Special Issue "Gastric Cancer"

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A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Roderich E. Schwarz

Goshen Center for Cancer Care, Indiana University Health, 200 High Park Ave., Goshen, IN 46526, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1-574-364-2892
Fax: +1-574-364-2480
Interests: bile duct cancer; gastric cancer; liver cancer; pancreatic cancer
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jean E. Crabtree

Molecular Gastroenterology Section, Leeds Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, St. James's University Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Helicobacter pylori; host-pathogen interactions in gastrointestinal tract; infection and gastrointestinal cancer; mucosal immunology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Review

Open AccessReview Mouse Models of Gastric Cancer
Cancers 2013, 5(1), 92-130; doi:10.3390/cancers5010092
Received: 5 December 2012 / Revised: 8 January 2013 / Accepted: 15 January 2013 / Published: 24 January 2013
Cited by 18 | PDF Full-text (1133 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven
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Animal models have greatly enriched our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of numerous types of cancers. Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, with a poor prognosis and high incidence of drug-resistance. However, most inbred strains of mice have proven resistant to gastric carcinogenesis. To establish useful models which mimic human gastric cancer phenotypes, investigators have utilized animals infected with Helicobacter species and treated with carcinogens. In addition, by exploiting genetic engineering, a variety of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have emerged, such as INS-GAS mice and TFF1 knockout mice. Investigators have used the combination of carcinogens and gene alteration to accelerate gastric cancer development, but rarely do mouse models show an aggressive and metastatic gastric cancer phenotype that could be relevant to preclinical studies, which may require more specific targeting of gastric progenitor cells. Here, we review current gastric carcinogenesis mouse models and provide our future perspectives on this field. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer)
Open AccessReview Molecular Targeted Agents for Gastric Cancer: A Step Forward Towards Personalized Therapy
Cancers 2013, 5(1), 64-91; doi:10.3390/cancers5010064
Received: 3 December 2012 / Revised: 1 January 2013 / Accepted: 14 January 2013 / Published: 21 January 2013
Cited by 22 | PDF Full-text (302 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gastric cancer (GC) represents a major cancer burden worldwide, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its insidious nature, presentation is usually late and often carries a poor prognosis. Despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for
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Gastric cancer (GC) represents a major cancer burden worldwide, and remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death. Due to its insidious nature, presentation is usually late and often carries a poor prognosis. Despite having improved treatment modalities over the last decade, for most patients only modest improvements have been seen in overall survival. Recent progress in understanding the molecular biology of GC and its signaling pathways, offers the hope of clinically significant promising advances for selected groups of patients. Patients with Her-2 overexpression or amplification have experienced benefit from the integration of monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab to the standard chemotherapy. Additionally, drugs targeting angiogenesis (bevacizumab, sorafenib, sunitinib) are under investigation and other targeted agents such as mTOR inhibitors, anti c-MET, polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors are in preclinical or early clinical development. Patient selection and the development of reliable biomarkers to accurately select patients most likely to benefit from these tailored therapies is now key. Future trials should focus on these advances to optimize the treatment for GC patients. This article will review recent progress and current status of targeted agents in GC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer)
Open AccessReview Gastric Cancer: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment
Cancers 2013, 5(1), 48-63; doi:10.3390/cancers5010048
Received: 30 November 2012 / Revised: 8 January 2013 / Accepted: 11 January 2013 / Published: 16 January 2013
Cited by 52 | PDF Full-text (338 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient
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Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of death from malignant disease worldwide and most frequently discovered in advanced stages. Because curative surgery is regarded as the only option for cure, early detection of resectable gastric cancer is extremely important for good patient outcomes. Therefore, noninvasive diagnostic modalities such as evolutionary endoscopy and positron emission tomography are utilized as screening tools for gastric cancer. To date, early gastric cancer is being treated using minimally invasive methods such as endoscopic treatment and laparoscopic surgery, while in advanced cancer it is necessary to consider multimodality treatment including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and surgery. Because of the results of large clinical trials, surgery with extended lymphadenectomy could not be recommended as a standard therapy for advanced gastric cancer. Recent clinical trials had shown survival benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy after curative resection compared with surgery alone. In addition, recent advances of molecular targeted agents would play an important role as one of the modalities for advanced gastric cancer. In this review, we summarize the current status of diagnostic technology and treatment for gastric cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer)
Open AccessReview The Critical Impact of HIF-1a on Gastric Cancer Biology
Cancers 2013, 5(1), 15-26; doi:10.3390/cancers5010015
Received: 26 November 2012 / Revised: 21 December 2012 / Accepted: 5 January 2013 / Published: 10 January 2013
Cited by 19 | PDF Full-text (809 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) monitors the cellular response to the oxygen levels in solid tumors. Under hypoxia conditions, HIF-1a protein is stabilized and forms a heterodimer with the HIF-1β subunit. The HIF-1 complex activates the transcription of numerous target genes in order to
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Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) monitors the cellular response to the oxygen levels in solid tumors. Under hypoxia conditions, HIF-1a protein is stabilized and forms a heterodimer with the HIF-1β subunit. The HIF-1 complex activates the transcription of numerous target genes in order to adapt the hypoxic environment in human cancer cells. In gastric cancer patients, HIF-1a activation following extended hypoxia strongly correlates with an aggressive tumor phenotype and a poor prognosis. HIF-1a activation has been also reported to occur via hypoxia-independent mechanisms such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling and ROS production. This article argues for the critical roles of HIF-1a in glucose metabolism, carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis, cell survival and chemoresistance, focusing on gastric cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastric Cancer)

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