Special Issue "Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries 2017"

A special issue of Batteries (ISSN 2313-0105).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2017

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Kwo Young

1. Department of Chemical Engineering and Material Sciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
2. BASF Battery Materials-Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309, USA
E-Mail
Interests: electrochemistry; rechargeable alkaline battery; hydrogen storage alloys; metal–air battery; solid-state battery; electric vehicle

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

MDPI has recently published a compilation of 20 papers summarizing the research efforts in improving the performance of nickel metal hydride (NiMH) batteries prior to 2016 in a single volume. To continue to serve the NiMH research community, we are planning to extend the effort to collect the NiMH-related papers in another coming volume—also a Special Issue of the same journal (Batteries). Papers of review, current research, and future planning in the materials, fabrication methods, cell integration and development, performance evaluation, failure analysis, market opportunities, and other subjects related to NiMH batteries are invited. Discussions and comments prior to manuscript submissions are also welcomed.

Dr. Kwo-Hsiung Young
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Batteries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • NiMH battery
  • electrochemical reaction
  • battery performance evaluation
  • hydrogen storage alloy
  • nickel hydroxide

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Fabrications of High-Capacity Alpha-Ni(OH)2
Batteries 2017, 3(1), 6; doi:10.3390/batteries3010006
Received: 10 January 2017 / Revised: 23 February 2017 / Accepted: 2 March 2017 / Published: 8 March 2017
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Abstract
Three different methods were used to produce α-Ni(OH)2 with higher discharge capacities than the conventional β-Ni(OH)2, specifically a batch process of co-precipitation, a continuous process of co-precipitation with a phase transformation step (initial cycling), and an overcharge at low temperature.
[...] Read more.
Three different methods were used to produce α-Ni(OH)2 with higher discharge capacities than the conventional β-Ni(OH)2, specifically a batch process of co-precipitation, a continuous process of co-precipitation with a phase transformation step (initial cycling), and an overcharge at low temperature. All three methods can produce α-Ni(OH)2 or α/β mixed-Ni(OH)2 with capacities higher than that of conventional β-Ni(OH)2 and a stable cycle performance. The second method produces a special core–shell β-Ni(OH)2/α-Ni(OH)2 structure with an excellent cycle stability in the flooded half-cell configuration, is innovative and also already mass-production ready. The core–shell structure has been investigated by both scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The shell portion of the particle is composed of α-Ni(OH)2 nano-crystals embedded in a β-Ni(OH)2 matrix, which helps to reduce the stress originating from the lattice expansion in the β-α transformation. A review on the research regarding α-Ni(OH)2 is also included in the paper. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Ionic Liquid-Based Non-Aqueous Electrolytes for Nickel/Metal Hydride Batteries
Batteries 2017, 3(1), 4; doi:10.3390/batteries3010004
Received: 9 November 2016 / Revised: 5 January 2017 / Accepted: 23 January 2017 / Published: 6 February 2017
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Abstract
The voltage of an alkaline electrolyte-based battery is often limited by the narrow electrochemical stability window of water (1.23 V). As an alternative to water, ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolyte has been shown to exhibit excellent proton conducting properties and a wide electrochemical stability
[...] Read more.
The voltage of an alkaline electrolyte-based battery is often limited by the narrow electrochemical stability window of water (1.23 V). As an alternative to water, ionic liquid (IL)-based electrolyte has been shown to exhibit excellent proton conducting properties and a wide electrochemical stability window, and can be used in proton conducting batteries. In this study, we used IL/acid mixtures to replace the 30 wt % KOH aqueous electrolyte in nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries, and verified the proton conducting character of these mixtures through electrochemical charge/discharge experiments. Dilution of ILs with acetic acid was found to effectively increase proton conductivity. By using 2 M acetic acid in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, stable charge/discharge characteristics were obtained, including low charge/discharge overpotentials, a discharge voltage plateau at ~1.2 V, a specific capacity of 161.9 mAh·g−1, and a stable cycling performance for an AB5 metal hydride anode with a (Ni,Co,Zn)(OH)2 cathode. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries 2017)
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Open AccessArticle Fe-Substitution for Ni in Misch Metal-Based Superlattice Hydrogen Absorbing Alloys—Part 1. Structural, Hydrogen Storage, and Electrochemical Properties
Batteries 2016, 2(4), 34; doi:10.3390/batteries2040034
Received: 19 October 2016 / Revised: 9 November 2016 / Accepted: 11 November 2016 / Published: 21 November 2016
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Abstract
The effects of Fe partially replacing Ni in a misch metal-based superlattice hydrogen absorbing alloy (HAA) were studied. Addition of Fe increases the lattice constants and abundance of the main Ce2Ni7 phase, decreases the NdNi3 phase abundance, and increases
[...] Read more.
The effects of Fe partially replacing Ni in a misch metal-based superlattice hydrogen absorbing alloy (HAA) were studied. Addition of Fe increases the lattice constants and abundance of the main Ce2Ni7 phase, decreases the NdNi3 phase abundance, and increases the CaCu5 phase when the Fe content is above 2.3 at%. For the gaseous phase hydrogen storage (H-storage), Fe incorporation does not change the storage capacity or equilibrium pressure, but it does decrease the change in both entropy and enthalpy. With regard to electrochemistry, >2.3 at% Fe decreases both the full and high-rate discharge capacities due to the deterioration in both bulk transport (caused by decreased secondary phase abundance and consequent lower synergetic effect) and surface electrochemical reaction (caused by the lower volume of the surface metallic Ni inclusions). In a low-temperature environment (−40 °C), although Fe increases the reactive surface area, it also severely hinders the ability of the surface catalytic, leading to a net increase in surface charge-transfer resistance. Even though Fe increases the abundance of the beneficial Ce2Ni7 phase with a trade-off for the relatively unfavorable NdNi3 phase, it also deteriorates the electrochemical performance due to a less active surface. Therefore, further surface treatment methods that are able to increase the surface catalytic ability in Fe-containing superlattice alloys and potentially reveal the positive contributions that Fe provides structurally are worth investigating in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries 2017)
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