Special Issue "Alcoholic Beverages Market"

A special issue of Beverages (ISSN 2306-5710).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jan Bentzen

Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University
Website | E-Mail
Interests: alcohol consumption analyses

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasing globalization and international trade, in recent decades, have had effects in the production and consumption patterns of beverages (Increasing supply and competition in the wine industry, as well as developments of concentrations in the beer markets, and probably similar challenges for spirits and soft drinks). Convergence in incomes have also been the case among a considerable number of countries and with subsequent influence on tastes and drinking patterns. In light of these issues, Beverages is launching a Special Issue addressing global trends in production and consumption patterns of beverages—which can include studies on specific beverages, as well as overall or general approaches to the topic. Developments in the near future in the global beverage markets will also be a relevant topic to address in this connection. This Special Issue is open for contributions from various scientific fields, e.g., technical sciences as well as social sciences and the arts.

Dr. Jan Bentzen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Beverages is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Structural Changes in the Consumption of Beer, Wine and Spirits in OECD Countries from 1961 to 2014
Received: 18 September 2017 / Revised: 11 December 2017 / Accepted: 4 January 2018 / Published: 22 January 2018
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Abstract
Alcohol consumption is usually measured as the simple sum of the per capita consumption of beer, wine and spirits in alcohol equivalents, i.e., assuming the specific beverages to be perfect substitutes. Alternatively, total alcohol consumption can be represented by a vector in the
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Alcohol consumption is usually measured as the simple sum of the per capita consumption of beer, wine and spirits in alcohol equivalents, i.e., assuming the specific beverages to be perfect substitutes. Alternatively, total alcohol consumption can be represented by a vector in the three-dimensional space of beer, wine and spirits, and the concept of angular separation is used to give a structural measurement of the beverage composition. Applying such a methodology, the aim of this paper is to analyse and explain structural changes in alcohol consumption among 21 OECD countries over the period from 1961 to 2014. Overall, the analyses suggest that convergence has taken place in the structural composition of alcohol consumption in the OECD countries. Income, the alcohol consumption level, trade openness and demographic factors are found to be drivers of this development during the last decades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages Market)
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Open AccessArticle Craftwashing in the U.S. Beer Industry
Received: 17 November 2017 / Revised: 1 December 2017 / Accepted: 11 December 2017 / Published: 26 December 2017
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Abstract
(1) Background: Big brewers, which have experienced declining sales for their beer brands in the last decade, have been accused of “craftwashing” by some craft brewers and their aficionados—they define craftwashing as big brewers (>6 million barrels per year) taking advantage of the
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(1) Background: Big brewers, which have experienced declining sales for their beer brands in the last decade, have been accused of “craftwashing” by some craft brewers and their aficionados—they define craftwashing as big brewers (>6 million barrels per year) taking advantage of the increasing sales of craft beer by emulating these products or by acquiring craft breweries, while also obscuring their ownership from consumers; (2) Methods: To estimate the prevalence of these practices, the ownership of U.S. mainstream and craft beer brands was decoded and visualized. In addition, an exploratory case study analyzed how these ownership relations are represented in the craft sections of selected retailers (n = 16) in the Lansing, Michigan metropolitan area; (3) Results: By October 2017 in the U.S., all but one big brewer had either acquired a craft brewery, or formed a distribution alliance with one—without disclosing these relationships on the packaging. In the study area, 30% of 4- and 6-pack facings recorded in craft beer sections (n = 1145) had ownership ties to big brewers; (4) Conclusions: Craftwashing is common in the U.S. beer industry, and this suggests consumers must exert substantial effort to become aware of their own role in reinforcing these practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages Market)
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Open AccessArticle In Vino Veritas? An Alternative Story of European Convergence
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 14 November 2017 / Accepted: 24 November 2017 / Published: 1 December 2017
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Abstract
While some European antagonists claim that united Europe is a utopia, grounded on mental and cultural discrepancies as well as aversion to changes of any kind, this paper challenges this cultural heterogeneity by looking at the history of the EU from the perspective
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While some European antagonists claim that united Europe is a utopia, grounded on mental and cultural discrepancies as well as aversion to changes of any kind, this paper challenges this cultural heterogeneity by looking at the history of the EU from the perspective of alcohol consumption and its development. By using WHO data over the last 50 years I show how consumption patterns of European countries evolved over time, in terms of volumes and composition of alcohol intake per-capita, outlining the major tendencies of the (converging) European market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Alcoholic Beverages Market)
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