Open AccessArticle
Marine Collagen Peptides from the Skin of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus): Characterization and Wound Healing Evaluation
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 102; doi:10.3390/md15040102 -
Abstract
Burns can cause tremendous economic problems associated with irreparable harm to patients and their families. To characterize marine collagen peptides (MCPs) from the skin of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), molecular weight distribution and amino acid composition of MCPs were determined, and
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Burns can cause tremendous economic problems associated with irreparable harm to patients and their families. To characterize marine collagen peptides (MCPs) from the skin of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), molecular weight distribution and amino acid composition of MCPs were determined, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to analyze the chemical structure. Meanwhile, to evaluate the wound healing activity, in vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out. The results showed that MCPs prepared from the skin of Nile tilapia by composite enzymatic hydrolysis were composed of polypeptides with different molecular weights and the contents of polypeptides with molecular weights of less than 5 kDa accounted for 99.14%. From the amino acid composition, the majority of residues, accounting for over 58% of the total residues in MCPs, were hydrophilic. FTIR indicated that the main molecular conformations inside MCPs were random coil. In vitro scratch assay showed that there were significant effects on the scratch closure by the treatment of MCPs with the concentration of 50.0 μg/mL. In the experiments of deep partial-thickness scald wound in rabbits, MCPs could enhance the process of wound healing. Therefore, MCPs from the skin of Nile tilapia (O. niloticus) have promising applications in wound care. Full article
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Open AccessReview
From Marine Venoms to Drugs: Efficiently Supported by a Combination of Transcriptomics and Proteomics
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 103; doi:10.3390/md15040103 -
Abstract
The potential of marine natural products to become new drugs is vast; however, research is still in its infancy. The chemical and biological diversity of marine toxins is immeasurable and as such an extraordinary resource for the discovery of new drugs. With the
[...] Read more.
The potential of marine natural products to become new drugs is vast; however, research is still in its infancy. The chemical and biological diversity of marine toxins is immeasurable and as such an extraordinary resource for the discovery of new drugs. With the rapid development of next-generation sequencing (NGS) and liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), it has been much easier and faster to identify more toxins and predict their functions with bioinformatics pipelines, which pave the way for novel drug developments. Here we provide an overview of related bioinformatics pipelines that have been supported by a combination of transcriptomics and proteomics for identification and function prediction of novel marine toxins. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the Distribution and Chemical Coding of Caudal Mesenteric Ganglion (CaMG) Neurons Supplying the Porcine Urinary Bladder
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 101; doi:10.3390/md15040101 -
Abstract
The treatment of micturition disorders creates a serious problem for urologists. Recently, new therapeutic agents, such as neurotoxins, are being considered for the therapy of urological patients. The present study investigated the chemical coding of caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG) neurons supplying the porcine
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The treatment of micturition disorders creates a serious problem for urologists. Recently, new therapeutic agents, such as neurotoxins, are being considered for the therapy of urological patients. The present study investigated the chemical coding of caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG) neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder after intravesical instillation of tetrodotoxin (TTX). The CaMG neurons were visualized with retrograde tracer Fast blue (FB) and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labeling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), somatostatin (SOM), calbindin (CB), galanin (GAL) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). It was found that in both the control (n = 6) and TTX-treated pigs (n = 6), the vast majority (92.6% ± 3.4% and 88.8% ± 2%, respectively) of FB-positive (FB+) nerve cells were TH+. TTX instillation caused a decrease in the number of FB+/TH+ neurons immunopositive to NPY (88.9% ± 5.3% in the control animals vs. 10.6% ± 5.3% in TTX-treated pigs) or VIP (1.7% ± 0.6% vs. 0%), and an increase in the number of FB+/TH+ neurons immunoreactive to SOM (8.8% ± 1.6% vs. 39% ± 12.8%), CB (1.8% ± 0.7% vs. 12.6% ± 2.7%), GAL (1.7% ± 0.8% vs. 10.9% ± 2.6%) or nNOS (0% vs. 1.1% ± 0.3%). The present study is the first to suggest that TTX modifies the chemical coding of CaMG neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Characterization and Potential Antitumor Activity of Polysaccharide from Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 100; doi:10.3390/md15040100 -
Abstract
Substances with valuable antitumor properties have been identified in many marine algae, including an edible polysaccharide from the marine alga Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (PGL). We previously reported transcriptome profiling data showing that PGL induced transcriptional alterations generate anti-lung cancer activity. To identify how PGL
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Substances with valuable antitumor properties have been identified in many marine algae, including an edible polysaccharide from the marine alga Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (PGL). We previously reported transcriptome profiling data showing that PGL induced transcriptional alterations generate anti-lung cancer activity. To identify how PGL is detrimental to tumors, we purified PGL to characterize its chemical composition, molecular weight, and sugar and protein content and investigated its antitumor activity. We demonstrated that PGL exerted its antitumor activities by modulating cell viability, morphology, apoptosis, and the apoptosis-related Fas/FasL signaling pathway in the human lung cancer cell line A549, the gastric cancer cell line MKN28, and the mouse melanoma cell line B16. Our data provide the first evidence that PGL inhibits cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, which is largely mediated by Fas/FasL in cancer cells, suggesting that PGL might be a novel therapeutic agent against cancer. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Another Look at Pyrroloiminoquinone Alkaloids—Perspectives on Their Therapeutic Potential from Known Structures and Semisynthetic Analogues
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 98; doi:10.3390/md15040098 -
Abstract
This study began with the goal of identifying constituents from Zyzzya fuliginosa extracts that showed selectivity in our primary cytotoxicity screen against the PANC-1 tumor cell line. During the course of this project, which focused on six Z. fuliginosa samples collected from
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This study began with the goal of identifying constituents from Zyzzya fuliginosa extracts that showed selectivity in our primary cytotoxicity screen against the PANC-1 tumor cell line. During the course of this project, which focused on six Z. fuliginosa samples collected from various regions of the Indo-Pacific, known compounds were obtained consisting of nine makaluvamine and three damirone analogues. Four new acetylated derivatives were also prepared. High-accuracy electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HAESI-MS) m/z ions produced through MS2 runs were obtained and interpreted to provide a rapid way for dereplicating isomers containing a pyrrolo[4,3,2-de]quinoline core. In vitro human pancreas/duct epithelioid carcinoma (PANC-1) cell line IC50 data was obtained for 16 compounds and two therapeutic standards. These results along with data gleaned from the literature provided useful structure activity relationship conclusions. Three structural motifs proved to be important in maximizing potency against PANC-1: (i) conjugation within the core of the ABC-ring; (ii) the presence of a positive charge in the C-ring; and (iii) inclusion of a 4-ethyl phenol or 4-ethyl phenol acetate substituent off the B-ring. Two compounds, makaluvamine J (9) and 15-O-acetyl makaluvamine J (15), contained all three of these frameworks and exhibited the best potency with IC50 values of 54 nM and 81 nM, respectively. These two most potent analogs were then tested against the OVCAR-5 cell line and the presence of the acetyl group increased the potency 14-fold from that of 9 whose IC50 = 120 nM vs. that of 15 having IC50 = 8.6 nM. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Current Status of Marine-Derived Compounds as Warheads in Anti-Tumor Drug Candidates
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 99; doi:10.3390/md15040099 -
Abstract
In this review, we have attempted to describe all of the antibody–drug conjugates using a marine-derived compound as the “warhead”, that are currently in clinical trials as listed in the current version of the NIH clinical trials database (clinicaltrials.gov). In searching this database,
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In this review, we have attempted to describe all of the antibody–drug conjugates using a marine-derived compound as the “warhead”, that are currently in clinical trials as listed in the current version of the NIH clinical trials database (clinicaltrials.gov). In searching this database, we used the beta-test version currently available, as it permitted more specific search parameters, since the regular version did not always find trials that had been completed in the past with some agents. We also added small discussion sections on candidates that are still at the preclinical stage, including a derivative of diazonamide that has an unusual interaction with tubulin (DZ-23840), which may also be a potential warhead in the future. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Variation Quality and Kinetic Parameter of Commercial n-3 PUFA-Rich Oil during Oxidation via Rancimat
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 97; doi:10.3390/md15040097 -
Abstract
Different biological sources of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in mainstream commercial products include algae and fish. Lipid oxidation in n-3 PUFA-rich oil is the most important cause of its deterioration. We investigated the kinetic parameters of n
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Different biological sources of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in mainstream commercial products include algae and fish. Lipid oxidation in n-3 PUFA-rich oil is the most important cause of its deterioration. We investigated the kinetic parameters of n-3 PUFA-rich oil during oxidation via Rancimat (at a temperature range of 70~100 °C). This was done on the basis of the Arrhenius equation, which indicates that the activation energies (Ea) for oxidative stability are 82.84–96.98 KJ/mol. The chemical substrates of different oxidative levels resulting from oxidation via Rancimat at 80 °C were evaluated. At the initiation of oxidation, the tocopherols in the oil degraded very quickly, resulting in diminished protection against further oxidation. Then, the degradation of the fatty acids with n-3 PUFA-rich oil was evident because of decreased levels of PUFA along with increased levels of saturated fatty acids (SFA). The quality deterioration from n-3 PUFA-rich oil at the various oxidative levels was analyzed chemometrically. The anisidine value (p-AV, r: 0.92) and total oxidation value (TOTOX, r: 0.91) exhibited a good linear relationship in a principal component analysis (PCA), while oxidative change and a significant quality change to the induction period (IP) were detected through an agglomerative hierarchical cluster (AHC) analysis. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Multifaceted Applications of Chitosan in Cancer Drug Delivery and Therapy
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 96; doi:10.3390/md15040096 -
Abstract
Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has
[...] Read more.
Chitosan is a versatile polysaccharide of biological origin. Due to the biocompatible and biodegradable nature of chitosan, it is intensively utilized in biomedical applications in scaffold engineering as an absorption enhancer, and for bioactive and controlled drug release. In cancer therapy, chitosan has multifaceted applications, such as assisting in gene delivery and chemotherapeutic delivery, and as an immunoadjuvant for vaccines. The present review highlights the recent applications of chitosan and chitosan derivatives in cancer therapy. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Outdoor Cultivation of Marine Diatoms for Year-Round Production of Biofuels
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 94; doi:10.3390/md15040094 -
Abstract
Biofuel production using microalgae is believed to have the advantage of continuous year-round production over crop plants, which have strong seasonality. However, actual year-round production of microalgal lipids using outdoor mass cultivation has rarely been demonstrated. In our previous study, it was demonstrated
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Biofuel production using microalgae is believed to have the advantage of continuous year-round production over crop plants, which have strong seasonality. However, actual year-round production of microalgal lipids using outdoor mass cultivation has rarely been demonstrated. In our previous study, it was demonstrated that the oleaginous diatom, Fistulifera solaris, was culturable in outdoor bioreactors from spring to autumn, whereas biomass and lipid production in winter failed because F. solaris did not grow below 15 °C. Therefore, another candidate strain that is culturable in winter is required. In this study, a cold-tolerant diatom, Mayamaea sp. JPCC CTDA0820, was selected as a promising candidate for biofuel production in winter. Laboratory-scale characterization revealed that this diatom was culturable at temperatures as low as 10 °C. Subsequently, F. solaris (April–October) and Mayamaea sp. JPCC CTDA0820 (November–March) were cultured in outdoor open-pond bioreactors, wherein year-round production of diatom lipids was successfully demonstrated. The maximal values of areal productivities of biomass and lipids reached to 9.79 and 1.80 g/(m2 day) for F. solaris, and 8.62 and 0.92 g/(m2 day) for Mayamaea sp. JPCC CTDA0820, respectively. With the combined use of these two diatom species, stable year-round production of microalgal lipids became possible. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Enzymatic Processes in Marine Biotechnology
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 93; doi:10.3390/md15040093 -
Abstract
In previous review articles the attention of the biocatalytically oriented scientific community towards the marine environment as a source of biocatalysts focused on the habitat-related properties of marine enzymes. Updates have already appeared in the literature, including marine examples of oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases,
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In previous review articles the attention of the biocatalytically oriented scientific community towards the marine environment as a source of biocatalysts focused on the habitat-related properties of marine enzymes. Updates have already appeared in the literature, including marine examples of oxidoreductases, hydrolases, transferases, isomerases, ligases, and lyases ready for food and pharmaceutical applications. Here a new approach for searching the literature and presenting a more refined analysis is adopted with respect to previous surveys, centering the attention on the enzymatic process rather than on a single novel activity. Fields of applications are easily individuated: (i) the biorefinery value-chain, where the provision of biomass is one of the most important aspects, with aquaculture as the prominent sector; (ii) the food industry, where the interest in the marine domain is similarly developed to deal with the enzymatic procedures adopted in food manipulation; (iii) the selective and easy extraction/modification of structurally complex marine molecules, where enzymatic treatments are a recognized tool to improve efficiency and selectivity; and (iv) marine biomarkers and derived applications (bioremediation) in pollution monitoring are also included in that these studies could be of high significance for the appreciation of marine bioprocesses. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Place to Call Home: An Analysis of the Bacterial Communities in Two Tethya rubra Samaai and Gibbons 2005 Populations in Algoa Bay, South Africa
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 95; doi:10.3390/md15040095 -
Abstract
Sponges are important sources of bioactive secondary metabolites. These compounds are frequently synthesized by bacterial symbionts, which may be recruited from the surrounding seawater or transferred to the sponge progeny by the parent. In this study, we investigated the bacterial communities associated with
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Sponges are important sources of bioactive secondary metabolites. These compounds are frequently synthesized by bacterial symbionts, which may be recruited from the surrounding seawater or transferred to the sponge progeny by the parent. In this study, we investigated the bacterial communities associated with the sponge Tethya rubra Samaai and Gibbons 2005. Sponge specimens were collected from Evans Peak and RIY Banks reefs in Algoa Bay, South Africa and taxonomically identified by spicule analysis and molecular barcoding. Crude chemical extracts generated from individual sponges were profiled by ultraviolet high performance liquid chromatography (UV-HPLC) and subjected to bioactivity assays in mammalian cells. Next-generation sequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences was used to characterize sponge-associated bacterial communities. T. rubra sponges collected from the two locations were morphologically and genetically indistinguishable. Chemical extracts from sponges collected at RIY banks showed mild inhibition of the metabolic activity of mammalian cells and their UV-HPLC profiles were distinct from those of sponges collected at Evans Peak. Similarly, the bacterial communities associated with sponges from the two locations were distinct with evidence of vertical transmission of symbionts from the sponge parent to its embryos. We conclude that these distinct bacterial communities may be responsible for the differences observed in the chemical profiles of the two Algoa Bay T. rubra Samaai and Gibbons 2005 populations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Degradation of Marine Algae-Derived Carbohydrates by Bacteroidetes Isolated from Human Gut Microbiota
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 92; doi:10.3390/md15040092 -
Abstract
Carrageenan, agarose, and alginate are algae-derived undigested polysaccharides that have been used as food additives for hundreds of years. Fermentation of dietary carbohydrates of our food in the lower gut of humans is a critical process for the function and integrity of both
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Carrageenan, agarose, and alginate are algae-derived undigested polysaccharides that have been used as food additives for hundreds of years. Fermentation of dietary carbohydrates of our food in the lower gut of humans is a critical process for the function and integrity of both the bacterial community and host cells. However, little is known about the fermentation of these three kinds of seaweed carbohydrates by human gut microbiota. Here, the degradation characteristics of carrageenan, agarose, alginate, and their oligosaccharides, by Bacteroides xylanisolvens, Bacteroides ovatus, and Bacteroides uniforms,isolated from human gut microbiota, are studied. Full article
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Open AccessReview
An Overview of the Protective Effects of Chitosan and Acetylated Chitosan Oligosaccharides against Neuronal Disorders
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 89; doi:10.3390/md15040089 -
Abstract
Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is mainly comprised of a marine invertebrate, consisting of repeating β-1,4 linked N-acetylated glucosamine units, whereas its N-deacetylated product, chitosan, has broad medical applications. Interestingly, chitosan oligosaccharides have therapeutic effects on different types
[...] Read more.
Chitin is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth and is mainly comprised of a marine invertebrate, consisting of repeating β-1,4 linked N-acetylated glucosamine units, whereas its N-deacetylated product, chitosan, has broad medical applications. Interestingly, chitosan oligosaccharides have therapeutic effects on different types of neuronal disorders, including, but not limited to, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and nerve crush injury. A common link among neuronal disorders is observed at a sub-cellular level, such as atypical protein assemblies and induced neuronal death. Chronic activation of innate immune responses that lead to neuronal injury is also common in these diseases. Thus, the common mechanisms of neuronal disorders might explain the general therapeutic effects of chitosan oligosaccharides and their derivatives in these diseases. This review provides an update on the pathogenesis and therapy for neuronal disorders and will be mainly focused on the recent progress made towards the neuroprotective properties of chitosan and acetylated chitosan oligosaccharides. Their structural features and the underlying molecular mechanisms will also be discussed. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication
Marine Cyclic Guanidine Alkaloids Monanchomycalin B and Urupocidin A Act as Inhibitors of TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPV3, but not TRPA1 Receptors
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 87; doi:10.3390/md15040087 -
Abstract
Marine sponges contain a variety of low-molecular-weight compounds including guanidine alkaloids possessing different biological activities. Monanchomycalin B and urupocidin A were isolated from the marine sponge Monanchora pulchra. We found that they act as inhibitors of the TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3 channels, but
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Marine sponges contain a variety of low-molecular-weight compounds including guanidine alkaloids possessing different biological activities. Monanchomycalin B and urupocidin A were isolated from the marine sponge Monanchora pulchra. We found that they act as inhibitors of the TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3 channels, but are inactive against the TRPA1 receptor. Monanchomycalin B is the most active among all published marine alkaloids (EC50 6.02, 2.84, and 3.25 μM for TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3, correspondingly). Moreover, monanchomycalin B and urupocidin A are the first samples of marine alkaloids affecting the TRPV2 receptor. Two semi-synthetic urupocidin A derivatives were also obtained and tested against TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) receptors that allowed us to collect some data concerning the structure-activity relationship in this series of compounds. We showed that the removal of one of three side chains or double bonds in the other side chains in urupocidin A led to a decrease of the inhibitory activities. New ligands specific to the TRPV subfamily may be useful for the design of medicines as in the study of TRP channels biology. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Establishing the Secondary Metabolite Profile of the Marine Fungus: Tolypocladium geodes sp. MF458 and Subsequent Optimisation of Bioactive Secondary Metabolite Production
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 84; doi:10.3390/md15040084 -
Abstract
As part of an international research project, the marine fungal strain collection of the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research (GEOMAR) research centre was analysed for secondary metabolite profiles associated with anticancer activity. Strain MF458 was identified as Tolypocladium geodes, by internal transcribed
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As part of an international research project, the marine fungal strain collection of the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research (GEOMAR) research centre was analysed for secondary metabolite profiles associated with anticancer activity. Strain MF458 was identified as Tolypocladium geodes, by internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequence similarity and its natural product production profile. By using five different media in two conditions and two time points, we were able to identify eight natural products produced by MF458. As well as cyclosporin A (1), efrapeptin D (2), pyridoxatin (3), terricolin A (4), malettinins B and E (5 and 6), and tolypocladenols A1/A2 (8), we identified a new secondary metabolite which we termed tolypocladenol C (7). All compounds were analysed for their anticancer potential using a selection of the NCI60 cancer cell line panel, with malettinins B and E (5 and 6) being the most promising candidates. In order to obtain sufficient quantities of these compounds to start preclinical development, their production was transferred from a static flask culture to a stirred tank reactor, and fermentation medium development resulted in a nearly eight-fold increase in compound production. The strain MF458 is therefore a producer of a number of interesting and new secondary metabolites and their production levels can be readily improved to achieve higher yields. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Biscembranoids and Cembranoids from the Soft Coral Sarcophyton elegans
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 85; doi:10.3390/md15040085 -
Abstract
Two novel biscembranoids, sarelengans A and B (1 and 2), five new cembranoids, sarelengans C–G (37), along with two known cembranoids (8 and 9) were isolated from the South China Sea soft coral Sarcophyton elegans
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Two novel biscembranoids, sarelengans A and B (1 and 2), five new cembranoids, sarelengans C–G (37), along with two known cembranoids (8 and 9) were isolated from the South China Sea soft coral Sarcophyton elegans. Their structures were determined by spectroscopic and chemical methods, and those of 1, 4, 5, and 6 were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compounds 1 and 2 represent the first example of biscembranoids featuring a trans-fused A/B-ring conjunction between the two cembranoid units. Their unique structures may shed light on an unusual biosynthetic pathway involving a cembranoid-∆8 rather than the normal cembranoid-∆1 unit in the endo-Diels-Alder cycloaddition. Compounds 2 and 3 exhibited potential inhibitory effects on nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophages, with IC50 values being at 18.2 and 32.5 μM, respectively. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Marine Peptides as Potential Agents for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus—A Prospect
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 88; doi:10.3390/md15040088 -
Abstract
An increasing prevalence of diabetes is known as a main risk for human health in the last future worldwide. There is limited evidence on the potential management of type 2 diabetes mellitus using bioactive peptides from marine organisms, besides from milk and beans.
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An increasing prevalence of diabetes is known as a main risk for human health in the last future worldwide. There is limited evidence on the potential management of type 2 diabetes mellitus using bioactive peptides from marine organisms, besides from milk and beans. We summarized here recent advances in our understanding of the regulation of glucose metabolism using bioactive peptides from natural proteins, including regulation of insulin-regulated glucose metabolism, such as protection and reparation of pancreatic β-cells, enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and influencing the sensitivity of insulin and the signaling pathways, and inhibition of bioactive peptides to dipeptidyl peptidase IV, α-amylase and α-glucosidase activities. The present paper tried to understand the underlying mechanism involved and the structure characteristics of bioactive peptides responsible for its antidiabetic activities to prospect the utilization of rich marine organism proteins. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Anti-Obesity and Anti-Diabetic Effect of Neoagarooligosaccharides on High-Fat Diet-Induced Obesity in Mice
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(4), 90; doi:10.3390/md15040090 -
Abstract
Neoagarooligosaccharides (NAOs), mainly comprising neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, were prepared by hydrolyzing agar with β-agarase DagA from Streptomyces coelicolor, and the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of NAOs on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice were investigated after NAOs-supplementation for 64 days. Compared to the
[...] Read more.
Neoagarooligosaccharides (NAOs), mainly comprising neoagarotetraose and neoagarohexaose, were prepared by hydrolyzing agar with β-agarase DagA from Streptomyces coelicolor, and the anti-obesity and anti-diabetic effects of NAOs on high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity in mice were investigated after NAOs-supplementation for 64 days. Compared to the HFD group, the HFD-0.5 group that was fed with HFD + NAOs (0.5%, w/w) showed remarkable reduction of 36% for body weight gain and 37% for food efficiency ratios without abnormal clinical signs. Furthermore, fat accumulation in the liver and development of macrovesicular steatosis induced by HFD in the HFD-0.5 group were recovered nearly to the levels found in the normal diet (ND) group. NAOs intake could also effectively reduce the size (area) of adipocytes and tissue weight gain in the perirenal and epididymal adipose tissues. The increased concentrations of total cholesterol, triglyceride, and free fatty acid in serum of the HFD group were also markedly ameliorated to the levels found in serum of the ND group after NAOs-intake in a dose dependent manner. In addition, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance induced by HFD were distinctly improved, and adiponectin concentration in the blood was notably increased. All these results strongly suggest that intake of NAOs can effectively suppress obesity and obesity-related metabolic syndromes, such as hyperlipidemia, steatosis, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance, by inducing production of adiponectin in the HFD-induced obese mice. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Extract from Shrimp Processing By-Products Protects SH-SY5Y Cells from Neurotoxicity Induced by Aβ25–35
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(3), 83; doi:10.3390/md15030083 -
Abstract
Increased evidence suggests that marine unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) can protect neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) assays showed that the acetone extract 4-2A obtained from shrimp Pandalus borealis industry processing
[...] Read more.
Increased evidence suggests that marine unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) can protect neurons from amyloid-β (Aβ)-induced neurodegeneration. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) assays showed that the acetone extract 4-2A obtained from shrimp Pandalus borealis industry processing wastes contained 67.19% monounsaturated FAs and 16.84% polyunsaturated FAs. The present study evaluated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects of 4-2A in Aβ25–35-insulted differentiated SH-SY5Y cells. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were measured by using 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used to study the expression of neurotrophins, pro-inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis-related genes. Administration of 20 μM Aβ25–35 significantly reduced SH-SY5Y cell viability, the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) and its tyrosine kinase TrkA receptor, as well as the level of glutathione, while increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its TrkB receptor. Aβ25–35 also increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase-3 expression. Treatment with 4-2A significantly attenuated the Aβ25–35-induced changes in cell viability, ROS, GSH, NGF, TrkA, TNF-α, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and Caspase-3, except for nitric oxide, BDNF and TrKB. In conclusion, 4-2A effectively protected SH-SY5Y cells against Aβ-induced neuronal apoptosis/death by suppressing inflammation and oxidative stress and up-regulating NGF and TrKA expression. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Mass Spectrometric Characteristics of Prenylated Indole Derivatives from Marine-Derived Penicillium sp. NH-SL
Mar. Drugs 2017, 15(3), 86; doi:10.3390/md15030086 -
Abstract
Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem
[...] Read more.
Two prenylated indole alkaloids were isolated from the ethyl acetate extracts of a marine-derived fungus Penicillium sp. NH-SL and one of them exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against mouse hepa 1c1c7 cells. In order to detect other bioactive analogs, we used liquid chromatogram tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to analyze the mass spectrometric characteristics of the isolated compounds as well as the crude extracts. As a result, three other analogs were detected, and their structures were deduced according to the similar fragmentation patterns. This is the first systematic report on the mass spectrometric characteristics of prenylated indole derivatives. Full article
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