Special Issue "Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Oliver Kröcher

Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: emission control catalysts, selective catalytic reduction, diesel oxidation catalysts, methane oxidation, bioenergy, catalytic processes for gaseous and liquid biofuels, operando spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent diesel scandal made the public again aware of the fact that NOx emissions from diesel engines are a major threat to human health and by no means easy to avoid. The most efficient process to reduce NOx emissions from lean exhaust gases is selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with ammonia, which has undergone tremendous development over the past decades. Originally only applied in stationary power plants and industrial installations, SCR systems are now installed also in millions of mobile diesel engines, ranging from off-road machineries, heavy-duty and light-duty trucks and passenger cars, to locomotives and ships. These applications are particularly challenging due to the varying operation conditions of mobile diesel engines with respect to exhaust gas temperature, exhaust gas flow, NOx inlet concentrations, ambient temperature and available installation space. As a matter of fact, many problems are still encountered with all the different SCR applications and much research is being conducted to overcome them.

Submissions to this special issue on “Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx” are welcome in the form of original research papers or short reviews that reflect the state of research in the SCR field on the following topics: Selective catalytic reduction of NOx (SCR) for diesel vehicles/stationary power plants/industrial installations, SCR catalyst research and development (V-based catalysts, Fe-zeolites, Cu-zeolites), catalyst deactivation, SCR reaction mechanisms, SCR kinetics and modelling, structure-function relationships in SCR catalysts and dosage/decomposition of reducing agents for SCR.

Prof. Dr. Oliver Kröcher
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with ammonia/urea
  • SCR in diesel vehicles, stationary power plants and industrial installations
  • SCR catalyst research and development on V-based systems, Fe-zeolites and Cu-zeolites
  • Catalyst deactivation
  • SCR reaction mechanisms
  • SCR kinetics and modelling
  • Structure-function relationships in SCR catalysts
  • Control, dosage and decomposition of reducing agents for SCR

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Concept of Vaporized Urea Dosing in Selective Catalytic Reduction
Catalysts 2017, 7(10), 307; doi:10.3390/catal7100307
Received: 7 September 2017 / Revised: 28 September 2017 / Accepted: 13 October 2017 / Published: 19 October 2017
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Abstract
This work tried to identify the influence of dosing vaporized urea solution in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. In the SCR method, optimising the urea evaporation and mixing properties can significantly improve the NOx conversion efficiency in the catalyst. It can
[...] Read more.
This work tried to identify the influence of dosing vaporized urea solution in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. In the SCR method, optimising the urea evaporation and mixing properties can significantly improve the NOx conversion efficiency in the catalyst. It can also exert a positive effect on the uniformity of NH3 concentration distribution across the catalyst face. The concept of an electrically evaporated urea-dosing system was investigated and it was found that urea pre-heating prior to introduction into the exhaust gas is favourable for enhancing NOx removal under steady-state and transient engine operation. In the urea evaporating system the heating chamber was of a cylindrical tube shape and the urea vapour was introduced into the exhaust by means of a Venturi orifice. The concept urea dosing was only a custom-made solution, but proved to be superior to the regular dosing system operating in the liquid phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx)
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Open AccessArticle Experimental Research of an Active Solution for Modeling In Situ Activating Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst
Catalysts 2017, 7(9), 258; doi:10.3390/catal7090258
Received: 21 July 2017 / Revised: 29 August 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 31 August 2017
PDF Full-text (2189 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The effect of active solutions suitable for the in situ activation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts was experimentally investigated using a designed in situ activation modeling device. To gain further insight, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), specific surface area analysis (BET), Fourier transform
[...] Read more.
The effect of active solutions suitable for the in situ activation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts was experimentally investigated using a designed in situ activation modeling device. To gain further insight, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), specific surface area analysis (BET), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analyses were used to investigate the effects of different reaction conditions on the characteristics of the deactivated catalysts. The activation effect of loading V2O5, WO3 and MoO3 on the surface of the deactivated catalysts was analyzed and the correlation to the denitrification activity was determined. The results demonstrate that the prepared activating solution of 1 wt % vanadium (V), 9 wt % tungsten (W), and 6 wt % molybdenum (Mo) has a beneficial effect on the deactivation of the catalyst. The activated catalyst resulted in a higher NO removal rate when compared to the deactivated catalyst. Furthermore, the NO removal rate of the activated catalyst reached a maximum of 32%. The activity of the SCR catalyst is closely linked to the concentration of the active ingredients. When added in optimum amounts, the active ingredients helped to restore the catalytic activity. In particular, the addition of active ingredients, the availability of labile surface oxygen, and the presence of small pores improved the denitrification efficiency. Based on these results, active solutions can effectively solve the problem of denitrification catalyst deactivation. These findings are a reference for the in-situ activation of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (SCR-DeNOx) catalyst. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx)
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