Special Issue "Beverage Sensory Modification"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Manuel Malfeito Ferreira

Linking Landscape, Environment, Agriculture and Food (LEAF) Research Center, Instituto Superior de Agronomia (ISA), University of Lisbon, Lisboa, Portugal
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The modification of beverage sensory characteristics is a continuous goal of the food industry to meet consumer demand and increase the commercial success of new products. This pursuit gathers researchers from a wide diversity of fields, such as food chemistry, microbiology, sensory science, consumer research, and marketing. Processing technologies are also involved because novel products may require the development of new processes. Attention should also be called to sensory modifications induced by unwanted spoilage events and health issues of improved products. For this Special Issue on “Beverage Sensory Modification”, we would like to invite submissions that show what is being currently performed to improve flavor, taste and mouthfeel properties of beverages and to prevent their spoilage.

Original research and review papers are welcome under the following examples:

  • Flavor, taste and mouthfeel enhancement
  • Cross-modal sensory interactions
  • Sensory drivers of beverage preference and liking
  • The role of consumer segmentation on beverage choices
  • Consumer reaction to new products (neophobia)
  • Development of new tasting methodologies
  • Prevention of chemical and microbiological spoilage
  • Health implications of beverage formulations
  • Marketing strategies of novel products 
Prof. Dr. Manuel Malfeito Ferreira
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Comparison of Temporal Profiles among Sucrose, Sucralose, and Acesulfame Potassium after Swallowing Sweetened Coffee Beverages and Sweetened Water Solutions
Received: 5 December 2017 / Revised: 5 March 2018 / Accepted: 28 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
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Abstract
Non-nutritive sweeteners have been used as substitutes for nutritive sweeteners with the goal of preventing obesity and dental caries. The main factor responsible for the difference in taste between beverages containing a nutritive sweetener and those containing a non-nutritive sweetener is the temporal
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Non-nutritive sweeteners have been used as substitutes for nutritive sweeteners with the goal of preventing obesity and dental caries. The main factor responsible for the difference in taste between beverages containing a nutritive sweetener and those containing a non-nutritive sweetener is the temporal profile of sensory attributes. In this study, untrained panelists performed a time–intensity evaluation of sweetness, using one coffee beverage containing a nutritive sweetener (sucrose) and two coffee beverages containing non-nutritive sweeteners (sucralose or acesulfame potassium (acesulfame K)). They evaluated continuously perceived intensity of sweetness for 150 s after swallowing each coffee beverage. We did not detect a significant difference in temporal profiles among the three coffee beverages. To investigate why the temporal profiles of the three coffee beverages followed similar traces, all untrained participants who had participated in the coffee beverage session also performed a time–intensity evaluation of sweetness using three water solutions (sucrose-sweetened, sucralose-sweetened, and acesulfame K–sweetened deionized water). We observed a significant difference in temporal profiles among the three water solutions. These results indicate that differences in the temporal profiles of coffee beverages might be masked by factors other than the sweetness of the sweetener. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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Open AccessArticle Sensory Impact of Polyphenolic Composition on the Oxidative Notes of Chardonnay Wines
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 30 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 1 March 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (1395 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Chardonnay wines have a long-standing reputation regarding their aging potential. However, in some cases, they face premature oxidation a few years after bottling. Scientific reports are, for now, multiparametric and unclear. Polyphenols seem to be an important factor involved in the oxidative stability
[...] Read more.
Chardonnay wines have a long-standing reputation regarding their aging potential. However, in some cases, they face premature oxidation a few years after bottling. Scientific reports are, for now, multiparametric and unclear. Polyphenols seem to be an important factor involved in the oxidative stability of white wines, but their role has not yet been completely characterized. The present study aimed to investigate the link between polyphenol content and the emergence of oxidative odors of bottle-aged Chardonnay wines. In order to obtain samples with noticeable differences in polyphenol content, as well as in sensory oxidative notes, wines from two different vintages were used. For each vintage, three levels of must clarification and two wine closures were implemented. Polyphenol content was analyzed chemically, and the oxidative character was assessed sensorially by a trained panel using a specific intensity scale. The results showed significant effects for closure type and turbidity. However, these effects were strongly affected by vintage. Concerning the polyphenol content, a clear difference was also found between vintages, closures and turbidity levels. Significant linear regression models for REDOX scores pointed out Flavon-3-ols as the main negative predictor, and grape reaction product (GRP) as the main positive predictor. The enological implications are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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Open AccessCommunication Bittersweet Findings: Round Cups Fail to Induce Sweeter Taste
Received: 1 November 2017 / Revised: 12 January 2018 / Accepted: 17 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (435 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
An increasing body of literature demonstrates that consumers associate visual information with specific gustatory elements. This phenomenon is better known as cross-modal correspondence. A specific correspondence that has received attention of late is the one between round forms and sweet taste. Research indicates
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An increasing body of literature demonstrates that consumers associate visual information with specific gustatory elements. This phenomenon is better known as cross-modal correspondence. A specific correspondence that has received attention of late is the one between round forms and sweet taste. Research indicates that roundness (as opposed to angularity) is consistently associated with an increased sweetness perception. Focusing on two different cup forms (round versus angular), two studies tested this association for a butter milk drink and a mate-based soft drink. Results, however, were not able to corroborate the frequently suggested correspondence effect, but a correspondence was found between the angular cup and a more bitter taste for the soft drink. These results are discussed in light of previous findings matching sweetness with roundness and bitterness with angularity, hopefully aiding researchers in this field in conducting future experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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Open AccessArticle Application of a Pivot Profile Variant Using CATA Questions in the Development of a Whey-Based Fermented Beverage
Received: 15 November 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 9 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018
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Abstract
During the development of a food product, the application of rapid descriptive sensory methodologies is very useful to determine the influence of different variables on the sensory characteristics of the product under development. The Pivot profile (PP) and a variant of the technique
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During the development of a food product, the application of rapid descriptive sensory methodologies is very useful to determine the influence of different variables on the sensory characteristics of the product under development. The Pivot profile (PP) and a variant of the technique that includes check-all-that-apply questions (PP + CATA) were used for the development of a milk drink fermented from demineralised sweet whey. Starting from a base formula of partially demineralised sweet whey and gelatin, nine samples were elaborated, to which various concentrations of commercial sucrose, modified cassava starch, and whole milk powder were added. Differences in sucrose content affected the sample texture and flavour and the modified starch was able to decrease the fluidity and increase the texture of creaminess and firmness, of the samples. The two applied sensory methodologies achieved good discrimination between the samples and very similar results, although the data analysis was clearly simplified in relation to the difficulty and time consumed in the PP + CATA variant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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Open AccessArticle Effect of Different Glass Shapes and Size on the Time Course of Dissolved Oxygen in Wines during Simulated Tasting
Received: 21 November 2017 / Revised: 10 December 2017 / Accepted: 20 December 2017 / Published: 4 January 2018
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Abstract
The different shapes and sizes of wine glass are claimed to balance the different wine aromas in the headspace, enhancing the olfactory perception and providing an adequate level of oxygenation. Although the measurement of dissolved oxygen in winemaking has recently received much focus,
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The different shapes and sizes of wine glass are claimed to balance the different wine aromas in the headspace, enhancing the olfactory perception and providing an adequate level of oxygenation. Although the measurement of dissolved oxygen in winemaking has recently received much focus, the role of oxygen in wine tasting needs to be further disclosed. This preliminary study aims to explore, for the first time, the effect of swirling glasses of different shapes and sizes on the oxygen content of wine. Experimental trials were designed to simulate real wine tasting conditions. The O2 content after glass swirling was affected to a considerable extent by both the type of wine and the glass shape. A lack of correlation between the shape parameters of five glasses and the O2 content in wine was found which suggests that the nonequilibrium condition can occur during wine tasting. The International Standard Organisation (ISO) glass—considered to be optimal for the wine tasting—allowed less wine oxygenation than any other glass shapes; and the apparent superiority of the ISO glass is tentatively attributed to the more stable oxygen content with time; i.e., less variability in oxygen content than any other glass shape. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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Open AccessArticle Assessing the Impact of Closure Type on Wine Ratings and Mood
Received: 7 October 2017 / Revised: 26 October 2017 / Accepted: 27 October 2017 / Published: 3 November 2017
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Abstract
We report on a preliminary study designed to assess the impact of the sound of the closure on the taste of wine. Given that people hold certain beliefs around the taste/quality of wines presented in bottles having different closure types, we expected that
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We report on a preliminary study designed to assess the impact of the sound of the closure on the taste of wine. Given that people hold certain beliefs around the taste/quality of wines presented in bottles having different closure types, we expected that the sound of opening might influence people’s wine ratings. In particular, if participants hear a cork being pulled vs. the sound of a screw-cap bottle being opened then these two sounds will likely set different expectations that may then affect people’s judgment of the taste/quality of the wine that they are rating. In order to test this hypothesis, 140 people based in the UK (and of varying degrees of wine expertise) rated two wine samples along four scales, three relating to the wine and one relating to celebratory mood. The results demonstrated that the sound of a bottle being opened did indeed impact ratings. In particular, the quality of the wine was rated as higher, its appropriateness for a celebratory occasion, and the celebratory mood of the participant was also higher following the sound of the cork pop. These results add to the literature demonstrating that the sounds of opening/preparation of food and beverage products can exert a significant influence over the sensory and hedonic aspects of people’s subsequent tasting experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Two Decades of “Horse Sweat” Taint and Brettanomyces Yeasts in Wine: Where do We Stand Now?
Received: 19 February 2018 / Revised: 12 March 2018 / Accepted: 4 April 2018 / Published: 10 April 2018
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Abstract
The unwanted modification of wine sensory attributes by yeasts of the species Brettanomyces bruxellensis due to the production of volatile phenols is presently the main microbiological threat to red wine quality. The effects of ethylphenols and other metabolites on wine flavor is now
[...] Read more.
The unwanted modification of wine sensory attributes by yeasts of the species Brettanomyces bruxellensis due to the production of volatile phenols is presently the main microbiological threat to red wine quality. The effects of ethylphenols and other metabolites on wine flavor is now recognized worldwide and the object of lively debate. The focus of this review is to provide an update of the present knowledge and practice on the prevention of this problem in the wine industry. Brettanomyces bruxellensis, or its teleomorph, Dekkera bruxellensis, are rarely found in the natural environment and, although frequently isolated from fermenting substrates, their numbers are relatively low when compared with other fermenting species. Despite this rarity, they have long been studied for their unusual metabolical features (e.g., the Custers effect). Rising interest over the last decades is mostly due to volatile phenol production affecting high quality red wines worldwide. The challenges have been dealt with together by researchers and winemakers in an effective way and this has enabled a state where, presently, knowledge and prevention of the problem at the winery level is readily accessible. Today, the main issues have shifted from technological to sensory science concerning the effects of metabolites other than ethylphenols and the over estimation of the detrimental impact by ethylphenols on flavor. Hopefully, these questions will continue to be tackled together by science and industry for the benefit of wine enjoyment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Sensory Modification)
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