Open AccessArticle
Effects of 3D-Printed Polycaprolactone/β-Tricalcium Phosphate Membranes on Guided Bone Regeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 899; doi:10.3390/ijms18050899 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP) membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR). Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and
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This study was conducted to compare 3D-printed polycaprolactone (PCL) and polycaprolactone/β-tricalcium phosphate (PCL/β-TCP) membranes with a conventional commercial collagen membrane in terms of their abilities to facilitate guided bone regeneration (GBR). Fabricated membranes were tested for dry and wet mechanical properties. Fibroblasts and preosteoblasts were seeded into the membranes and rates and patterns of proliferation were analyzed using a kit-8 assay and by scanning electron microscopy. Osteogenic differentiation was verified by alizarin red S and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) staining. An in vivo experiment was performed using an alveolar bone defect beagle model, in which defects in three dogs were covered with different membranes. CT and histological analyses at eight weeks after surgery revealed that 3D-printed PCL/β-TCP membranes were more effective than 3D-printed PCL, and substantially better than conventional collagen membranes in terms of biocompatibility and bone regeneration and, thus, at facilitating GBR. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Selection, Characterization and Interaction Studies of a DNA Aptamer for the Detection of Bifidobacterium bifidum
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 883; doi:10.3390/ijms18050883 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
A whole-bacterium-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) procedure was adopted in this study for the selection of an ssDNA aptamer that binds to Bifidobacterium bifidum. After 12 rounds of selection targeted against B. bifidum, 30 sequences were obtained
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A whole-bacterium-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) procedure was adopted in this study for the selection of an ssDNA aptamer that binds to Bifidobacterium bifidum. After 12 rounds of selection targeted against B. bifidum, 30 sequences were obtained and divided into seven families according to primary sequence homology and similarity of secondary structure. Four FAM (fluorescein amidite) labeled aptamer sequences from different families were selected for further characterization by flow cytometric analysis. The results reveal that the aptamer sequence CCFM641-5 demonstrated high-affinity and specificity for B. bifidum compared with the other sequences tested, and the estimated Kd value was 10.69 ± 0.89 nM. Additionally, sequence truncation experiments of the aptamer CCFM641-5 led to the conclusion that the 5′-primer and 3′-primer binding sites were essential for aptamer-target binding. In addition, the possible component of the target B. bifidum, bound by the aptamer CCFM641-5, was identified as a membrane protein by treatment with proteinase. Furthermore, to prove the potential application of the aptamer CCFM641-5, a colorimetric bioassay of the sandwich-type structure was used to detect B. bifidum. The assay had a linear range of 104 to 107 cfu/mL (R2 = 0.9834). Therefore, the colorimetric bioassay appears to be a promising method for the detection of B. bifidum based on the aptamer CCFM641-5. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Long-Term Treatment with Arachidonyl-2′-Chloroethylamide Combined with Valproate Increases Neurogenesis in a Mouse Pilocarpine Model of Epilepsy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 900; doi:10.3390/ijms18050900 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Rational polytherapy in the treatment of refractory epilepsy has been the main therapeutic modality for several years. In treatment with two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), it is of particular importance that AEDs be selected based on their high anticonvulsant properties, minimal side
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Rational polytherapy in the treatment of refractory epilepsy has been the main therapeutic modality for several years. In treatment with two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), it is of particular importance that AEDs be selected based on their high anticonvulsant properties, minimal side effects, and impact on the formation of new neurons. The aim of the study was to conduct an in vivo evaluation of the relationship between treatments with synthetic cannabinoid arachidonyl-2′-chloroethylamide (ACEA) alone or in combination with valproic acid (VPA) and hippocampal neurogenesis in a mouse pilocarpine model of epilepsy. All studies were performed on adolescent male CB57/BL mice with using the following drugs: VPA (10 mg/kg), ACEA (10 mg/kg), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF—a substance protecting ACEA against degradation by fatty acid hydrolase, 30 mg/kg), pilocarpine (PILO, a single dose of 290 mg/kg) and methylscopolamine (30 min before PILO to stop peripheral cholinergic effects of pilocarpine, 1 mg/kg). We evaluated the process of neurogenesis after a 10-day treatment with ACEA and VPA, alone and in combination. We observed a decrease of neurogenesis in the PILO control group as compared to the healthy control mice. Furthermore, ACEA + PMSF alone and in combination with VPA significantly increased neurogenesis compared to the PILO control group. In contrast, VPA 10-day treatment had no impact on the level of neurons in comparison to the PILO control group. The combination of ACEA, PMSF and VPA considerably stimulated the process of creating new cells, particularly neurons, while chronic administration of VPA itself had no influence on neurogenesis in the mouse pilocarpine model of epilepsy. The obtained results enabled an in vivo evaluation of neurogenesis after treatment with antiepileptic drugs in an experimental model of epilepsy. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Of Oestrogens and Sperm: A Review of the Roles of Oestrogens and Oestrogen Receptors in Male Reproduction
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 904; doi:10.3390/ijms18050904 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
The crucial role that oestrogens play in male reproduction has been generally accepted; however, the exact mechanism of their action is not entirely clear and there is still much more to be clarified. The oestrogen response is mediated through oestrogen receptors, as well
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The crucial role that oestrogens play in male reproduction has been generally accepted; however, the exact mechanism of their action is not entirely clear and there is still much more to be clarified. The oestrogen response is mediated through oestrogen receptors, as well as classical oestrogen receptors’ variants, and their specific co-expression plays a critical role. The importance of oestrogen signalling in male fertility is indicated by the adverse effects of selected oestrogen-like compounds, and their interaction with oestrogen receptors was proven to cause pathologies. The aims of this review are to summarise the current knowledge on oestrogen signalling during spermatogenesis and sperm maturation and discuss the available information on oestrogen receptors and their splice variants. An overview is given of species-specific differences including in humans, along with a detailed summary of the methodology outcome, including all the genetically manipulated models available to date. This review provides coherent information on the recently discovered mechanisms of oestrogens’ and oestrogen receptors’ effects and action in both testicular somatic and germ cells, as well as in mature sperm, available for mammals, including humans. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Collagenous Extracellular Matrix Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering: Lessons from the Common Sea Urchin Tissue
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 901; doi:10.3390/ijms18050901 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources
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Scaffolds for tissue engineering application may be made from a collagenous extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissues because the ECM can mimic the functions of the target tissue. The primary sources of collagenous ECM material are calf skin and bone. However, these sources are associated with the risk of having bovine spongiform encephalopathy or transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Alternative sources for collagenous ECM materials may be derived from livestock, e.g., pigs, and from marine animals, e.g., sea urchins. Collagenous ECM of the sea urchin possesses structural features and mechanical properties that are similar to those of mammalian ones. However, even more intriguing is that some tissues such as the ligamentous catch apparatus can exhibit mutability, namely rapid reversible changes in the tissue mechanical properties. These tissues are known as mutable collagenous tissues (MCTs). The mutability of these tissues has been the subject of on-going investigations, covering the biochemistry, structural biology and mechanical properties of the collagenous components. Recent studies point to a nerve-control system for regulating the ECM macromolecules that are involved in the sliding action of collagen fibrils in the MCT. This review discusses the key attributes of the structure and function of the ECM of the sea urchin ligaments that are related to the fibril-fibril sliding action—the focus is on the respective components within the hierarchical architecture of the tissue. In this context, structure refers to size, shape and separation distance of the ECM components while function is associated with mechanical properties e.g., strength and stiffness. For simplicity, the components that address the different length scale from the largest to the smallest are as follows: collagen fibres, collagen fibrils, interfibrillar matrix and collagen molecules. Application of recent theories of stress transfer and fracture mechanisms in fibre reinforced composites to a wide variety of collagen reinforcing (non-mutable) connective tissue, has allowed us to draw general conclusions concerning the mechanical response of the MCT at specific mechanical states, namely the stiff and complaint states. The intent of this review is to provide the latest insights, as well as identify technical challenges and opportunities, that may be useful for developing methods for effective mechanical support when adapting decellularised connective tissues from the sea urchin for tissue engineering or for the design of a synthetic analogue. Full article
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Open AccessCorrection
Correction: Chon-Kit Chou, et al. The Regulations of Deubiquitinase USP15 and Its Pathophysiological Mechanisms in Diseases. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18, 483
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 902; doi:10.3390/ijms18050902 (registering DOI) -
Open AccessReview
Matrix Metalloproteinase Gene Activation Resulting from Disordred Epigenetic Mechanisms in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 905; doi:10.3390/ijms18050905 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts (SFs) produce matrix-degrading enzymes, including MMPs, which facilitate cartilage destruction in the affected joints in RA. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to change in the chromatin state, resulting
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Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in the degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial fibroblasts (SFs) produce matrix-degrading enzymes, including MMPs, which facilitate cartilage destruction in the affected joints in RA. Epigenetic mechanisms contribute to change in the chromatin state, resulting in an alteration of gene transcription. Recently, MMP gene activation has been shown to be caused in RASFs by the dysregulation of epigenetic changes, such as histone modifications, DNA methylation, and microRNA (miRNA) signaling. In this paper, we review the role of MMPs in the pathogenesis of RA as well as the disordered epigenetic mechanisms regulating MMP gene activation in RASFs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
188Re-Liposome Can Induce Mitochondrial Autophagy and Reverse Drug Resistance for Ovarian Cancer: From Bench Evidence to Preliminary Clinical Proof-of-Concept
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 903; doi:10.3390/ijms18050903 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Despite standard treatment, about 70% of ovarian cancer will recur. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been implicated in the drug-resistance mechanism. Several drug resistance mechanisms have been proposed, and among these, autophagy plays a crucial role for the maintenance and tumorigenicity of CSCs.
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Despite standard treatment, about 70% of ovarian cancer will recur. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been implicated in the drug-resistance mechanism. Several drug resistance mechanisms have been proposed, and among these, autophagy plays a crucial role for the maintenance and tumorigenicity of CSCs. Compared to their differentiated counterparts, CSCs have been demonstrated to display a significantly higher level of autophagy flux. Moreover, mitophagy, a specific type of autophagy that selectively degrades excessive or damaged mitochondria, is shown to contribute to cancer progression and recurrence in several types of tumors. Nanomedicine has been shown to tackle the CSCs problem by overcoming drug resistance. In this work, we developed a nanomedicine, 188Re-liposome, which was demonstrated to target autophagy and mitophagy in the tumor microenvironment. Of note, the inhibition of autophagy and mitophagy could lead to significant tumor inhibition in two xenograft animal models. Lastly, we presented two cases of recurrent ovarian cancer, both in drug resistance status that received a level I dose from a phase I clinical trial. Both cases developing drug resistance showed drug sensitivity to 188Re-liposome. These results suggest that inhibition of autophagy and mitophagy by a nanomedicine may be a novel strategy to overcome drug resistance in ovarian cancer. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Real-World Experiences with the Combination Treatment of Ledipasvir plus Sofosbuvir for 12 Weeks in HCV Genotype 1-Infected Japanese Patients: Achievement of a Sustained Virological Response in Previous Users of Peginterferon plus Ribavirin with HCV NS3/4A Inhibitors
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(5), 906; doi:10.3390/ijms18050906 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterize the treatment response and serious adverse events of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir therapies in Japanese patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 (GT1). This retrospective study analyzed 240 Japanese HCV GT1 patients treated for
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The aim of this study was to characterize the treatment response and serious adverse events of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir therapies in Japanese patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 (GT1). This retrospective study analyzed 240 Japanese HCV GT1 patients treated for 12 weeks with 90 mg of ledipasvir plus 400 mg of sofosbuvir daily. Sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) was achieved in 236 of 240 (98.3%) patients. Among treatment-naïve patients, SVR12 was achieved in 136 of 138 (98.6%) patients, and among treatment-experienced patients, SVR12 was achieved in 100 of 102 (98.0%) patients. In patients previously treated with peginterferon plus ribavirin with various HCV NS3/4A inhibitors, 100% SVR rates (25/25) were achieved. Two relapsers had HCV NS5A resistance-associated variants (RAVs), but no HCV NS5B-S282 was observed after they relapsed. We experienced two patients with cardiac events during treatment. In conclusion, combination of ledipasvir plus sofosbuvir for 12 weeks is a potential therapy for HCV GT1 patients. Caution is needed for HCV NS5A RAVs, which were selected by HCV NS5A inhibitors and cardiac adverse events. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
CoQ10 Deficiency May Indicate Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cr(VI) Toxicity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 816; doi:10.3390/ijms18040816 -
Abstract
To investigate the toxic mechanism of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) and search for an antidote for Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, a study of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Cr(VI) and cell survival by recovering mitochondrial function was performed. In the present study, we found that the gene
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To investigate the toxic mechanism of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) and search for an antidote for Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, a study of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Cr(VI) and cell survival by recovering mitochondrial function was performed. In the present study, we found that the gene expression of electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH) was strongly downregulated by Cr(VI) exposure. The levels of coenzyme 10 (CoQ10) and mitochondrial biogenesis presented by mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA copy number were also significantly reduced after Cr(VI) exposure. The subsequent, Cr(VI)-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis were characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ATP production, increased methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) content, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) opening, increased Ca2+ levels, Cyt c release, decreased Bcl-2 expression, and significantly elevated Bax expression. The Cr(VI)-induced deleterious changes were attenuated by pretreatment with CoQ10 in L-02 hepatocytes. These data suggest that Cr(VI) induces CoQ10 deficiency in L-02 hepatocytes, indicating that this deficiency may be a biomarker of mitochondrial dysfunction in Cr(VI) poisoning and that exogenous administration of CoQ10 may restore mitochondrial function and protect the liver from Cr(VI) exposure. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Role of RHEB in Regulating Differentiation Fate of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Cartilage and Bone Regeneration
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 880; doi:10.3390/ijms18040880 -
Abstract
Advances in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell replacement therapies are promising approaches to treat cartilage and bone defects since substantial differentiation capacities of MSCs match the demands of tissue regeneration. Our understanding of the dynamic process requiring indispensable differentiation of MSCs remains
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Advances in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and cell replacement therapies are promising approaches to treat cartilage and bone defects since substantial differentiation capacities of MSCs match the demands of tissue regeneration. Our understanding of the dynamic process requiring indispensable differentiation of MSCs remains limited. Herein, we describe the role of RHEB (Ras homolog enriched in brain) regulating gene signature for differentiation of human adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) into chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic lineages. RHEB-overexpression increases the proliferation of the ASCs. RHEB enhances the chondrogenic differentiation of ASCs in 3D culture via upregulation of SOX9 with concomitant increase in glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and type II collagen (COL2). RHEB increases the osteogenesis via upregulation of runt related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) with an increase in the calcium and phosphate contents. RHEB also increases the expression of osteogenic markers, osteonectin and osteopontin. RHEB knockdown ASCs were incapable of expressing sufficient SRY (Sex determining region Y)-box 9 (SOX9) and RUNX2, and therefore had decreased chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation. RHEB-overexpression impaired ASCs differentiation into adipogenic lineage, through downregulation of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBPβ). Conversely, RHEB knockdown abolished the negative regulation of adipogenesis. We demonstrate that RHEB is a novel regulator, with a critical role in ASCs lineage determination, and RHEB-modulated ASCs may be useful as a cell therapy for cartilage and bone defect treatments. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Acteoside and Isoacteoside Protect Amyloid β Peptide Induced Cytotoxicity, Cognitive Deficit and Neurochemical Disturbances In Vitro and In Vivo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 895; doi:10.3390/ijms18040895 -
Abstract
Acteoside and isoacteoside, two phenylethanoid glycosides, coexist in some plants. This study investigates the memory-improving and cytoprotective effects of acteoside and isoacteoside in amyloid β peptide 1-42 (Aβ 1-42)-infused rats and Aβ 1-42-treated SH-SY5Y cells. It further elucidates the role of amyloid cascade
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Acteoside and isoacteoside, two phenylethanoid glycosides, coexist in some plants. This study investigates the memory-improving and cytoprotective effects of acteoside and isoacteoside in amyloid β peptide 1-42 (Aβ 1-42)-infused rats and Aβ 1-42-treated SH-SY5Y cells. It further elucidates the role of amyloid cascade and central neuronal function in these effects. Acteoside and isoacteoside ameliorated cognitive deficits, decreased amyloid deposition, and reversed central cholinergic dysfunction that were caused by Aβ 1-42 in rats. Acteoside and isoacteoside further decreased extracellular Aβ 1-40 production and restored the cell viability that was decreased by Aβ 1-42 in SH-SY5Y cells. Acteoside and isoacteoside also promoted Aβ 1-40 degradation and inhibited Aβ 1-42 oligomerization in vitro. However, the memory-improving and cytoprotective effects of isoacteoside exceeded those of acteoside. Isoacteoside promoted exploratory behavior and restored cortical and hippocampal dopamine levels, but acteoside did not. We suggest that acteoside and isoacteoside ameliorated the cognitive dysfunction that was caused by Aβ 1-42 by blocking amyloid deposition via preventing amyloid oligomerization, and reversing central neuronal function via counteracting amyloid cytotoxicity. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Synaptic Homeostasis and Its Immunological Disturbance in Neuromuscular Junction Disorders
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 896; doi:10.3390/ijms18040896 -
Abstract
In the neuromuscular junction, postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) clustering, trans-synaptic communication and synaptic stabilization are modulated by the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. The synaptic functions are based presynaptically on the active zone architecture, synaptic vesicle proteins, Ca2+ channels and synaptic
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In the neuromuscular junction, postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) clustering, trans-synaptic communication and synaptic stabilization are modulated by the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. The synaptic functions are based presynaptically on the active zone architecture, synaptic vesicle proteins, Ca2+ channels and synaptic vesicle recycling. Postsynaptically, they are based on rapsyn-anchored nAChR clusters, localized sensitivity to ACh, and synaptic stabilization via linkage to the extracellular matrix so as to be precisely opposed to the nerve terminal. Focusing on neural agrin, Wnts, muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (a mediator of agrin and Wnts signalings and regulator of trans-synaptic communication), low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (the receptor of agrin and Wnts and participant in retrograde signaling), laminin-network (including muscle-derived agrin), extracellular matrix proteins (participating in the synaptic stabilization) and presynaptic receptors (including muscarinic and adenosine receptors), we review the functional structures of the synapse by making reference to immunological pathogenecities in postsynaptic disease, myasthenia gravis. The synapse-related proteins including cortactin, coronin-6, caveolin-3, doublecortin, R-spondin 2, amyloid precursor family proteins, glia cell-derived neurotrophic factor and neurexins are also discussed in terms of their possible contribution to efficient synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
E2/ER β Enhances Calcineurin Protein Degradation and PI3K/Akt/MDM2 Signal Transduction to Inhibit ISO-Induced Myocardial Cell Apoptosis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 892; doi:10.3390/ijms18040892 -
Abstract
Secretion of multifunctional estrogen and its receptor has been widely considered as the reason for markedly higher frequency of heart disease in men than in women. 17β-Estradiol (E2), for instance, has been reported to prevent development of cardiac apoptosis via activation of estrogen
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Secretion of multifunctional estrogen and its receptor has been widely considered as the reason for markedly higher frequency of heart disease in men than in women. 17β-Estradiol (E2), for instance, has been reported to prevent development of cardiac apoptosis via activation of estrogen receptors (ERs). In addition, protein phosphatase such as protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and calcineurin (PP2B) are also involved in cardiac hypertrophy and cell apoptosis signaling. However, the mechanism by which E2/ERβ suppresses apoptosis is not fully understood, and the role of protein phosphatase in E2/ERβ action also needs further investigation. In this study, we observed that E2/ERβ inhibited isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial cell apoptosis, cytochrome c release and downstream apoptotic markers. Moreover, we found that E2/ERβ blocks ISO-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells through the enhancement of calcineurin protein degradation through PI3K/Akt/MDM2 signaling pathway. Our results suggest that supplementation with estrogen and/or overexpression of estrogen receptor β gene may prove to be effective means to treat stress-induced myocardial damage. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Altered Adipogenesis in Zebrafish Larvae Following High Fat Diet and Chemical Exposure Is Visualised by Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 894; doi:10.3390/ijms18040894 -
Abstract
Early life stage exposure to environmental chemicals may play a role in obesity by altering adipogenesis; however, robust in vivo methods to quantify these effects are lacking. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of developmental exposure to chemicals on
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Early life stage exposure to environmental chemicals may play a role in obesity by altering adipogenesis; however, robust in vivo methods to quantify these effects are lacking. The goal of this study was to analyze the effects of developmental exposure to chemicals on adipogenesis in the zebrafish (Danio rerio). We used label-free Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy for the first time to image zebrafish adipogenesis at 15 days post fertilization (dpf) and compared standard feed conditions (StF) to a high fat diet (HFD) or high glucose diet (HGD). We also exposed zebrafish embryos to a non-toxic concentration of tributyltin (TBT, 1 nM) or Tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate (TDCiPP, 0.5 µM) from 0–6 dpf and reared larvae to 15 dpf under StF. Potential molecular mechanisms of altered adipogenesis were examined by qPCR. Diet-dependent modulation of adipogenesis was observed, with HFD resulting in a threefold increase in larvae with adipocytes, compared to StF and HGD. Developmental exposure to TBT but not TDCiPP significantly increased adipocyte differentiation. The expression of adipogenic genes such as pparda, lxr and lepa was altered in response to HFD or chemicals. This study shows that SRS microscopy can be successfully applied to zebrafish to visualize and quantify adipogenesis, and is a powerful approach for identifying obesogenic chemicals in vivo. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Mediated Perfluorooctane Sulfonate Induced-Neurotoxicity via Epigenetics Regulation in SK-N-SH Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 893; doi:10.3390/ijms18040893 -
Abstract
Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a new kind of persistent organic pollutant, is widely distributed in the environment and exists in various organisms, where it is also a neurotoxic compound. However, the potential mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still unclear. To examine the role of
[...] Read more.
Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), a new kind of persistent organic pollutant, is widely distributed in the environment and exists in various organisms, where it is also a neurotoxic compound. However, the potential mechanism of its neurotoxicity is still unclear. To examine the role of epigenetics in the neurotoxicity induced by PFOS, SK-N-SH cells were treated with different concentrations of PFOS or control medium (0.1% DMSO) for 48 h. The mRNA levels of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), microRNA-16, microRNA-22, and microRNA-30a-5p were detected by Quantitative PCR (QPCR). Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) was used to measure the protein levels of BDNF, and a western blot was applied to analyze the protein levels of DNMTs. Bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP) was used to detect the methylation status of the BDNF promoter I and IV. Results of MTT assays indicated that treatment with PFOS could lead to a significant decrease of cell viability, and the treated cells became shrunk. In addition, PFOS exposure decreased the expression of BDNF at mRNA and protein levels, increased the expression of microRNA-16, microRNA-22, microRNA-30a-5p, and decreased the expression of DNMT1 at mRNA and protein levels, but increased the expression of DNMT3b at mRNA and protein levels. Our results also demonstrate that PFOS exposure changes the methylation status of BDNF promoter I and IV. The findings of the present study suggest that methylation regulation of BDNF gene promoter and increases of BDNF-related-microRNA might underlie the mechanisms of PFOS-induced neurotoxicity. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Health Effects of Psidium guajava L. Leaves: An Overview of the Last Decade
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 897; doi:10.3390/ijms18040897 -
Abstract
Today, there is increasing interest in discovering new bioactive compounds derived from ethnomedicine. Preparations of guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaves have traditionally been used to manage several diseases. The pharmacological research in vitro as well as in vivo has been widely used
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Today, there is increasing interest in discovering new bioactive compounds derived from ethnomedicine. Preparations of guava (Psidium guajava L.) leaves have traditionally been used to manage several diseases. The pharmacological research in vitro as well as in vivo has been widely used to demonstrate the potential of the extracts from the leaves for the co-treatment of different ailments with high prevalence worldwide, upholding the traditional medicine in cases such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and parasitic infections. Moreover, the biological activity has been attributed to the bioactive composition of the leaves, to some specific phytochemical subclasses, or even to individual compounds. Phenolic compounds in guava leaves have been credited with regulating blood-glucose levels. Thus, the aim of the present review was to compile results from in vitro and in vivo studies carried out with guava leaves over the last decade, relating the effects to their clinical applications in order to focus further research for finding individual bioactive compounds. Some food applications (guava tea and supplementary feed for aquaculture) and some clinical, in vitro, and in vivo outcomes are also included. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Glyoxalase Goes Green: The Expanding Roles of Glyoxalase in Plants
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 898; doi:10.3390/ijms18040898 -
Abstract
The ubiquitous glyoxalase enzymatic pathway is involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG), a cytotoxic byproduct of glycolysis. The glyoxalase system has been more extensively studied in animals versus plants. Plant glyoxalases have been primarily associated with stress responses and their overexpression is
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The ubiquitous glyoxalase enzymatic pathway is involved in the detoxification of methylglyoxal (MG), a cytotoxic byproduct of glycolysis. The glyoxalase system has been more extensively studied in animals versus plants. Plant glyoxalases have been primarily associated with stress responses and their overexpression is known to impart tolerance to various abiotic stresses. In plants, glyoxalases exist as multigene families, and new roles for glyoxalases in various developmental and signaling pathways have started to emerge. Glyoxalase-based MG detoxification has now been shown to be important for pollination responses. During self-incompatibility response in Brassicaceae, MG is required to target compatibility factors for proteasomal degradation, while accumulation of glyoxalase leads to MG detoxification and efficient pollination. In this review, we discuss the importance of glyoxalase systems and their emerging biological roles in plants. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Commitment of Scaffold Proteins in the Onco-Biology of Human Colorectal Cancer and Liver Metastases after Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 891; doi:10.3390/ijms18040891 -
Abstract
Scaffold proteins play pivotal roles in the regulation of signaling pathways, integrating external and internal stimuli to various cellular outputs. We report the pattern of cellular and subcellular expression of scaffoldins angiomotin-like 2 (AmotL2), FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP51) and IQ motif containing
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Scaffold proteins play pivotal roles in the regulation of signaling pathways, integrating external and internal stimuli to various cellular outputs. We report the pattern of cellular and subcellular expression of scaffoldins angiomotin-like 2 (AmotL2), FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP51) and IQ motif containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) in colorectal cancer (CRC) and metastases in liver resected after oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy (CT). Positive immunostaining for the three scaffoldins was found in most cells in healthy colon, tumor, healthy liver and metastasized liver. The patterns of expression of AmotL2, FKBP51 and IQGAP1 show the greatest variability in immune system cells and neurons and glia cells and the least in blood vessel cells. The simultaneous subcellular localization in tumor cells and other cell types within the tumor suggest an involvement of these three scaffoldins in cancer biology, including a role in Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition. The display in differential localization and quantitative expression of AmotL2, FKBP51, and IQGAP1 could be used as biomarkers for more accurate tumor staging and as potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutics by blocking or slowing down their interconnecting functions. Tough further research needs to be done in order to improve these assessments. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Pathogenic or Therapeutic Extracellular Vesicles in Rheumatic Diseases: Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Vesicles
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2017, 18(4), 889; doi:10.3390/ijms18040889 -
Abstract
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication pathways via the transport of proteins, mRNA, miRNA and lipids. There are three main types of EVs, exosomes, microparticles and apoptotic bodies, which are classified according to their size and biogenesis. EVs are secreted
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Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are important mediators of cell-to-cell communication pathways via the transport of proteins, mRNA, miRNA and lipids. There are three main types of EVs, exosomes, microparticles and apoptotic bodies, which are classified according to their size and biogenesis. EVs are secreted by all cell types and their function reproduces that of the parental cell. They are involved in many biological processes that regulate tissue homeostasis and physiopathology of diseases. In rheumatic diseases, namely osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), EVs have been isolated from synovial fluid and shown to play pathogenic roles contributing to progression of both diseases. By contrast, EVs may have therapeutic effect via the delivery of molecules that may stop disease evolution. In particular, EVs derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) reproduce the main functions of the parental cells and therefore represent the ideal type of EVs for modulating the course of either disease. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of EVs in OA and RA focusing on their potential pathogenic effect and possible therapeutic options. Special attention is given to MSCs and MSC-derived EVs for modulating OA and RA progression with the perspective of developing innovative therapeutic strategies. Full article