemical synthesis of sensing materials; oxide semiconductor-based gas sensors; nanostructures for chemical and electrochemical sensing; automotive gas sensors; biomedical sensors
Guest Editor
Dr. Salvatore Gianluca Leonardi

Department of Engineering, University of Messina, Contrada Di Dio, 98166 Messina, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: nanomaterials; modified electrodes; conductometric gas sensors; electrochemical sensors and biosensors; sensor for environmental and biomedical applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Solid state gas sensors have attracted intensive research interest in the past few years, and have been used for a wide range of applications. Nowadays, modern technology is demanding more efficient gas sensors for advanced applications. Consequently, there is a considerable effort towards the goal of high performance gas sensors based on novel sensing materials. The unique properties (e.g., ultra-thin structure, large surface area and tunable energy band diagrams) of novel two-dimensional (2D) inorganic materials  (ZnO, MoS2, SnS2, WS2, etc.) have, so far, led to immense research regarding this material’s fundamentals, applications, and, more recently, its potential for gas sensing.

This Special Issue is therefore intended to encourage researchers worldwide to report their results in research and development on the most recent advances and overview in 2D inorganic nanomaterials for applications in solid state gas sensors along with their relevant features and technological aspects. Original research papers are welcome (but not limited) on all aspects that focus their attention on (2D) inorganic materials as sensing materials: (i) novel preparation methods; (ii) sensing principles, mechanisms and technologies; (iii) gas sensor applications.

Prof. Giovanni Neri
Dr. Salvatore Gianluca Leonardi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Two-dimensional (2D) inorganic materials
  • Ultrathin layered nanomaterials
  • Transition metal dichalcogenides
  • Gas sensing principles and technologies
  • Functionalized and hybrid nanomaterials based on 2D nanomaterials
  • Gas sensor applications

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 29; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040029
Received: 12 October 2017 / Revised: 12 October 2017 / Accepted: 12 October 2017 / Published: 15 October 2017
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing)

Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Comparison of the Sensing Properties of ZnO Nanowalls-Based Sensors toward Low Concentrations of CO and NO2
Chemosensors 2017, 5(3), 20; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5030020
Received: 22 April 2017 / Revised: 26 June 2017 / Accepted: 29 June 2017 / Published: 4 July 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2708 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This work focuses on the synthesis and gas sensing properties of ZnO nanowalls (ZnO NWLs) grown by a simple cheap chemical bath deposition method on a thin layer of aluminum (about 20 nm thick) printed on the Pt interdigitated electrodes area of conductometric
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This work focuses on the synthesis and gas sensing properties of ZnO nanowalls (ZnO NWLs) grown by a simple cheap chemical bath deposition method on a thin layer of aluminum (about 20 nm thick) printed on the Pt interdigitated electrodes area of conductometric alumina platforms. Post-deposition annealing in nitrogen atmosphere at 300 °C enabled the formation of a ZnO intertwined 2D foils network. A wide characterization was carried out to investigate the composition, morphology and microstructure of the nanowalls layer formed. The gas sensing properties of the films were studied by measuring the changes of electrical resistance upon exposure to low concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) in air. The sensor response to CO or NO2 was found to be strongly dependent on the operating temperature, providing a means to tailor the sensitivity and selectivity toward these selected target gases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Thin 2D: The New Dimensionality in Gas Sensing
Chemosensors 2017, 5(3), 21; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5030021
Received: 17 May 2017 / Revised: 20 June 2017 / Accepted: 27 June 2017 / Published: 18 July 2017
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (6057 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Since the first report of graphene, thin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with atomic or molecular thicknesses have attracted great research interest for gas sensing applications. This was due to the distinctive physical, chemical, and electronic properties related to their ultrathin thickness, which positively affect
[...] Read more.
Since the first report of graphene, thin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with atomic or molecular thicknesses have attracted great research interest for gas sensing applications. This was due to the distinctive physical, chemical, and electronic properties related to their ultrathin thickness, which positively affect the gas sensing performances. This feature article discusses the latest developments in this field, focusing on the properties, preparation, and sensing applications of thin 2D inorganic nanomaterials such as single- or few-layer layered double hydroxides/transition metal oxides/transition metal dichalcogenides. Recent studies have shown that thin 2D inorganic nanomaterials could provide monitoring of harmful/toxic gases with high sensitivity and a low concentration detection limit by means of conductometric sensors operating at relatively low working temperatures. Promisingly, by using these thin 2D inorganic nanomaterials, it may open a simple way of improving the sensing capabilities of conductometric gas sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing)
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Open AccessReview Two-Dimensional Zinc Oxide Nanostructures for Gas Sensor Applications
Chemosensors 2017, 5(2), 17; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5020017
Received: 13 April 2017 / Revised: 16 May 2017 / Accepted: 19 May 2017 / Published: 26 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (8515 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, due to their unique physical and chemical properties, are showing great potential in catalysis and electronic/optoelectronic devices. Moreover, thanks to the high surface to volume ratio, 2D materials provide a large specific surface area for the adsorption of molecules, making
[...] Read more.
Two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials, due to their unique physical and chemical properties, are showing great potential in catalysis and electronic/optoelectronic devices. Moreover, thanks to the high surface to volume ratio, 2D materials provide a large specific surface area for the adsorption of molecules, making them efficient in chemical sensing applications. ZnO, owing to its many advantages such as high sensitivity, stability, and low cost, has been one of the most investigated materials for gas sensing. Many ZnO nanostructures have been used to fabricate efficient gas sensors for the detection of various hazardous and toxic gases. This review summarizes most of the research articles focused on the investigation of 2D ZnO structures including nanosheets, nanowalls, nanoflakes, nanoplates, nanodisks, and hierarchically assembled nanostructures as a sensitive material for conductometric gas sensors. The synthesis of the materials and the sensing performances such as sensitivity, selectivity, response, and recovery times as well as the main influencing factors are summarized for each work. Moreover, the effect of mainly exposed crystal facets of the nanostructures on sensitivity towards different gases is also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing)
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Open AccessReview Two-Dimensional Transition Metal Disulfides for Chemoresistive Gas Sensing: Perspective and Challenges
Chemosensors 2017, 5(2), 15; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5020015
Received: 5 April 2017 / Revised: 1 May 2017 / Accepted: 3 May 2017 / Published: 5 May 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (5079 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Transition metal disulfides have been attracting significant attentions in recent years. There are extensive applications of transition metal disulfides, especially on gas sensing applications, due to their large specific surface-to-volume ratios, high sensitivity to adsorption of gas molecules and tunable surface functionality depending
[...] Read more.
Transition metal disulfides have been attracting significant attentions in recent years. There are extensive applications of transition metal disulfides, especially on gas sensing applications, due to their large specific surface-to-volume ratios, high sensitivity to adsorption of gas molecules and tunable surface functionality depending on the decoration species or functional groups. However, there are several drawbacks such as poor gas selectivity, sluggish recovery characteristics and difficulty in the fabrication of large-scale devices. Here, we provide a review of recent progress on the chemoresistive gas sensing properties of two-dimensional transition metal disulfides. This review also provides various methods to enhance the gas sensing performance of two-dimensional disulfides, such as surface functionalization, decoration receptor functions and developing nanostructures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing)
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