Special Issue "Beverage Powder"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maja Benković

Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Croatia
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Vast amount of foods and food production raw materials are used in the form of powders. The advantages of powders include smaller volumes, easier transportation and handling, low moisture contents and extended shelf life. These advantages have led to an increasing use of food powders in the food-processing industry in general, as well as in the field of beverage production. Coffee, powdered milk, cocoa, instant tea, vitamin/mineral instant mixes, and beverage powders for specific purposes are some examples of beverage powders present on the market. Today, as consumer demand for functional and “easy to use” products rises, the need for developing new, nutritionally balanced, instant beverage powders is increasing at the same time. New technologies emerge to produce such beverages with optimal nutritional, sensory, physical, and chemical properties. This Special Issue is intended to unite the aspects of beverage powder development, production, and analysis, which include:

  • Reviews on methods and technologies used in beverage powder production

  • Physical, chemical and sensory properties of beverage powders

  • Development of functional beverage powders

  • New technologies in production functional beverage powders

Dr. Maja Benković
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Regression Models for Description of Roasted Ground Coffee Powder Color Change during Secondary Shelf-Life as Related to Storage Conditions and Packaging Material
Received: 20 December 2017 / Revised: 10 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 19 February 2018
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Abstract
Besides sensory attributes, color is a parameter affecting consumers’ perception of the powdered coffee product or brew. The aim of this study was to develop and compare non-linear and linear regression models for the description of experimentally determined color changes during 6 months
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Besides sensory attributes, color is a parameter affecting consumers’ perception of the powdered coffee product or brew. The aim of this study was to develop and compare non-linear and linear regression models for the description of experimentally determined color changes during 6 months of storage in two different packaging materials. Model parameters were estimated using two software packages: Eureqa Formulize (Nutonian, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) and Statistica 10.0 (StatSoft, Palo Alto, CA, USA) and compared based on their R2 goodness of fit. Both non-linear and linear models used in this study pointed to a significant influence of intrinsic (sample moisture content) and external (relative humidity (RH) and temperature) factors on ground roasted coffee color change. Non-linear model was the most suitable for description of color changes during storage. Based on lower moisture sorption of the sample packed in triplex bag, triplex packaging is proposed as the more suitable one. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Powder)
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Open AccessArticle Development and Examination of Sweet Potato Flour Fortified with Indigenous Underutilized Seasonal Vegetables
Received: 23 November 2017 / Revised: 20 December 2017 / Accepted: 22 December 2017 / Published: 8 January 2018
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Abstract
Developing nutrient-rich vegetable flour using locally under-utilized food crops in Africa would improve rural house-hold nutrition. This study seeks to develop nutrient-dense vegetable flour from different proportions of Sweet potato (Sp) 40–100%, Avocado pear (Avo) 10–40%, and Turkey berry (Tor) 10–40%, using completely
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Developing nutrient-rich vegetable flour using locally under-utilized food crops in Africa would improve rural house-hold nutrition. This study seeks to develop nutrient-dense vegetable flour from different proportions of Sweet potato (Sp) 40–100%, Avocado pear (Avo) 10–40%, and Turkey berry (Tor) 10–40%, using completely randomized design (CRD) with 14 treatment combinations and three replications. The proximate composition, mineral composition, and functional properties were investigated on the composite flour. The results showed significant differences in all the parameters analyzed for the various composite flours. As the amount of Avo and Tor was added to the Sp, the proximate composition was enhanced except for the percentage carbohydrate, which decreased from 83.92 to 54.59 g/100 g. The mineral composition was also improved by the incorporation of Avo and Tor. Favourable functional properties were also obtained. The optimal composite flour was made up of 40% Sp, 35% Avo, and 25% Tor. The functional properties of the composite flours were better than the control (Sweet potato flour). Fortifying Sp flour with Avo and Tor is feasible and could be an easy and affordable means to improve rural nutrition, as it requires simple logistics for the ordinary rural household to produce the composite of the desired choice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Powder)
Open AccessArticle The Effect of Carrier Quantity and Drying Method on the Physical Properties of Apple Juice Powders
Received: 16 November 2017 / Revised: 28 November 2017 / Accepted: 4 December 2017 / Published: 1 January 2018
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Abstract
The study aimed at the evaluation of the physical properties of apple juice powders mixed with different concentration of maltodextrin obtained by freeze-, vacuum and spray drying methods. Due to the chemical composition of apple juice there was a possibility to obtain apple
[...] Read more.
The study aimed at the evaluation of the physical properties of apple juice powders mixed with different concentration of maltodextrin obtained by freeze-, vacuum and spray drying methods. Due to the chemical composition of apple juice there was a possibility to obtain apple juice powders by freeze-, spray and vacuum drying, excluding vacuum drying at 40 °C when 15% and 20% of maltodextrin were added. The moisture content of powders was more dependent on the drying method than on the quantity of maltodextrin added. The spray drying process in the context of an increase in maltodextrin quantity resulted in a decrease in the water activity of apple powders, whereas low temperature processes increased its values. Lower values of true density were observed after spray drying in comparison to freeze- and vacuum drying processes. The application of selected drying methods resulted in the formation of different particles’ size of apple powders influencing the bulk density of the products. The highest values of bulk density were indicated for powders obtained by vacuum drying due to the bigger size of the particles (crystalized structure). The porosity of apple juice powders was strictly related to the bulk density. Colour parameters of powders were more influenced by drying techniques than the quantity of maltodextrin (15% up to 35%) added. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Powder)
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Open AccessArticle Persistent Organochlorine Pesticide Residues in Some Selected Cocoa Beverages in Nigeria
Received: 8 October 2017 / Revised: 13 November 2017 / Accepted: 13 November 2017 / Published: 11 December 2017
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Abstract
This study evaluates the quality of the cocoa beverages produced in Nigeria with respect to the occurrence and levels of organochlorine pesticides OCPs residues in order to ascertain the potential health risks to the general public. Seven cocoa-based beverages were analysed for 17
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This study evaluates the quality of the cocoa beverages produced in Nigeria with respect to the occurrence and levels of organochlorine pesticides OCPs residues in order to ascertain the potential health risks to the general public. Seven cocoa-based beverages were analysed for 17 OCP residues using gas chromatography coupled with an Electron Captured Detector (GC-ECD) after extraction and silica-gel clean-up. The study reveals the presence of ten OCP residues in the cocoa beverages, with a concentration range from not detected ND—0.256 mg/kg, while α-BHC, β-BHC, methoxychlor, p,p′-DDE, dieldrin, endrin aldehyde, and endosulfan sulphate were not detected in any of the analysed samples. The contamination pattern of OCPs in the beverages was in the following order: Ovaltine > Milo > Cadbury-choco > Bournvita > Cowbell-coffee > Richoco > Oluji, with p,p′-DDT being the most frequently found pesticide. Heptachlor and endosulfan II showeda residual level above the European Union (EU) Maximum Residual Limits (MRLs) in only one sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Powder)
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Open AccessArticle Antioxidant Activity of Commercial Soluble Coffees
Received: 10 April 2017 / Revised: 14 June 2017 / Accepted: 15 June 2017 / Published: 21 June 2017
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Abstract
A product of easy preparation and high added value, soluble/instant coffee is obtained by drying the aqueous extract of roasted coffee and presents a high amount of bioactive compounds. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of 33 Brazilian
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A product of easy preparation and high added value, soluble/instant coffee is obtained by drying the aqueous extract of roasted coffee and presents a high amount of bioactive compounds. The aim of the study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of 33 Brazilian commercial soluble coffees considering the radical scavenging activity (via the ABTS method) and the reducing capacity (via the Folin–Ciocalteu method). Soluble coffees of several brands and types (regular, gourmet, and decaffeinated), subjected to different drying processes (agglomeration, atomization, and freeze-drying) (n = 85), were evaluated. In general, regular and decaffeinated soluble coffees presented high antioxidant activity. The reducing capacity ranged from 9.9 to 15.4 g of gallic acid per 100 g, while the radical scavenging activity ranged from 20.4 to 37.0 g of Trolox per 100 g. Good repeatability—with coefficients of variation of 2.4% for Folin–Ciocalteu and of 5.2% for ABTS—and high correlations between the values of antioxidant activity obtained by both methods (r = 0.66) were observed. Gourmet coffees presented less antioxidant activity compared to the regular samples. No correlation was verified between drying processes and antioxidant activity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Powder)
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Open AccessArticle Production of Nigella sativa Beverage Powder under Foam Mat Drying Using Egg Albumen as a Foaming Agent
Received: 20 October 2016 / Accepted: 17 January 2017 / Published: 27 January 2017
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of producing Nigella sativa powder under a foam mat drying technique. A central, composite design of experiments was used to optimize the drying condition and compare the solubility, the antioxidant and mineral content
[...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of producing Nigella sativa powder under a foam mat drying technique. A central, composite design of experiments was used to optimize the drying condition and compare the solubility, the antioxidant and mineral content of roasted Nigella sativa, and the foam mat dried Nigella sativa powder. Foams were prepared from Nigella sativa solution by adding different concentrations of egg albumen (2.5%, 8.75%, and 15% w/w) and methyl cellulose (0, 0.5% and 1% w/w), using whipping times of 2, 5, and 8 min. The drying temperature was set at 50–70 °C, with a foam thickness of 1, 2, and 3 mm. The optimum recorded conditions for the foaming process were 15% of egg albumen concentration, 0.69% of methyl cellulose concentration, and a whipping time of 8 min. Thus, the optimum conditions for the drying process were 60 °C, with 2 mm of foam thickness. The results showed that there were significant differences in DPPH inhibition, the total phenolic content, and mineral content, whereas no significant differences were recorded in the water solubility index between the roasted Nigella sativa and the foam mat dried Nigella sativa powder. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Beverage Powder)
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