Special Issue "Advances in the Field of Nanostructured Ceramic Composites"

A special issue of Ceramics (ISSN 2571-6131).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Laura Montanaro

Politecnico di Torino, DISAT, corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: ceramics; ceramic processing; ceramic composites; concrete technology; material characterization; powder engineering; powder synthesis; porosity; sintering; Sol-Gel
Guest Editor
Prof. Paola Palmero

Politecnico di Torino, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Torino, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +39 0110904678
Interests: ceramics; ceramic processing; ceramic composites; geopolymers; material characterization; powder engineering; transparent ceramics; porous ceramics; sintering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the production of ceramic composites with nano-sized features has been receiving increasing attention in order to achieve relevant improvements in mechanical and/or functional performances in view of several advanced industrial applications (for instance, in aerospace and automotive sectors, biomedical field, energy and electrical uses, etc.).

Nanostructured composite ceramics present an important scientific and technological knowledge content. Therefore, a successful approach to nanostructuration, that means a strict control of phase composition and distribution at the nano-microscale and consequently of the performances at the macroscale, requires a rigorous tailoring of each step of the ceramic manufacturing chain and innovative routes for the production of composites powders as well as for their shaping and densification.

The intent of this Special Issue is to review the current state-of-the-art of nano-composite ceramics, but also to focus on new developments in concepts and technologies.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Novel processing of composite powders and components
  • Nano/microstructure-property relationships
  • Oxide and non-oxide composite materials
  • Dense and porous components as well as coatings
  • Innovative design of composite nano-microstructures
  • Sintering strategies to preserve nanostructuration
  • Improvements in properties of nanostructured composite materials
  • Advanced characterization tools for nanostructured composites

Contributions should be original papers, collecting novel results, or reviews, presenting a sound, extended and critical analysis of the state-of-the-art.

Prof. Laura Montanaro
Prof. Paola Palmero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Ceramics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanostructured composite ceramics
  • Novel processing routes
  • Nano-sintering
  • Structure-property relationships
  • Design of nanostructured composites

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Spark Plasma Sintered Zirconia Ceramic Composites with Graphene-Based Nanostructures
Ceramics 2018, 1(1), 153-164; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1010014
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 12 August 2018 / Accepted: 15 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
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Abstract
The addition of graphene-based nanostructures (GBNs) can improve the inherent fragility of ceramics and provide them with improved electrical and thermal conductivities. However, both the starting material (ceramic matrix and GBNs) and the processing/sintering approach are crucial for the final composite microstructure and
[...] Read more.
The addition of graphene-based nanostructures (GBNs) can improve the inherent fragility of ceramics and provide them with improved electrical and thermal conductivities. However, both the starting material (ceramic matrix and GBNs) and the processing/sintering approach are crucial for the final composite microstructure and properties. This work focuses on the influence of the content and dimensions of the GBN filler (10 and 20 vol%; 3 and ~150 layers), the powder-processing conditions (dry versus wet), and the homogenization method (ultrasound sonication versus high-energy planetary ball milling) on GBN/tetragonal zirconia (3YTZP) composites. The microstructure and electrical properties of the spark plasma sintered (SPS) composites were quantified and analyzed. The highest microstructural homogeneity with an isotropic microstructure was achieved by composites prepared with thicker GBNs milled in dry conditions. A high content (20 vol%) of few-layered graphene as a filler maximizes the electrical conductivity of the composites, although it hinders their densification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Field of Nanostructured Ceramic Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Siloxane Precursor-Based Protective Coatings for High Modulus Carbon Fibers in Ceramic Matrix Composites
Ceramics 2018, 1(1), 128-138; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1010011
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 20 July 2018 / Accepted: 24 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
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Abstract
Carbon fibers are outstanding reinforcements for ceramic components due to their excellent creep and long-term thermochemical and thermomechanical stability. Nevertheless, these properties are dramatically downgraded if the unprotected fibers are exposed to an oxidative or corrosive environment. Thin ceramic coatings can improve the
[...] Read more.
Carbon fibers are outstanding reinforcements for ceramic components due to their excellent creep and long-term thermochemical and thermomechanical stability. Nevertheless, these properties are dramatically downgraded if the unprotected fibers are exposed to an oxidative or corrosive environment. Thin ceramic coatings can improve the corrosion resistance and tailor the fiber/matrix interface in order to achieve optimized stress transfer and damage tolerance. The continuous liquid phase coating (CLPC) technique with subsequent pyrolysis is a promising alternative to chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The possibility to deposit homogenous thin flaw-free coating layers on every filament of high tenacity carbon fiber bundles has been successfully proven in previous studies. In this work, high modulus carbon fibers were coated with different polysiloxane-based resins, and the obtained rovings were implemented in SiOC matrices by the precursor impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) route. Thermogravimetric analysis shows an increased oxidation resistance of the coated fibers compared with reference samples. Enhanced fiber/matrix interface strength further improved the mechanical performance of the fabricated composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Field of Nanostructured Ceramic Composites)
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Open AccessArticle Enhanced Mechanical Properties in ED-Machinable Zirconia-Tungsten Carbide Composites with Yttria-Neodymia Co-Stabilized Zirconia Matrix
Ceramics 2018, 1(1), 26-37; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1010004
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 29 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
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Abstract
The electrical discharge machining-process (EDM) is a smart solution to optimize the manufacturing chain of customized and complex shaped ceramic components. To comply with the high requirements for the machine and mold design, it is necessary to improve the mechanical properties of ED-machinable
[...] Read more.
The electrical discharge machining-process (EDM) is a smart solution to optimize the manufacturing chain of customized and complex shaped ceramic components. To comply with the high requirements for the machine and mold design, it is necessary to improve the mechanical properties of ED-machinable ceramics. In this study, ceramic composites with a tetragonal zirconia matrix and tungsten carbide as electrically conductive dispersion were investigated. To improve the toughness of this high strength material, co-stabilized zirconia coated with yttria and neodymia as dopants were used in the compositions with 1.5/1.5 and 1.75/1.25 mol %. These recipes were compared to commercial 3Y-TZP as a reference matrix material combined with the same WC raw powder. The electrically conductive phase content was varied from 20 to 28 vol %. For all compositions, the ceramic blanks were hot pressed at identical dwell and pressure, but with various sintering temperatures (1300 °C to 1450 °C) and then tested with respect to the mechanical and electrical properties. By variation of the stabilizer system, a significantly higher toughness of up to 11.3 MPa√m compared to 5.3 MPa√m for 3Y-TZP-20WC is achieved while the bending strength stays at a comparable high level of >1500 MPa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Field of Nanostructured Ceramic Composites)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Semiconducting Metal Oxides Nanocomposites for Enhanced Detection of Explosive Vapors
Ceramics 2018, 1(1), 98-119; https://doi.org/10.3390/ceramics1010009
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 25 June 2018
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Abstract
In recent years, the detection of ultratraces of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs), such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), has gained considerable attention due to associated problems related to environment, security against terrorists and health. The principle of NACs detection is simple since any explosive emits a
[...] Read more.
In recent years, the detection of ultratraces of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs), such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), has gained considerable attention due to associated problems related to environment, security against terrorists and health. The principle of NACs detection is simple since any explosive emits a rather small, but detectable number of molecules. Thus, numerous detection techniques have been developed throughout the years, but their common limitations are rather large sizes and weights, high power consumption, unreliable detection with false alarms, insufficient sensitivity and/or chemical selectivity, and hyper-sensitivity to mechanical influences associated with very high price. Thus, there is a strong need of cheap, rapid, sensitive, and simple analytical methods for the detection and monitoring of these explosives in air. Semiconducting metal oxides (SMOs) allow the preparation of gas sensors able to partially or totally overcome these drawbacks, and this paper aims to shortly review the most recent SMOs nanocomposites able to sense explosives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in the Field of Nanostructured Ceramic Composites)
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