Special Issue "Considering Black Womanhood: Representation in American Media, Arts, and Culture"

A special issue of Arts (ISSN 2076-0752).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Apryl Williams

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Susquehanna University, 514 University Avenue, Selinsgrove, PA 17870, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: cultural studies of race, gender, and community in digital spaces; mobile phone and digital technology use in developing countries
Guest Editor
Ms. Monica Prince, MFA

Creative Writing Fellow, Department of English and Creative Writing, Susquehanna University, 514 University Avenue, Selinsgrove, PA 17870, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: intersectionality; gender; sexuality; identity; race; culture; digital media impact; augmented reality; online dating; sex work; media convergence; art; emotional labor; invisibility and erasure; entertainment; performance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Black feminist scholars emphasize the relative invisibility of black women in media, regardless of their disproportionately high use of social media and consumption of entertainment. When we think of black women, we see them in everything—from being the highest educated group in America to being a consistent voting demographic in the last three major elections. Their presence is inescapable, but still somehow missing.

For this Special Issue, we invite submissions that reach beyond widely accepted cisgender heteronormative constructions of black womanhood including the changing nature of representations of black womanhood over the past few decades. Some questions to explore are: How do different media, including digital media, portray black women? What can be said about the representation of black women artists? How does sex work contribute to the discourse surrounding the hypersexualization of black women? Do black women exist in augmented reality? How does the performance of black womanhood intersect with other categories of identity? We are also interested in questions that deal with the racialized and sexualized labor of caring, silent classism in mainstream black social movements, black women and trauma, and black motherhood.

We invite you to critique, interrogate, and consider black womanhood in online spaces, television, film, popular culture, politics, journalism, art, and other experiences. Rather than simply describing a phenomenon, we encourage contributors to investigate both theoretical implications and the potential consequences within their respective disciplines and the broader international scholarly community.

We welcome any methodological approach from scholars across disciplines, including collaborators within and outside of their primary fields.

Dr. Apryl Williams
Ms. Monica Prince, MFA
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • intersectionality
  • culture
  • media
  • digital media
  • performance
  • invisibility and erasure

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessEssay D.S. Sense’s “On My Detroit Everything”: Self-Articulating Black Girl Magic
Received: 30 January 2018 / Revised: 21 March 2018 / Accepted: 17 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
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Abstract
Long before the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic was popularized on social network sites Black women in Detroit have been employing art in their processes of self-articulation and efforts to deal with the complexities and challenges of life in the city. The scripts of African American
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Long before the hashtag #BlackGirlMagic was popularized on social network sites Black women in Detroit have been employing art in their processes of self-articulation and efforts to deal with the complexities and challenges of life in the city. The scripts of African American women that dominate the commercial hip hop industry and their impacts on girls and women have received thorough analysis in academia; yet, the practices, representations, and discursive articulations of independent, Black women hip hop artists remain underexplored. In particular, this essay draws on Deidre “D.S. Sense” Smith’s spoken word poem “On My Detroit Everything” to illuminate the counter-narratives and scripts that Black women have been creating to document, validate, and voice their experiences at a critical point in Detroit’s history as it underwent and continues to deal with the after effects of bankruptcy. Hip hop artists who use cultural production to accomplish grass roots community-building offer alternative visions of what it means to do political work. More than a strategy, we argue that such practices serve as the foundation for a movement that is significant and worthy of documentation in the contemporary neoliberal moment where in policies are accelerating the continued disenfranchisement of people of color in cities such as Detroit. Full article
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