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Special Issue "Land Carbon Sequestration and Climate: Present and Future"

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A special issue of Atmosphere (ISSN 2073-4433).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Robinson I. Negron-Juarez (Website)

Climate Sciences Department, Earth and Environmental Science Area, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA
Interests: Micrometeorology; Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry; Ecosystem Ecology; Global Change Research; Land-Atmosphere Interaction; Climate Modeling; Remote Sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Atmospheric CO2 concentrations have increased dramatically over the past 150 years, from a pre-industrial value of 280 ppm to nearly 400 ppm today, and are projected to increase to 500–1,000 ppm by 2100. This increase in atmospheric CO2 will result in increases in global temperature and dramatic changes in the Earth Climate system. Land ecosystems draw down atmospheric CO2 through photosynthesis, and therefore play a key role in mitigating the effects of increased CO2 on the climate. Understanding (i) the functionality of land ecosystems, (ii) their climate feedbacks, and (iii) the role they play as atmospheric carbon absorbers is therefore critical to a proper understanding of Earth’s future climate.

Studies that address these research topics in the context of present and future Land carbon sequestration-Climate are welcome for publication in Atmosphere. Studies that integrate field data, remote sensing data, and modeling are especially encouraged.

Dr. Robinson I. Negron-Juarez
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Atmosphere is an international peer-reviewed Open Access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs).

Keywords

  • land ecosystems
  • carbon sequestration
  • climate projections

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Biophysical Impacts of Land Use Change over North America as Simulated by the Canadian Regional Climate Model
Atmosphere 2016, 7(3), 34; doi:10.3390/atmos7030034
Received: 4 November 2015 / Revised: 11 February 2016 / Accepted: 19 February 2016 / Published: 26 February 2016
PDF Full-text (6127 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
This study investigates the biophysical impacts of human-induced land use change (LUC) on the regional climate of North America, using the fifth generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5). To this end, two simulations are performed with CRCM5 using different land cover datasets, [...] Read more.
This study investigates the biophysical impacts of human-induced land use change (LUC) on the regional climate of North America, using the fifth generation Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM5). To this end, two simulations are performed with CRCM5 using different land cover datasets, one corresponding to the potential vegetation and the other corresponding to current land use, spanning the 1988–2012 period, driven by European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA)-Interim at the lateral boundaries. Comparison of the two suggests higher albedo values, and therefore cooler temperatures, over the LUC regions, in the simulation with LUC, in winter. This is due to the absence of crops in winter, and also possibly due to a snow-mediated positive feedback. Some cooling is observed in summer for the simulation with LUC, mostly due to the higher latent heat fluxes and lower sensible heat fluxes over eastern US. Precipitation changes for these regions are not statistically significant. Analysis of the annual cycles for two LUC regions suggests that the impact of LUC on two meter temperature, evapotranspiration, soil moisture and precipitation are present year round. However, the impact on runoff is mostly restricted to the snowmelt season. This study thus highlights regions and variables most affected by LUC over North America. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Carbon Sequestration and Climate: Present and Future)
Open AccessArticle Carbon Sequestration and Carbon Markets for Tree-Based Intercropping Systems in Southern Quebec, Canada
Atmosphere 2016, 7(2), 17; doi:10.3390/atmos7020017
Received: 20 November 2015 / Revised: 19 January 2016 / Accepted: 22 January 2016 / Published: 28 January 2016
PDF Full-text (902 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Since agriculture directly contributes to global anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, integrating trees into agricultural landscapes through agroforestry systems is a viable adaptive strategy for climate change mitigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the carbon (C) sequestration and financial [...] Read more.
Since agriculture directly contributes to global anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, integrating trees into agricultural landscapes through agroforestry systems is a viable adaptive strategy for climate change mitigation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the carbon (C) sequestration and financial benefits of C sequestration according to Quebec’s Cap-and-Trade System for Greenhouse Gas Emissions Allowances (C & T System) or the Système de plafonnement et d’échange de droits d’émission de gaz à effet de serre du Québec (SPEDE) program for two experimental 10-year-old tree-based intercropping (TBI) systems in southern Quebec, Canada. We estimated total C stored in the two TBI systems with hybrid poplar and hardwoods and adjacent non-TBI systems under agricultural production, considering soil, crop and crop roots, litterfall, tree and tree roots as C stocks. The C sequestration of the TBI and adjacent non-TBI systems were compared and the market value of the C payment was evaluated using the net present value (NPV) approach. The TBI systems had 33% to 36% more C storage than adjacent non-TBI systems. The financial benefits of C sequestration after 10 years of TBI practices amounted to of $2,259–$2,758 CAD ha−1 and $1,568–$1,913 CAD ha−1 for St. Edouard and St. Paulin sites, respectively. We conclude that valorizing the C sequestration of TBI systems could be an incentive to promote the establishment of TBI for the purpose of GHG mitigation in Quebec, Canada. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Land Carbon Sequestration and Climate: Present and Future)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

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