Special Issue "Biosensor and Bioanalytical Microtechniques in Environmental, Food & Clinical Analysis"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Roberto Pilloton

1st Researcher at CNR Institute for Atmospheric Pollution CNR - Via Salaria km 29, 300, Monterotondo, Rome, Italy
E-Mail
Interests: electrochemistry, environmental analytical chemistry; biosensors; sensors and sensing; continuous flow monitoring; immobilization techniques; enzyme inhibitors; lab on a chip; nanostructured electrodes; screen printed electrodes; herbicides; pesticides; phenolic compounds; cholinesterases; photosystem II; laccase; tyrosinase; immobilized cells
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Donatella Albanese

Department of Industrial Engineering (DIIn), University of Salerno, Fisciano(SA), Italy
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +390-8996-4129
Interests: biosensors, immunosensors, screen printed electrodes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemistry, immobilization techniques; food quality, food safety

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A selection of the best works presented during the 12th International Workshop on Biosensors and BioAnalytical Microtechniques for Environmental, Food and Clinical Analyses (BBMEC12) will be collected in this Special Issue. The workshop, held in Rome on 25–29 September, 2017, has evolved since its inception in 1994, from a mainly European-based biosensor conference to a truly international world-wide gathering of our premier biosensor researchers. It ranks among the most important biosensor conferences world-wide. Researches from over 20 countries and typically all major regions of the world, including the Americas, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Europe gather here. In general, the conference is designed with single sessions, and targets the participation of about 150 researchers to provide good bases for in-depth discussions and networking, similar to the Gordon Conferences. BBMEC started in 1994 in Paris and was organized by Marie-Claire Hennion. It was held three times in North America (Las Vegas in 1998, Ithaca in 2001 and Montreal in 2009) and once in India (in 2007). Its associated organization is the International Association of Environmental Analytical Chemistry (IAEAC):


Historical Snapshot of location and chairs of BBMEC conferences

Year

Location

Chair

1994

Paris, France

Marie-Claire Hennion

1996

Lund, Sweden

Jenny Emneus, Lo Gorton

1998

Las Vegas, NV, USA

Jeannette van Emon

1999

Mao, Menorca, Spain

Damian Barcelo

2001

Ithaca, NY, USA

Antje J. Baeumner, Richard Durst

2004

Rome, Italy

Roberto Pilloton

2006

Kusadasi, Turkey

Azmi Telefoncu, Dieter Klockow

2007

Goa, India

Sunil Bhand, Roberto Pilloton

2009

Montreal, Canada

Jean-Francois Masson, Kevin Wilkinson

2011

Weimar, Germany

Karl-Heinz Feller

2015

Regensburg, Germany

Antje J. Bäumner

As for the previous edition in Regesburg (2015), the goal for the 2017 conference is to further develop the successful BBMEC series and implement valuable features from other conferences in order to further increase the conference’s quality and attractiveness. The 12th BBMEC features, thus, include:

Many Invited and Keynote lectures by renowned researchers
Increases the impact on the presentation of cutting-edge ideas
Discussion of unpublished data is mandatory
Increases the importance and urgency of data provided
Increases the need and desire of lively discussions with audience
Increasing the prominence and importance of the poster session
Enables all attendees to prominently discuss their research
Best posters will be selected for prizes
A pre-conference graduate student/postdoc symposium is organized

Enables many young scientists to give oral presentations and discuss among their peers

Keywords: Novel Concepts in Biorecognition, Biosensors, Screening, Array Technology, Imaging, On-site Analysis, Label-free, Application to clinical, food, environmental challenges.

Dr. Roberto Pilloton
Prof. Donatella Albanese
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Ultrasensitive Determination of Malathion Using Acetylcholinesterase Immobilized on Chitosan-Functionalized Magnetic Iron Nanoparticles
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 16; doi:10.3390/bios8010016
Received: 9 January 2018 / Revised: 7 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 13 February 2018
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Abstract
A renewable, disposable, low cost, and sensitive sensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides was constructed by immobilizing the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE), via glutaraldehyde, on magnetic iron nanoparticles (Fe3O4) previously synthesized and functionalized with chitosan (CS). The sensor was
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A renewable, disposable, low cost, and sensitive sensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides was constructed by immobilizing the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE), via glutaraldehyde, on magnetic iron nanoparticles (Fe3O4) previously synthesized and functionalized with chitosan (CS). The sensor was denoted AChE/CS/Fe3O4. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Acetylthiocholine (ATCh) was incubated with AChE/CS/Fe3O4 and attached to a screen-printed electrode using a magnet. The oxidation of thiocholine (from ATCh hydrolysis) was monitored at an applied potential of +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl(KClsat) in 0.1 mol L−1 phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.5) as the supporting electrolyte. A mixture of the pesticide malathion and ATCh was investigated using the same procedure, and the results were compared and expressed as inhibition percentages. For determination of malathion, the proposed sensor presented a linear response in the range from 0.5 to 20 nmol L−1 (R = 0.9942). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.3 and 0.8 nmol L−1, respectively. Real samples were also investigated, with recovery values of 96.0% and 108.3% obtained for tomato and pond water samples, respectively. The proposed sensor is a feasible option for malathion detection, offering a linear response, good sensitivity, and a low detection limit. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle A Low-Cost Inkjet-Printed Aptamer-Based Electrochemical Biosensor for the Selective Detection of Lysozyme
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 7; doi:10.3390/bios8010007
Received: 30 November 2017 / Revised: 23 December 2017 / Accepted: 10 January 2018 / Published: 15 January 2018
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Abstract
Recently, inkjet-printing has gained increased popularity in applications such as flexible electronics and disposable sensors, as well as in wearable sensors because of its multifarious advantages. This work presents a novel, low-cost immobilization technique using inkjet-printing for the development of an aptamer-based biosensor
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Recently, inkjet-printing has gained increased popularity in applications such as flexible electronics and disposable sensors, as well as in wearable sensors because of its multifarious advantages. This work presents a novel, low-cost immobilization technique using inkjet-printing for the development of an aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of lysozyme, an important biomarker in various disease diagnosis. The strong affinity between the carbon nanotube (CNT) and the single-stranded DNA is exploited to immobilize the aptamers onto the working electrode by printing the ink containing the dispersion of CNT-aptamer complex. The inkjet-printing method enables aptamer density control, as well as high resolution patternability. Our developed sensor shows a detection limit of 90 ng/mL with high target selectivity against other proteins. The sensor also demonstrates a shelf-life for a reasonable period. This technology has potential for applications in developing low-cost point-of-care diagnostic testing kits for home healthcare. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Powered Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 11; doi:10.3390/bios8010011
Received: 30 December 2017 / Revised: 17 January 2018 / Accepted: 22 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
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Abstract
With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the
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With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the fuel. This review summarises the fundamental operation of EFCs and discusses the most recent advances for their use as implantable and wearable self-powered sensors. Full article
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Open AccessReview Fluorescence-Free Biosensor Methods in Detection of Food Pathogens with a Special Focus on Listeria monocytogenes
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 63; doi:10.3390/bios7040063
Received: 13 October 2017 / Revised: 11 December 2017 / Accepted: 18 December 2017 / Published: 20 December 2017
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Abstract
Food pathogens contaminate food products that allow their growth on the shelf and also under refrigerated conditions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to lower the limit of detection (LOD) of the method used and to obtain the results within hours to few
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Food pathogens contaminate food products that allow their growth on the shelf and also under refrigerated conditions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to lower the limit of detection (LOD) of the method used and to obtain the results within hours to few days. Biosensor methods exploit the available technologies to individuate and provide an approximate quantification of the bacteria present in a sample. The main bottleneck of these methods depends on the aspecific binding to the surfaces and on a change in sensitivity when bacteria are in a complex food matrix with respect to bacteria in a liquid food sample. In this review, we introduce surface plasmon resonance (SPR), new advancements in SPR techniques, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), as fluorescence-free biosensing technologies for detection of L. monocytogenes in foods. The application of the two methods has facilitated L. monocytogenes detection with LOD of 1 log CFU/mL. Further advancements are envisaged through the combination of biosensor methods with immunoseparation of bacteria from larger volumes, application of lab-on-chip technologies, and EIS sensing methods for multiplex pathogen detection. Validation efforts are being conducted to demonstrate the robustness of detection, reproducibility and variability in multi-site installations. Full article
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