Special Issue "Piezoelectric Biosensors"

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A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Iva Chianella

Cranfield Health, Vincent Building, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, UK
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +44 1234 758322
Interests: piezoelectric biosensors/sensors; electrochemical biosensors/sensors; optical biosensors/sensors; molecularly imprinted polymers; molecularly imprinted nanoparticles; novel assays development; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Piezoelectric transducers are still heavily investigated to develop cheap and easy to use biosensors for medical, environmental and food applications. Such devices rely on the monitoring of the frequency of oscillation (or acoustic wave) of the piezoelectric component, which is affected by the mass adsorbed on the sensor or by changes in density and viscosity of the liquid in contact with the sensor surface.

In this special issue we would like to discuss the latest developments in designing sensitive and specific piezoelectric biosensors. This can be achieved either by using novel surface acoustic wave devices or by utilising nanomaterials such as metal or polymeric nanoparticles. We would like to invite research and review articles related, but not limited, to the following topics: QCM, Surface Acoustic Wave and Piezoelectric Cantilever biosensors (including immunosensors, DNA, aptamers and molecularly imprinted polymers based sensors). Research papers describing the use of nanomaterials such as gold or silver nanoparticles, polymeric nanoparticles, nanofilms, nanowires and nanotubes, to improve the performance of piezoelectric biosensors are also invited.

Dr. Iva Chianella
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 300 CHF (Swiss Francs). English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.


Keywords

  • piezoelectric biosensors
  • QCM biosensors
  • Surface Acoustic Wave biosensors
  • Piezoelectric Cantilever biosensors
  • piezoelectric immunosensors
  • molecularly imprinted polymers
  • DNA
  • aptamers
  • nanoparticles
  • nanofilms

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Polymerization Parameters Influencing the QCM Response Characteristics of BSA MIP
Biosensors 2014, 4(2), 161-171; doi:10.3390/bios4020161
Received: 8 April 2014 / Revised: 23 May 2014 / Accepted: 9 June 2014 / Published: 16 June 2014
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (552 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final
[...] Read more.
Designing Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for sensing proteins is still a somewhat empirical process due to the inherent complexity of protein imprinting. Based on Bovine Serum Albumin as a model analyte, we explored the influence of a range of experimental parameters on the final sensor responses. The optimized polymer contains 70% cross linker. Lower amounts lead to higher sensitivity, but also sensor response times substantially increase (to up to 10 h) at constant imprinting effect (signal ratio MIP/NIP on quartz crystal microbalance—QCM). However, by shifting the polymer properties to more hydrophilic by replacing methacrylic acid by acrylic acid, part of the decreased sensitivity can be recovered leading to appreciable sensor responses. Changing polymer morphology by bulk imprinting and nanoparticle approaches has much lower influence on sensitivity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle A Phage Display Screening Derived Peptide with Affinity for the Adeninyl Moiety
Biosensors 2014, 4(2), 137-149; doi:10.3390/bios4020137
Received: 4 March 2014 / Revised: 11 April 2014 / Accepted: 23 April 2014 / Published: 29 April 2014
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (913 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (K
[...] Read more.
Phage display screening of a surface-immobilized adenine derivative led to the identification of a heptameric peptide with selectivity for adenine as demonstrated through quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) studies. The peptide demonstrated a concentration dependent affinity for an adeninyl moiety decorated surface (KD of 968 ± 53.3 μM), which highlights the power of piezoelectric sensing in the study of weak interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Biosensors)
Open AccessArticle Hierarchical Thin Film Architectures for Enhanced Sensor Performance: Liquid Crystal-Mediated Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Imprinted Polymer Films for the Selective Recognition of Bupivacaine
Biosensors 2014, 4(2), 90-110; doi:10.3390/bios4020090
Received: 11 February 2014 / Revised: 15 March 2014 / Accepted: 28 March 2014 / Published: 8 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (2176 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of
[...] Read more.
Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of template were used for control studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies demonstrated comparable chemical compositions for LC and control polymer films. SEM studies revealed that the topologies of the molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in the LC medium (LC-MIP) exhibit discernible 40 nm thick nano-fiber structures, quite unlike the polymers prepared in the absence of the LC-phase. The sensitivity of the LC-MIP in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was 67.6 ± 4.9 Hz/mM under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions, which was ≈250% higher than for the sensor prepared using the aqueous medium. Detection was possible at 100 nM (30 ng/mL), and discrimination of bupivacaine from closely related structural analogs was readily achieved as reflected in the corresponding stability constants of the MIP-analyte complexes. The facile fabrication and significant enhancement in sensor sensitivity together highlight the potential of this LC-based imprinting strategy for fabrication of polymeric materials with hierarchical architectures, in particular for use in surface-dependent application areas, e.g., biomaterials or sensing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Biosensors)

Review

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Open AccessReview Piezoelectric Biosensors for Organophosphate and Carbamate Pesticides: A Review
Biosensors 2014, 4(3), 301-317; doi:10.3390/bios4030301
Received: 12 May 2014 / Revised: 28 July 2014 / Accepted: 7 August 2014 / Published: 9 September 2014
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (454 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Due to the great amount of pesticides currently being used, there is an increased interest for developing biosensors for their detection. Among all the physical transducers, piezoelectric systems have emerged as the most attractive due to their simplicity, low instrumentation costs, possibility for
[...] Read more.
Due to the great amount of pesticides currently being used, there is an increased interest for developing biosensors for their detection. Among all the physical transducers, piezoelectric systems have emerged as the most attractive due to their simplicity, low instrumentation costs, possibility for real-time and label-free detection and generally high sensitivity. This paper presents an overview of biosensors based on the quartz crystal microbalance, which have been reported in the literature for organophosphate and carbamate pesticide analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Piezoelectric Biosensors)
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