Special Issue "Chemical Bond Formation for Nanocarbon-Based Composites"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tomoya Takada

Department of Applied Chemistry and Bioscience, Chitose Institute of Science and Technology, Chitose 066-8655, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: carbon materials; composites; reaction intermediates; photochemistry; radiation chemistry; computational chemistry; electron spin resonance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Composite materials containing nanocarbons have received considerable attention in many technological fields (electric engineering, mechanical engineering, biomedicine and so on). To obtain durable composite materials, chemical bond formation is a useful technique. For example, many nanocarbons can react with organic and inorganic radicals to form covalent bonds. Utilizing this process, nanocarbons can be chemically bound with other materials (polymer, glass or ceramics).

This Special Issue is aimed at introducing the recent cutting-edge findings on chemistry and application of chemical bond formation between nanocarbons with other materials. Key topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Development of novel reaction processes;
  • Computational study of reaction mechanisms;
  • Characterization of composite materials;
  • Application of composite materials.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Tomoya Takada
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

• chemical bond formation
• composite materials
• characterization
• industrial application
• biomedical application

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Thermal Treatment of Melt-Spun Fibers Based on High Density PolyEthylene and Lignin
C 2017, 3(4), 35; doi:10.3390/c3040035
Received: 1 October 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 4 November 2017 / Published: 13 November 2017
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Abstract
The purpose of this study was the synthesis of novel low-cost carbon fibers along with the investigation of the optimal parameters of temperature and time for the stabilization of hybrid high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and lignin melt-spun fibers. These fibers were manufactured by physical
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The purpose of this study was the synthesis of novel low-cost carbon fibers along with the investigation of the optimal parameters of temperature and time for the stabilization of hybrid high-density polyethylene (HDPE) and lignin melt-spun fibers. These fibers were manufactured by physical compounding of HDPE and chemically-modified softwood kraft lignin (SKL) in order to produce green fiber precursors for carbon fiber synthesis. Stabilization tests were performed with respect to thermal treatment (physical method) and sulfonation treatment (chemical method). The results revealed that only chemical methods induce the desired thermal process-ability to the composite fibers in order to manufacture carbon fibers by using a simple method. This investigation shed light on the stabilization techniques of polymeric fibers in the absence of any cyclic groups in terms of environmentally-friendly mass production of carbon fibers using low-cost and green raw materials. This study facilitates incorporation of softwood lignin in homegrown polymeric fibers by a low-cost production process via melt-spinning of composite fibers, which were successfully stabilized using a facile chemical method and carbonized. Additionally, a comprehensive investigation of the thermal behavior of the samples was accomplished, by examining several ways and aspects of fiber thermal treating. The properties of all studied fibers are presented, compared, and discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Bond Formation for Nanocarbon-Based Composites)
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Open AccessArticle DFT Study on the Interaction of the Smallest Fullerene C20 with Lithium Ions and Atoms
C 2017, 3(2), 15; doi:10.3390/c3020015
Received: 28 March 2017 / Revised: 26 April 2017 / Accepted: 28 April 2017 / Published: 10 May 2017
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Abstract
The smallest fullerene C20 with positive electron affinity is considered to be a new organic nano-electronic material. The binding structures and electronic states of lithium ions and atoms (Li+ and Li) trapped on the surface of C20 have been investigated
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The smallest fullerene C20 with positive electron affinity is considered to be a new organic nano-electronic material. The binding structures and electronic states of lithium ions and atoms (Li+ and Li) trapped on the surface of C20 have been investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculation to elucidate the nature of their interaction. It was found that a Li+ can bind to only one site of C20. This is, specifically, on top of the site where Li+ binds to the carbon atom of C20. On the other hand, in the case of a Li atom, two structures were obtained besides the on-top structure. One was pentagonal structure which included a Li atom on a five-membered ring of C20. The other was a triangular structure in which the Li atom bind to the the carbon–carbon bond of C20. Finally, the nature of the interactions between Li ions or atoms and the C20 cluster was discussed on the basis of theoretical results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Bond Formation for Nanocarbon-Based Composites)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Graphene–Noble Metal Nano-Composites and Applications for Hydrogen Sensors
C 2017, 3(4), 29; doi:10.3390/c3040029
Received: 4 September 2017 / Revised: 5 October 2017 / Accepted: 10 October 2017 / Published: 13 October 2017
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Abstract
Graphene based nano-composites are relatively new materials with excellent mechanical, electrical, electronic and chemical properties for applications in the fields of electrical and electronic devices, mechanical appliances and chemical gadgets. For all these applications, the structural features associated with chemical bonding that involve
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Graphene based nano-composites are relatively new materials with excellent mechanical, electrical, electronic and chemical properties for applications in the fields of electrical and electronic devices, mechanical appliances and chemical gadgets. For all these applications, the structural features associated with chemical bonding that involve other components at the interface need in-depth investigation. Metals, polymers, inorganic fibers and other components improve the properties of graphene when they form a kind of composite structure in the nano-dimensions. Intensive investigations have been carried out globally in this area of research and development. In this article, some salient features of graphene–noble metal interactions and composite formation which improve hydrogen gas sensing properties—like higher and fast response, quick recovery, cross sensitivity, repeatability and long term stability of the sensor devices—are presented. Mostly noble metals are effective for enhancing the sensing performance of the graphene–metal hybrid sensors, due to their superior catalytic activities. The experimental evidence for atomic bonding between metal nano-structures and graphene has been reported in the literature and it is theoretically verified by density functional theory (DFT). Multilayer graphene influences gas sensing performance via intercalation of metal and non-metal atoms through atomic bonding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Bond Formation for Nanocarbon-Based Composites)
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