Special Issue "Complex Chromosomal Rearrangements in Cancers and Congenital Disorders"

A special issue of Biomolecules (ISSN 2218-273X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 September 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Cheng-Zhong Zhang

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: chromosomal rearrangements; genome evolution; cancer cell biology
Guest Editor
Dr. Alexander Spektor

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: genome evolution during tumorigenesis and in response to therapy
Guest Editor
Prof. Cynthia Casson Morton

Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human genetics; reproductive medicine; chromosomal rearrangements; next-generation sequencing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

DNA sequencing of cancer tissues and of individuals with congenital disorders has uncovered many patterns of chromosomal alterations that involve multiple rearrangements. Complex chromosomal rearrangements (CCRs) can result from multiple rounds of mutagenesis due to genome instability. A classic example of this type of mutational process is the breakage–fusion–bridge cycles that can lead to gene amplifications, first described by Barbara McClintock back in 1939. CCRs can also be generated in a single catastrophic event causing massive mutagenesis, such as the recently discovered phenomenon of chromothripsis (shattered chromosomes) and several other chromosomal abnormalities, generally referred to as “chromoanagenesis”. Analysis of CCRs in diseases and the search for their mechanisms have led to new research strategies combining experimental cell biology and DNA sequencing, and generated new knowledge on the mechanistic link between CCRs and chromosome segregation errors.

In this special issue, we invite colleagues to contribute both original analyses and reviews on the general subject of complex chromosomal rearrangements. Relevant topics include, but are not limited to, discoveries and descriptions of CCRs in human disease, technology and computational approaches for CCR analysis, and experimental studies of CCR mechanisms and their functional impacts. By bringing together investigators studying CCRs in different disease contexts or using different experimental or analytical approaches, we hope to generate new insight into both the aetiology of CCRs and how they contribute to pathogenesis and drive genome evolution.

Dr. Cheng-Zhong Zhang
Dr. Alexander Spektor
Prof. Cynthia Casson Morton
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biomolecules is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chromosomal rearrangement
  • genome instability
  • chromothripsis
  • cancer genetics
  • karyotypic abnormality
  • bioinformatics and computational biology

Published Papers

There is no accepted submissions to this special issue at this moment.
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