Open AccessReview
Mass Spectrometric Studies of Apolipoprotein Proteoforms and Their Role in Lipid Metabolism and Type 2 Diabetes
Proteomes 2017, 5(4), 27; doi:10.3390/proteomes5040027 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Apolipoproteins function as structural components of lipoprotein particles, cofactors for enzymes, and ligands for cell-surface receptors. Most of the apoliporoteins exhibit proteoforms, arising from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation, oxidation, and sequence truncations. Reviewed here are recent studies
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Apolipoproteins function as structural components of lipoprotein particles, cofactors for enzymes, and ligands for cell-surface receptors. Most of the apoliporoteins exhibit proteoforms, arising from single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and post-translational modifications such as glycosylation, oxidation, and sequence truncations. Reviewed here are recent studies correlating apolipoproteins proteoforms with the specific clinical measures of lipid metabolism and cardiometabolic risk. Targeted mass spectrometric immunoassays toward apolipoproteins A-I, A-II, and C-III were applied on large cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical cohorts. Several correlations were observed, including greater apolipoprotein A-I and A-II oxidation in patients with diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and a divergent apoC-III proteoforms association with plasma triglycerides, indicating significant differences in the metabolism of the individual apoC-III proteoforms. These are the first studies of their kind, correlating specific proteoforms with clinical measures in order to determine their utility as potential clinical biomarkers for disease diagnosis, risk stratification, and therapy decisions. Such studies provide the impetus for the further development and clinical translation of MS-based protein tests. Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Proteogenomics in Aid of Host–Pathogen Interaction Studies: A Bacterial Perspective
Proteomes 2017, 5(4), 26; doi:10.3390/proteomes5040026 -
Abstract
By providing useful tools to study host–pathogen interactions, next-generation omics has recently enabled the study of gene expression changes in both pathogen and infected host simultaneously. However, since great discriminative power is required to study pathogen and host simultaneously throughout the infection process,
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By providing useful tools to study host–pathogen interactions, next-generation omics has recently enabled the study of gene expression changes in both pathogen and infected host simultaneously. However, since great discriminative power is required to study pathogen and host simultaneously throughout the infection process, the depth of quantitative gene expression profiling has proven to be unsatisfactory when focusing on bacterial pathogens, thus preferentially requiring specific strategies or the development of novel methodologies based on complementary omics approaches. In this review, we focus on the difficulties encountered when making use of proteogenomics approaches to study bacterial pathogenesis. In addition, we review different omics strategies (i.e., transcriptomics, proteomics and secretomics) and their applications for studying interactions of pathogens with their host. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Differential Proteome Analysis of Extracellular Vesicles from Breast Cancer Cell Lines by Chaperone Affinity Enrichment
Proteomes 2017, 5(4), 25; doi:10.3390/proteomes5040025 -
Abstract
The complexity of human tissue fluid precludes timely identification of cancer biomarkers by immunoassay or mass spectrometry. An increasingly attractive strategy is to primarily enrich extracellular vesicles (EVs) released from cancer cells in an accelerated manner compared to normal cells. The Vn96 peptide
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The complexity of human tissue fluid precludes timely identification of cancer biomarkers by immunoassay or mass spectrometry. An increasingly attractive strategy is to primarily enrich extracellular vesicles (EVs) released from cancer cells in an accelerated manner compared to normal cells. The Vn96 peptide was herein employed to recover a subset of EVs released into the media from cellular models of breast cancer. Vn96 has affinity for heat shock proteins (HSPs) decorating the surface of EVs. Reflecting their cells of origin, cancer EVs displayed discrete differences from those of normal phenotype. GELFrEE LC/MS identified an extensive proteome from all three sources of EVs, the vast majority having been previously reported in the ExoCarta database. Pathway analysis of the Vn96-affinity proteome unequivocally distinguished EVs from tumorigenic cell lines (SKBR3 and MCF-7) relative to a non-tumorigenic source (MCF-10a), particularly with regard to altered metabolic enzymes, signaling, and chaperone proteins. The protein data sets provide valuable information from material shed by cultured cells. It is probable that a vast amount of biomarker identities may be collected from established and primary cell cultures using the approaches described here. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Performance of a Multiplex Serological Helicobacter pylori Assay on a Novel Microfluidic Assay Platform
Proteomes 2017, 5(4), 24; doi:10.3390/proteomes5040024 -
Abstract
Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) occurs in 50% of the world population, and is associated with the development of ulcer and gastric cancer. Serological diagnostic tests indicate an H. pylori infection by detecting antibodies directed against H. pylori proteins. In
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Infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) occurs in 50% of the world population, and is associated with the development of ulcer and gastric cancer. Serological diagnostic tests indicate an H. pylori infection by detecting antibodies directed against H. pylori proteins. In addition to line blots, multiplex assay platforms provide smart solutions for the simultaneous analysis of antibody responses towards several H. pylori proteins. We used seven H. pylori proteins (FliD, gGT, GroEL, HpaA, CagA, VacA, and HP0231) and an H. pylori lysate for the development of a multiplex serological assay on a novel microfluidic platform. The reaction limited binding regime in the microfluidic channels allows for a short incubation time of 35 min. The developed assay showed very high sensitivity (99%) and specificity (100%). Besides sensitivity and specificity, the technical validation (intra-assay CV = 3.7 ± 1.2% and inter-assay CV = 5.5 ± 1.2%) demonstrates that our assay is also a robust tool for the analysis of the H. pylori-specific antibody response. The integration of the virulence factors CagA and VacA allow for the assessment of the risk for gastric cancer development. The short assay time and the performance of the platform shows the potential for implementation of such assays in a clinical setting. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Interaction of Recombinant Gallus gallus SEPT5 and Brain Proteins of H5N1-Avian Influenza Virus-Infected Chickens
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 23; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030023 -
Abstract
Septin forms a conserved family of cytoskeletal guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins that have diverse roles in protein scaffolding, vesicle trafficking, and cytokinesis. The involvement of septins in infectious viral disease pathogenesis has been demonstrated by the upregulation of SEPT5 protein and its
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Septin forms a conserved family of cytoskeletal guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding proteins that have diverse roles in protein scaffolding, vesicle trafficking, and cytokinesis. The involvement of septins in infectious viral disease pathogenesis has been demonstrated by the upregulation of SEPT5 protein and its mRNA in brain tissues of H5N1-infected chickens, thus, providing evidence for the potential importance of this protein in the pathogenesis of neurovirulence caused by the avian influenza virus. In this study, cloning, expression, and purification of Gallus gallus SEPT5 protein was performed in Escherichia coli. The SEPT5 gene was inserted into the pRSETB expression vector, transformed in the E. coli BL21 (DE3) strain and the expression of SEPT5 protein was induced by IPTG. The SEPT5 protein was shown to be authentic as it was able to be pulled down by a commercial anti-SEPT5 antibody in a co-immunoprecipitation assay. In vivo aggregation of the recombinant protein was limited by cultivation at a reduced temperature of 16 °C. Using co-immunoprecipitation techniques, the purified recombinant SEPT5 protein was used to pull down host’s interacting or binding proteins, i.e., proteins of brains of chickens infected with the H5N1 influenza virus. Interacting proteins, such as CRMP2, tubulin proteins, heat-shock proteins and other classes of septins were identified using LCMS/MS. Results from this study suggest that the codon-optimized SEPT5 gene can be efficiently expressed in the E. coli bacterial system producing authentic SEPT5 protein, thus, enabling multiple host’s proteins to interact with the SEPT5 protein. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Microsomal Proteomics View of H2O2- and ABA-Dependent Responses
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 22; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030022 -
Abstract
The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) modulates a number of plant developmental processes and responses to stress. In planta, ABA has been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through the action of plasma membrane-associated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidases. Although quantitative
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The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) modulates a number of plant developmental processes and responses to stress. In planta, ABA has been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production through the action of plasma membrane-associated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-oxidases. Although quantitative proteomics studies have been performed to identify ABA- or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent proteins, little is known about the ABA- and H2O2-dependent microsomal proteome changes. Here, we examined the effect of 50 µM of either H2O2 or ABA on the Arabidopsis microsomal proteome using tandem mass spectrometry and identified 86 specifically H2O2-dependent, and 52 specifically ABA-dependent proteins that are differentially expressed. We observed differential accumulation of proteins involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle notably in response to H2O2. Of these, aconitase 3 responded to both H2O2 and ABA. Additionally, over 30 proteins linked to RNA biology responded significantly to both treatments. Gene ontology categories such as ‘response to stress’ and ‘transport’ were enriched, suggesting that H2O2 or ABA directly and/or indirectly cause complex and partly overlapping cellular responses. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006513. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Role of Salivary Biomarkers in Detection of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD)
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 21; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030021 -
Abstract
Human whole mouth saliva (WMS) is secreted by salivary glands, namely parotid, submandibular/sublingual and other minor glands of the oral cavity. It is secreted in a systematic way, and contain informative proteins and peptides for the early detection of contagious diseases and organ-related
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Human whole mouth saliva (WMS) is secreted by salivary glands, namely parotid, submandibular/sublingual and other minor glands of the oral cavity. It is secreted in a systematic way, and contain informative proteins and peptides for the early detection of contagious diseases and organ-related diseases. The role of WMS as a liquid biopsy for the detection of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) through Myoglobin (MYO), Cardiac troponin I (cTnI), Creatine phosphokinase MB (CK-MB), Myeloperoxidase (MPO), brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), Exosomal miRNA, C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP-8), MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of MMP-8 (TIMP-1), leukotriene B4 has been well reported in last decade, that have been reviewed in the literature comprehensively below. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
mzStudio: A Dynamic Digital Canvas for User-Driven Interrogation of Mass Spectrometry Data
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 20; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030020 -
Abstract
Although not yet truly ‘comprehensive’, modern mass spectrometry-based experiments can generate quantitative data for a meaningful fraction of the human proteome. Importantly for large-scale protein expression analysis, robust data pipelines are in place for identification of un-modified peptide sequences and aggregation of these
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Although not yet truly ‘comprehensive’, modern mass spectrometry-based experiments can generate quantitative data for a meaningful fraction of the human proteome. Importantly for large-scale protein expression analysis, robust data pipelines are in place for identification of un-modified peptide sequences and aggregation of these data to protein-level quantification. However, interoperable software tools that enable scientists to computationally explore and document novel hypotheses for peptide sequence, modification status, or fragmentation behavior are not well-developed. Here, we introduce mzStudio, an open-source Python module built on our multiplierz project. This desktop application provides a highly-interactive graphical user interface (GUI) through which scientists can examine and annotate spectral features, re-search existing PSMs to test different modifications or new spectral matching algorithms, share results with colleagues, integrate other domain-specific software tools, and finally create publication-quality graphics. mzStudio leverages our common application programming interface (mzAPI) for access to native data files from multiple instrument platforms, including ion trap, quadrupole time-of-flight, Orbitrap, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization, and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers and is compatible with several popular search engines including Mascot, Proteome Discoverer, X!Tandem, and Comet. The mzStudio toolkit enables researchers to create a digital provenance of data analytics and other evidence that support specific peptide sequence assignments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Combination of Histological, Physiological, and Proteomic Approaches Shed Light on Seed Desiccation Tolerance of the Basal Angiosperm Amborella trichopoda
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 19; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030019 -
Abstract
Desiccation tolerance allows plant seeds to remain viable in a dry state for years and even centuries. To reveal potential evolutionary processes of this trait, we have conducted a shotgun proteomic analysis of isolated embryo and endosperm from mature seeds of Amborella trichopoda
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Desiccation tolerance allows plant seeds to remain viable in a dry state for years and even centuries. To reveal potential evolutionary processes of this trait, we have conducted a shotgun proteomic analysis of isolated embryo and endosperm from mature seeds of Amborella trichopoda, an understory shrub endemic to New Caledonia that is considered to be the basal extant angiosperm. The present analysis led to the characterization of 415 and 69 proteins from the isolated embryo and endosperm tissues, respectively. The role of these proteins is discussed in terms of protein evolution and physiological properties of the rudimentary, underdeveloped, Amborella embryos, notably considering that the acquisition of desiccation tolerance corresponds to the final developmental stage of mature seeds possessing large embryos. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Editorial for Special Issue: Approaches to Top-Down Proteomics: In Honour of Prof. Patrick H. O’Farrell
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 18; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030018 -
Abstract
Presaging the current discipline of Proteomics, Prof Patrick H. O’Farrell recognized the critical need for detailed protein analyses to dissect and thereby understand molecular mechanisms. [...]
Full article
Open AccessReview
Tissue Specific Labeling in Proteomics
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 17; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030017 -
Abstract
Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a powerful tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in biological samples. While it is routinely used for the characterization of simple cell line systems, the analysis of the cell specific proteome in multicellular organisms and tissues poses a significant
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Mass spectrometry-based proteomics is a powerful tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in biological samples. While it is routinely used for the characterization of simple cell line systems, the analysis of the cell specific proteome in multicellular organisms and tissues poses a significant challenge. Isolating a subset of cells from tissues requires mechanical and biochemical separation or sorting, a process which can alter cellular signaling, and thus, the composition of the proteome. Recently, several approaches for cell selective labeling of proteins, that include bioorthogonal amino acids, biotinylating enzymes, and genetic tools, have been developed. These tools facilitate the selective labeling of proteins, their interactome, or of specific cell types within a tissue or an organism, while avoiding the difficult and contamination-prone biochemical separation of cells from the tissue. In this review, we give an overview of existing techniques and their application in cell culture models and whole animals. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Exogenous Auxin Elicits Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Root Proteome in a Time-Dependent Manner
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 16; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030016 -
Abstract
Auxin is involved in many aspects of root development and physiology, including the formation of lateral roots. Improving our understanding of how the auxin response is mediated at the protein level over time can aid in developing a more complete molecular framework of
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Auxin is involved in many aspects of root development and physiology, including the formation of lateral roots. Improving our understanding of how the auxin response is mediated at the protein level over time can aid in developing a more complete molecular framework of the process. This study evaluates the effects of exogenous auxin treatment on the Arabidopsis root proteome after exposure of young seedlings to auxin for 8, 12, and 24 h, a timeframe permitting the initiation and full maturation of individual lateral roots. Root protein extracts were processed to peptides, fractionated using off-line strong-cation exchange, and analyzed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography and data independent acquisition-based mass spectrometry. Protein abundances were then tabulated using label-free techniques and evaluated for significant changes. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified during the time course experiment, with the number of differences between the treated and control roots increasing over the 24 h time period, with more proteins found at higher abundance with exposure to auxin than at reduced abundance. Although the proteins identified and changing in levels at each time point represented similar biological processes, each time point represented a distinct snapshot of the response. Auxin coordinately regulates many physiological events in roots and does so by influencing the accumulation and loss of distinct proteins in a time-dependent manner. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with the identifier PXD001400. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Retrospective Proteomic Screening of 100 Breast Cancer Tissues
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 15; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030015 -
Abstract
The present investigation has been conducted on one hundred tissue fragments of breast cancer, collected and immediately cryopreserved following the surgical resection. The specimens were selected from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, the most frequent and potentially aggressive type of
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The present investigation has been conducted on one hundred tissue fragments of breast cancer, collected and immediately cryopreserved following the surgical resection. The specimens were selected from patients with invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast, the most frequent and potentially aggressive type of mammary cancer, with the objective to increase the knowledge of breast cancer molecular markers potentially useful for clinical applications. The proteomic screening; by 2D-IPG and mass spectrometry; allowed us to identify two main classes of protein clusters: proteins expressed ubiquitously at high levels in all patients; and proteins expressed sporadically among the same patients. Within the group of ubiquitous proteins, glycolytic enzymes and proteins with anti-apoptotic activity were predominant. Among the sporadic ones, proteins involved in cell motility, molecular chaperones and proteins involved in the detoxification appeared prevalent. The data of the present study indicates that the primary tumor growth is reasonably supported by concurrent events: the inhibition of apoptosis and stimulation of cellular proliferation, and the increased expression of glycolytic enzymes with multiple functions. The second phase of the evolution of the tumor can be prematurely scheduled by the occasional presence of proteins involved in cell motility and in the defenses of the oxidative stress. We suggest that this approach on large-scale 2D-IPG proteomics of breast cancer is currently a valid tool that offers the opportunity to evaluate on the same assay the presence and recurrence of individual proteins, their isoforms and short forms, to be proposed as prognostic indicators and susceptibility to metastasis in patients operated on for invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparison between Proteome and Transcriptome Response in Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Leaves Following Potato Virus Y (PVY) Infection
Proteomes 2017, 5(3), 14; doi:10.3390/proteomes5030014 -
Abstract
Plant diseases caused by viral infection are affecting all major crops. Being an obligate intracellular organisms, chemical control of these pathogens is so far not applied in the field except to control the insect vectors of the viruses. Understanding of molecular responses of
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Plant diseases caused by viral infection are affecting all major crops. Being an obligate intracellular organisms, chemical control of these pathogens is so far not applied in the field except to control the insect vectors of the viruses. Understanding of molecular responses of plant immunity is therefore economically important, guiding the enforcement of crop resistance. To disentangle complex regulatory mechanisms of the plant immune responses, understanding system as a whole is a must. However, integrating data from different molecular analysis (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, smallRNA regulation etc.) is not straightforward. We evaluated the response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) following the infection with potato virus Y (PVY). The response has been analyzed on two molecular levels, with microarray transcriptome analysis and mass spectroscopy-based proteomics. Within this report, we performed detailed analysis of the results on both levels and compared two different approaches for analysis of proteomic data (spectral count versus MaxQuant). To link the data on different molecular levels, each protein was mapped to the corresponding potato transcript according to StNIB paralogue grouping. Only 33% of the proteins mapped to microarray probes in a one-to-one relation and additionally many showed discordance in detected levels of proteins with corresponding transcripts. We discussed functional importance of true biological differences between both levels and showed that the reason for the discordance between transcript and protein abundance lies partly in complexity and structure of biological regulation of proteome and transcriptome and partly in technical issues contributing to it. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Routine ‘Top-Down’ Approach to Analysis of the Human Serum Proteome
Proteomes 2017, 5(2), 13; doi:10.3390/proteomes5020013 -
Abstract
Serum provides a rich source of potential biomarker proteoforms. One of the major obstacles in analysing serum proteomes is detecting lower abundance proteins owing to the presence of hyper-abundant species (e.g., serum albumin and immunoglobulins). Although depletion methods have been used to address
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Serum provides a rich source of potential biomarker proteoforms. One of the major obstacles in analysing serum proteomes is detecting lower abundance proteins owing to the presence of hyper-abundant species (e.g., serum albumin and immunoglobulins). Although depletion methods have been used to address this, these can lead to the concomitant removal of non-targeted protein species, and thus raise issues of specificity, reproducibility, and the capacity for meaningful quantitative analyses. Altering the native stoichiometry of the proteome components may thus yield a more complex series of issues than dealing directly with the inherent complexity of the sample. Hence, here we targeted method refinements so as to ensure optimum resolution of serum proteomes via a top down two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) approach that enables the routine assessment of proteoforms and is fully compatible with subsequent mass spectrometric analyses. Testing included various fractionation and non-fractionation approaches. The data show that resolving 500 µg protein on 17 cm 3–10 non-linear immobilised pH gradient strips in the first dimension followed by second dimension resolution on 7–20% gradient gels with a combination of lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) detergents markedly improves the resolution and detection of proteoforms in serum. In addition, well established third dimension electrophoretic separations in combination with deep imaging further contributed to the best available resolution, detection, and thus quantitative top-down analysis of serum proteomes. Full article
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Open AccessReview
A Comprehensive Guide for Performing Sample Preparation and Top-Down Protein Analysis
Proteomes 2017, 5(2), 11; doi:10.3390/proteomes5020011 -
Abstract
Methodologies for the global analysis of proteins in a sample, or proteome analysis, have been available since 1975 when Patrick O′Farrell published the first paper describing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). This technique allowed the resolution of single protein isoforms, or proteoforms, into single
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Methodologies for the global analysis of proteins in a sample, or proteome analysis, have been available since 1975 when Patrick O′Farrell published the first paper describing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). This technique allowed the resolution of single protein isoforms, or proteoforms, into single ‘spots’ in a polyacrylamide gel, allowing the quantitation of changes in a proteoform′s abundance to ascertain changes in an organism′s phenotype when conditions change. In pursuit of the comprehensive profiling of the proteome, significant advances in technology have made the identification and quantitation of intact proteoforms from complex mixtures of proteins more routine, allowing analysis of the proteome from the ‘Top-Down’. However, the number of proteoforms detected by Top-Down methodologies such as 2D-PAGE or mass spectrometry has not significantly increased since O’Farrell’s paper when compared to Bottom-Up, peptide-centric techniques. This article explores and explains the numerous methodologies and technologies available to analyse the proteome from the Top-Down with a strong emphasis on the necessity to analyse intact proteoforms as a better indicator of changes in biology and phenotype. We arrive at the conclusion that the complete and comprehensive profiling of an organism′s proteome is still, at present, beyond our reach but the continuing evolution of protein fractionation techniques and mass spectrometry brings comprehensive Top-Down proteome profiling closer. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Clinical Proteomics: From Biological Sample to Clinical Exploitation
Proteomes 2017, 5(2), 10; doi:10.3390/proteomes5020010 -
Open AccessArticle
Proteomic Profiling of the Microsomal Root Fraction: Discrimination of Pisum sativum L. Cultivars and Identification of Putative Root Growth Markers
Proteomes 2017, 5(1), 8; doi:10.3390/proteomes5010008 -
Abstract
Legumes are a large and economically important family, containing a variety of crop plants. Alongside different cereals, some fruits, and tropical roots, a number of leguminosae evolved for millennia as crops with human society. One of these legumes is Pisum sativum L., the
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Legumes are a large and economically important family, containing a variety of crop plants. Alongside different cereals, some fruits, and tropical roots, a number of leguminosae evolved for millennia as crops with human society. One of these legumes is Pisum sativum L., the common garden pea. In the past, breeding has been largely selective on improved above-ground organs. However, parameters, such as root-growth, which determines acquisition of nutrients and water, have largely been underestimated. Although the genome of P. sativum is still not fully sequenced, multiple proteomic studies have been published on a variety of physiological aspects in the last years. The presented work focused on the connection between root length and the influence of the microsomal root proteome of four different pea cultivars after five days of germination (cultivar Vroege, Girl from the Rhineland, Kelvedon Wonder, and Blauwschokker). In total, 60 proteins were identified to have significantly differential abundances in the four cultivars. Root growth of five-days old seedlings and their microsomal proteome revealed a similar separation pattern, suggesting that cultivar-specific root growth performance is explained by differential membrane and ribosomal protein levels. Hence, we reveal and discuss several putative root growth protein markers possibly playing a key role for improved primary root growth breeding strategies. Full article
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Open AccessReview
A Proteomic Perspective on the Bacterial Adaptation to Cold: Integrating OMICs Data of the Psychrotrophic Bacterium Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7
Proteomes 2017, 5(1), 9; doi:10.3390/proteomes5010009 -
Abstract
Since the publication of one of the first studies using 2D gel electrophoresis by Patrick H. O’Farrell in 1975, several other studies have used that method to evaluate cellular responses to different physicochemical variations. In environmental microbiology, bacterial adaptation to cold environments is
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Since the publication of one of the first studies using 2D gel electrophoresis by Patrick H. O’Farrell in 1975, several other studies have used that method to evaluate cellular responses to different physicochemical variations. In environmental microbiology, bacterial adaptation to cold environments is a “hot topic” because of its application in biotechnological processes. As in other fields, gel-based and gel-free proteomic methods have been used to determine the molecular mechanisms of adaptation to cold of several psychrotrophic and psychrophilic bacterial species. In this review, we aim to describe and discuss these main molecular mechanisms of cold adaptation, referencing proteomic studies that have made significant contributions to our current knowledge in the area. Furthermore, we use Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7 as a model organism to present the importance of integrating genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data. This species has been isolated in Antarctica and previously studied at all three omic levels. The integration of these data permitted more robust conclusions about the mechanisms of bacterial adaptation to cold. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Al3+ and La3+ Trivalent Metal Ions on Tomato Fruit Proteomes
Proteomes 2017, 5(1), 7; doi:10.3390/proteomes5010007 -
Abstract
The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ripening process from mature green (MG) to turning and then to red stages is accompanied by the occurrences of physiological and biochemical reactions, which ultimately result in the formation of the flavor, color and texture of ripe
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The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ripening process from mature green (MG) to turning and then to red stages is accompanied by the occurrences of physiological and biochemical reactions, which ultimately result in the formation of the flavor, color and texture of ripe fruits. The two trivalent metal ions Al3+ and La3+ are known to induce different levels of phytotoxicity in suppressing root growth. This paper aims to understand the impacts of these two metal ions on tomato fruit proteomes. Tomato ‘Micro-Tom’ plants were grown in a hydroponic culture system supplemented with 50 μM aluminum sulfate (Al2 (SO4)3.18H2O) for Al3+ or La2(SO4)3 for La3+. Quantitative proteomics analysis, using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation, were performed for fruits at MG, turning and red stages. Results show that in MG tomatoes, proteins involved in protein biosynthesis, photosynthesis and primary carbohydrate metabolisms were at a significantly lower level in Al-treated compared to La-treated plants. For the turning and red tomatoes, only a few proteins of significant differences between the two metal treatments were identified. Results from this study indicate that compared to La3+, Al3+ had a greater influence on the basic biological activities in green tomatoes, but such an impact became indistinguishable as tomatoes matured into the late ripening stages. Full article
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