Special Issue "The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century)"

A special issue of Arts (ISSN 2076-0752). This special issue belongs to the section "Arts and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Ms. Juliette Bessette

PhD candidate, Centre André Chastel, Université Paris-Sorbonne, Galerie Colbert, 2 rue Vivienne, 75002 Paris, France
E-Mail
Interests: 20th-century art history; machine; science; technology; future studies; pop art
Editorial Assistant
Mr. G. W. Smith

Founder, Space Machines Corporation, 3443 Esplanade Avenue, Suite 438, New Orleans, LA 70119, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: art; arts and technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The machine, over the course of the 20th century, progressively integrated itself into all fields of human activity, including artistic creation; and indeed, with the first decades of that century having established a surprisingly vital and wide-ranging series of perspectives on the relationship between art and the machine, certain artists in the wake of the second world war no longer felt compelled to treat the machine as a mere theme or source of inspiration: the machine itself becomes art—unless it is art which seeks to become mechanical?

The artist mutates into artist-engineer; and this transition, resonating within a specific historical context, leads not only to a questioning of the nature of the work itself, but also to a broader questioning which places us within the realm of anthropology: what is this art telling us about the actual conditions of contemporary human society and what is it telling us about the future to which we aspire?

It is the goal of this special issue of Arts to stimulate an historically conscious, protean, and global (re)thinking of the cultural relationship between man and machine; and to this end, we welcome contributions falling anywhere within the nearly infinite spectrum represented by the prismatic period during the middle of the last century in which the machine became a legitimate artistic medium.

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La machine, au cours du XXe siècle, s’est progressivement constituée en élément majeur de notre civilisation jusqu’à véritablement s’intégrer à tous les domaines de l’activité humaine, création artistique comprise. Après que les premières décennies de ce siècle ont ouvert un large et stimulant champ de réflexion sur le rapport entre l’art et la machine, dans l’après seconde guerre mondiale, certains artistes ne considèrent plus cette machine comme un simple thème ou une source d’inspiration: ils font art de la technologie—à moins que ce ne soient les œuvres d’art qui deviennent, en elles-mêmes, machines?

L’artiste se mue en «artiste-ingénieur» et ce tournant fondamental, mis en résonance avec son contexte historique spécifique, entraîne une interrogation sur la nature-même de l’œuvre d’art. Elle débouche également sur un questionnement plus large, d’ordre anthropologique: que les œuvres d’art nous apprennent-elles sur la condition humaine qui nous est contemporaine, et sur celle à laquelle nous aspirons?

A travers ce numéro spécial d’Arts, nous souhaitons stimuler une réflexion rétrospective, protéiforme et libre permettant de (re)penser, de manière globale, la relation culturelle de l’homme à la machine. Pour ce faire, nous accueillons toute contribution explorant les différentes facettes du prisme infini reflétant les rapports établis entre la création artistique et la machine (en tant que médium) au cours de la période charnière du milieu du siècle dernier.

Ms. Juliette Bessette
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Arts is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • art
  • machine
  • science
  • technology
  • machine aesthetics
  • systems aesthetics
  • 20th century art history

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessEditorial Accepting the Machine: A Response by Liliane Lijn to Three Questions from Arts
Received: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 11 June 2018
PDF Full-text (1060 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Celebrated techno-art pioneer Liliane Lijn—whose participation in the landmark 1970 London “Kinetics” exhibition at the newly opened Hayward Gallery was but a waypoint in a long and adventurous career, and whose work is represented in the collections of Bern’s Kunstmuseum, MoMA, and Tate—has
[...] Read more.
Celebrated techno-art pioneer Liliane Lijn—whose participation in the landmark 1970 London “Kinetics” exhibition at the newly opened Hayward Gallery was but a waypoint in a long and adventurous career, and whose work is represented in the collections of Bern’s Kunstmuseum, MoMA, and Tate—has prepared this essay on the evolution of machine art in response to three questions from G.W. Smith and Juliette Bessette of Arts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
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Open AccessNew Book Received The Original “Cybernetic Serendipity” Special Issue of Studio International to Be Reprinted
Received: 27 March 2018 / Revised: 27 March 2018 / Accepted: 29 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
PDF Full-text (4680 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Studio International (Studio International 2018), the now on-line successor to print art magazine The Studio, is planning a late April 2018 50th anniversary reprinting of its Special Issue dedicated to the historic 1968 “Cybernetic Serendipity” techno-art exhibition (Benavides 2018a)[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
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Open AccessEssay The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century): An Introduction
Received: 2 November 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 December 2017 / Published: 23 January 2018
PDF Full-text (655 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The machine, over the course of the 20th century, progressively integrated itself into all fields of human activity, including artistic creation; and indeed, with the first decades of that century having established a surprisingly vital and wide-ranging series of perspectives on the relationship
[...] Read more.
The machine, over the course of the 20th century, progressively integrated itself into all fields of human activity, including artistic creation; and indeed, with the first decades of that century having established a surprisingly vital and wide-ranging series of perspectives on the relationship between art and the machine, certain artists in the wake of the Second World War no longer felt compelled to treat the machine as a mere theme or source of inspiration: the machine itself becomes art—unless it is art which seeks to become mechanical? The artist mutates into “artist-engineer”; and this transition, resonating within a specific historical context, leads not only to a questioning of the nature of the work itself, but also to a broader questioning which places us within the realm of anthropology: what is this art telling us about the actual conditions of contemporary human society, and what is it telling us about the future to which we aspire? It is the goal of this special issue of Arts to stimulate an historically conscious, protean, and global (re)thinking of the cultural relationship between man and machine; and to this end, we welcome contributions falling anywhere within the nearly infinite spectrum represented by the prismatic period during the middle of the last century in which the machine became a legitimate artistic medium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Machine as Art (in the 20th Century))
Figures

Figure 1

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