Special Issue "Microfluidics in Biology and Medicine"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Rangadhar Pradhan

Center of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee, India-247667
E-Mail
Interests: electrochemical sensors; cell-based sensors; bioimpedance; microfluidics in biomedical applications
Guest Editor
Prof. Fan-Gang Tseng

Department of Engineering and System Science, Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, ROC-30013
Website | E-Mail
Interests: MEMS/NEMS; microfluidics; 3D tissue culture; electrochemical sensors; nanotechnology in biomedical applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 21st International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS 2017) will be held at the Savannah International Trade and Conference Center in Savannah, Georgia, USA, 22-26 October, 2017.

MicroTAS 2017 continues a series of conferences that are the premier forum for reporting research results in microfluidics, microfabrication, nanotechnology, integration, materials and surfaces, analysis and synthesis, and detection technologies for life science and chemistry. The conference offers plenary talks, as well as contributed oral presentations and posters selected from submitted abstracts.

The foremost aim of this Special Issue is to publish research results on "Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS)";. The eventual endeavor is to find new scientific comprehensions related to study of microfluidics and nanotechnology in relation to chemistry and biomedical sciences. We invite scientists and professors to submit their papers to this Special Issue on one of the following topics:

  1. Biosensors and bio-detection technologies

  2. Cells, tissues, and organs-on-a-chip

  3. Biomedical diagnostics and therapeutics

  4. Microfluidics in biomedical engineering

Dr. Rangadhar Pradhan
Prof. Fan-Gang Tseng
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomicrofluidics

  • Biosensors

  • Organ on chip

  • Diagnostics

  • Therapeutics

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Low-Cost Inkjet-Printed Paper-Based Potentiostat
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(6), 968; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8060968
Received: 15 May 2018 / Revised: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 5 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
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Abstract
The work presented details the manufacturing of a low-cost hybrid inkjet-printed paper-based potentiostat, with the aim of creating a low-cost sensing system for rapid water quality monitoring. Potentiostats exhibit high sensitivities and can be used for a variety of applications. The results highlight
[...] Read more.
The work presented details the manufacturing of a low-cost hybrid inkjet-printed paper-based potentiostat, with the aim of creating a low-cost sensing system for rapid water quality monitoring. Potentiostats exhibit high sensitivities and can be used for a variety of applications. The results highlight the functionality of a paper-based potentiostat compared to a potentiostat manufactured on a printed circuit board (PCB), an LMP91000EVM development board and a laboratory-based Metrohm Autolab potentiostat. Cyclic voltammetry was performed using an 80 µL sample of 5 mM ferri-ferrocyanide dropped onto a commercial screen-printed electrode from DropSens. The miniaturized paper-based potentiostat is small enough to be stored in a wallet and therefore easy to transport. Furthermore, a cost analysis shows that the potentiostat is 10 times lower in cost than the commercially available handheld potentiostat, taking the costs of man hours into account. This technology enables electrochemistry experiments to be performed on-site using the portable, disposable and low-cost solution and can be applied to a variety of fields including healthcare, wearables and environmental monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics in Biology and Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle A 3D Printed Membrane-Based Gas Microflow Regulator for On-Chip Cell Culture
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(4), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8040579
Received: 27 February 2018 / Revised: 29 March 2018 / Accepted: 3 April 2018 / Published: 8 April 2018
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Abstract
A miniature 3D printed membrane-based gas microflow regulator which delivers gaseous media to on-chip cell cultures is presented in this paper. The device uses a polydimethylosiloxane (PDMS) membrane to act as a diffusion barrier and maintain gas flow at the desired rate. The
[...] Read more.
A miniature 3D printed membrane-based gas microflow regulator which delivers gaseous media to on-chip cell cultures is presented in this paper. The device uses a polydimethylosiloxane (PDMS) membrane to act as a diffusion barrier and maintain gas flow at the desired rate. The regulator was characterized, and repeatable flow values for different membrane thicknesses and gas types in the function of pressure were obtained. As a result, a long-term on-chip culture of Euglena gracilis was achieved, this was due to constant and stable carbon dioxide release from the regulator (flow rate: 0.3 μL/min). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics in Biology and Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle Large Scale Imaging by Fine Spatial Alignment of Multi-Scanning Data with Gel Cube Device
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 235; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8020235
Received: 10 January 2018 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 1 February 2018 / Published: 4 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (3031 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In vitro three-dimensional (3D) culturing is considered essential in many biological fields. However, the imaging of developed 3D formations is often difficult, especially if the size of the sample is relatively large. The z-resolution of fluorescent imaging is low using low magnification
[...] Read more.
In vitro three-dimensional (3D) culturing is considered essential in many biological fields. However, the imaging of developed 3D formations is often difficult, especially if the size of the sample is relatively large. The z-resolution of fluorescent imaging is low using low magnification lenses (4× and 10×) due to large focal depths. This paper describes 3D culture platform enabling large scale 3D imaging by fine spatial alignment of the image dataset obtained from multiple directions. A gel cube device was employed to conduct the multi-scanning and then a self-fluorescent microstructure in a cubic frame allows us spatially align image dataset within a few pixels. By synthesizing data from multiple scans, the platform enables us to visualize millimeter-sized 3D sample structure and individual cellular actin filaments at the same time. Millimeter depth imaging of a developed bronchial tree was achieved with high z-resolution. The device, which is applicable to most microscopy systems, can enhance the image quality without modifying current systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics in Biology and Medicine)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Gelatin-Enabled Microsensor for Pancreatic Trypsin Sensing
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(2), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8020208
Received: 21 December 2017 / Revised: 22 January 2018 / Accepted: 28 January 2018 / Published: 31 January 2018
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Abstract
Digestive health is critically dependent on the secretion of enzymes from the exocrine pancreas to the duodenum via the pancreatic duct. Specifically, pancreatic trypsin is a major protease responsible for breaking down proteins for absorption in the small intestine. Gelatin-based hydrogels, deposited in
[...] Read more.
Digestive health is critically dependent on the secretion of enzymes from the exocrine pancreas to the duodenum via the pancreatic duct. Specifically, pancreatic trypsin is a major protease responsible for breaking down proteins for absorption in the small intestine. Gelatin-based hydrogels, deposited in the form of thin films, have been studied as potential sensor substrates that hydrolyze in the presence of trypsin. In this work, we (1) investigate gelatin as a sensing material; (2) develop a fabrication strategy for coating sensor surfaces; and (3) implement a miniaturized impedance platform for measuring activity levels of pancreatic trypsin. Using impedance spectroscopy, we evaluate gelatin’s specificity and rate of degradation when exposed to a combination of pancreatic enzymes in neutral solution representative of the macromolecular heterogeneity present in the duodenal environment. Our findings suggest gelatin’s preferential degradation to trypsin compared to enzymes such as lipase and amylase. We further observe their interference with trypsin behavior in equivalent concentrations, reducing film digestion by as much as 83% and 77%, respectively. We achieve film patterns in thicknesses ranging from 300–700 nm, which we coat over interdigitated finger electrode sensors. Finally, we test our sensors over several concentrations to emulate the range of pancreatic secretions. Ultimately, our microsensor will serve as the foundation for developing in situ sensors toward diagnosing pancreatic pathologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics in Biology and Medicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Microfluidic Technology for Cell Manipulation
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(6), 992; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8060992
Received: 26 April 2018 / Revised: 8 June 2018 / Accepted: 14 June 2018 / Published: 17 June 2018
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Abstract
Microfluidic techniques for cell manipulation have been constantly developed and integrated into small chips for high-performance bioassays. However, the drawbacks of each of the techniques often hindered their further advancement and their wide use in biotechnology. To overcome this difficulty, an examination and
[...] Read more.
Microfluidic techniques for cell manipulation have been constantly developed and integrated into small chips for high-performance bioassays. However, the drawbacks of each of the techniques often hindered their further advancement and their wide use in biotechnology. To overcome this difficulty, an examination and understanding of various aspects of the developed manipulation techniques are required. In this review, we provide the details of primary microfluidic techniques that have received much attention for bioassays. First, we introduce the manipulation techniques using a sole driving source, i.e., dielectrophoresis, electrophoresis, optical tweezers, magnetophoresis, and acoustophoresis. Next, we present rapid electrokinetic patterning, a hybrid opto-electric manipulation technique developed recently. It is introduced in detail along with the underlying physical principle, operating environment, and current challenges. This paper will offer readers the opportunity to improve existing manipulation techniques, suggest new manipulation techniques, and find new applications in biotechnology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microfluidics in Biology and Medicine)
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