Special Issue "Combination of Western and Chinese Medicine in Veterinary Science"

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A special issue of Animals (ISSN 2076-2615).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2012)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Christine M. Egger
Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, The University of Tennessee, 2407 River Drive, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA
Website: http://www.vet.utk.edu/faculty/egger.php
E-Mail: cegger@utk.edu
Interests: anesthesiology (all species); pain management; acupuncture; Chinese herbal therapy

Guest Editor
Dr. Bonnie D. Wright
Veterinary Emergency and Rehabilitation Hospital, 816 South Lemay Avenue, Fort Collins, CO 80521, USA
Website: http://www.veterinaryemergencyhospital.net/site/view/137742_BonnieWright.pml
E-Mail: mistralvet@gmail.com
Interests: veterinary anesthesiology; pain management; acupuncture

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasingly, alternative or complementary medicine modalities are incorporated into the practice of "western" veterinary medicine and the practice of integrated veterinary medicine is becoming more common. At the same time, the practice of evidence-based medicine is encouraged and expected of scientists and clinicians. While there is value in anecdotal evidence and expert opinion, data from peer reviewed basic research and double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials evaluating integrative medicine is accumulating. The publication of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in veterinary patients will soon be possible. This scientific evidence will aid us in understanding alternative modalities, assessing their value, and making rational clinical decisions for our patients.

The integration of acupuncture therapy into the treatment ofveterinary patients is meant to complement the "western" medicine modalities, resulting in a better outcome for the patient with fewer adverse affects. Acupuncture is a modality that is used to treat numerous conditions in both human and veterinary medicine. Modern rehabilitation medicine commonly uses acupuncture and myofascial trigger point therapy to reduce pain, promote healing, and hasten recovery.

The motivation for this special issue of Animals is to explore the evidence for the value of integration of acupuncture in the treatment of disease or trauma in veterinary patients. Manuscripts of original research and review articles will be peer-reviewed and should assess the value of integrating acupuncture into the treatment of pain, trauma, gastrointestinal, neurological, cardiovascular, or renal disease in veterinary patients.

Prof. Dr. Christine M. Egger
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • horses
  • companion animals
  • food animals
  • neurological disease
  • gastrointestinal disease
  • renal disease
  • cardiovascular disease
  • trauma
  • acupuncture
  • herbal therapy

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Displaying article 1-5
p. 158-227
by ,  and
Animals 2013, 3(1), 158-227; doi:10.3390/ani3010158
Received: 4 January 2013; in revised form: 6 February 2013 / Accepted: 7 February 2013 / Published: 4 March 2013
Show/Hide Abstract | Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (330 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Combination of Western and Chinese Medicine in Veterinary Science)
p. 455-471
by  and
Animals 2012, 2(3), 455-471; doi:10.3390/ani2030455
Received: 30 July 2012; in revised form: 31 August 2012 / Accepted: 10 September 2012 / Published: 17 September 2012
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Combination of Western and Chinese Medicine in Veterinary Science)
p. 426-436
by , ,  and
Animals 2012, 2(3), 426-436; doi:10.3390/ani2030426
Received: 31 May 2012; in revised form: 24 August 2012 / Accepted: 29 August 2012 / Published: 4 September 2012
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Combination of Western and Chinese Medicine in Veterinary Science)
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p. 415-425
by ,  and
Animals 2012, 2(3), 415-425; doi:10.3390/ani2030415
Received: 31 May 2012; in revised form: 15 August 2012 / Accepted: 17 August 2012 / Published: 30 August 2012
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Combination of Western and Chinese Medicine in Veterinary Science)
p. 395-414
by
Animals 2012, 2(3), 395-414; doi:10.3390/ani2030395
Received: 4 July 2012; in revised form: 26 July 2012 / Accepted: 6 August 2012 / Published: 29 August 2012
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Last update: 20 February 2014

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