Open AccessArticle
Sustainable Financial Obligations and Crisis Cycles
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 27; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020027 -
Abstract
The ability to distinguish between sustainable and excessive debt developments is crucial for securing economic stability. By studying US private sector credit loss dynamics, we show that this distinction can be made based on a measure of the incipient aggregate liquidity constraint, the
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The ability to distinguish between sustainable and excessive debt developments is crucial for securing economic stability. By studying US private sector credit loss dynamics, we show that this distinction can be made based on a measure of the incipient aggregate liquidity constraint, the financial obligations ratio. Specifically, as this variable rises, the interaction between credit losses and the business cycle increases, albeit with different intensity depending on whether the problems originate in the household or the business sector. This occurs 1–2 years before each recession in the sample. Our results have implications for macroprudential policy and countercyclical capital-buffers. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Spatial Econometric Analysis of the Calls to the Portuguese National Health Line
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 24; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020024 -
Abstract
The Portuguese National Health Line, LS24, is an initiative of the Portuguese Health Ministry which seeks to improve accessibility to health care and to rationalize the use of existing resources by directing users to the most appropriate institutions of the national public health
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The Portuguese National Health Line, LS24, is an initiative of the Portuguese Health Ministry which seeks to improve accessibility to health care and to rationalize the use of existing resources by directing users to the most appropriate institutions of the national public health services. This study aims to describe and evaluate the use of LS24. Since for LS24 data, the location attribute is an important source of information to describe its use, this study analyses the number of calls received, at a municipal level, under two different spatial econometric approaches. This analysis is important for future development of decision support indicators in a hospital context, based on the economic impact of the use of this health line. Considering the discrete nature of data, the number of calls to LS24 in each municipality is better modelled by a Poisson model, with some possible covariates: demographic, socio-economic information, characteristics of the Portuguese health system and development indicators. In order to explain model spatial variability, the data autocorrelation can be explained in a Bayesian setting through different hierarchical log-Poisson regression models. A different approach uses an autoregressive methodology, also for count data. A log-Poisson model with a spatial lag autocorrelation component is further considered, better framed under a Bayesian paradigm. With this empirical study we find strong evidence for a spatial structure in the data and obtain similar conclusions with both perspectives of the analysis. This supports the view that the addition of a spatial structure to the model improves estimation, even in the case where some relevant covariates have been included. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Realized Hierarchical Archimedean Copula in Risk Modelling
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 26; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020026 -
Abstract
This paper introduces the concept of the realized hierarchical Archimedean copula (rHAC). The proposed approach inherits the ability of the copula to capture the dependencies among financial time series, and combines it with additional information contained in high-frequency data. The considered model does
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This paper introduces the concept of the realized hierarchical Archimedean copula (rHAC). The proposed approach inherits the ability of the copula to capture the dependencies among financial time series, and combines it with additional information contained in high-frequency data. The considered model does not suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and is able to accurately predict high-dimensional distributions. This flexibility is obtained by using a hierarchical structure in the copula. The time variability of the model is provided by daily forecasts of the realized correlation matrix, which is used to estimate the structure and the parameters of the rHAC. Extensive simulation studies show the validity of the estimator based on this realized correlation matrix, and its performance, in comparison to the benchmark models. The application of the estimator to one-day-ahead Value at Risk (VaR) prediction using high-frequency data exhibits good forecasting properties for a multivariate portfolio. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Improved Inference on Cointegrating Vectors in the Presence of a near Unit Root Using Adjusted Quantiles
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 25; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020025 -
Abstract
It is well known that inference on the cointegrating relations in a vector autoregression (CVAR) is difficult in the presence of a near unit root. The test for a given cointegration vector can have rejection probabilities under the null, which vary from the
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It is well known that inference on the cointegrating relations in a vector autoregression (CVAR) is difficult in the presence of a near unit root. The test for a given cointegration vector can have rejection probabilities under the null, which vary from the nominal size to more than 90%. This paper formulates a CVAR model allowing for multiple near unit roots and analyses the asymptotic properties of the Gaussian maximum likelihood estimator. Then two critical value adjustments suggested by McCloskey (2017) for the test on the cointegrating relations are implemented for the model with a single near unit root, and it is found by simulation that they eliminate the serious size distortions, with a reasonable power for moderate values of the near unit root parameter. The findings are illustrated with an analysis of a number of different bivariate DGPs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Dependence between Stock Returns of Italian Banks and the Sovereign Risk
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 23; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020023 -
Abstract
We analyze the interdependence between the government yield spread and stock returns of the banking sector in Italy during the years 2003–2015. In a first step, we find that the Spearman’s rank correlation between the yield spread and the Italian banking system changed
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We analyze the interdependence between the government yield spread and stock returns of the banking sector in Italy during the years 2003–2015. In a first step, we find that the Spearman’s rank correlation between the yield spread and the Italian banking system changed significantly after September 2008. According to this finding, we split the time window in two sub-periods. While we show that the dependence between the banking industry and changes in the yield spread increased significantly in the second time interval, we find no contagion effects from changes in the yield spread to returns of the banking system. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Unit Roots and Structural Breaks
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 22; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020022 -
Open AccessArticle
Bayesian Inference for Latent Factor Copulas and Application to Financial Risk Forecasting
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 21; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020021 -
Abstract
Factor modeling is a popular strategy to induce sparsity in multivariate models as they scale to higher dimensions. We develop Bayesian inference for a recently proposed latent factor copula model, which utilizes a pair copula construction to couple the variables with the latent
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Factor modeling is a popular strategy to induce sparsity in multivariate models as they scale to higher dimensions. We develop Bayesian inference for a recently proposed latent factor copula model, which utilizes a pair copula construction to couple the variables with the latent factor. We use adaptive rejection Metropolis sampling (ARMS) within Gibbs sampling for posterior simulation: Gibbs sampling enables application to Bayesian problems, while ARMS is an adaptive strategy that replaces traditional Metropolis-Hastings updates, which typically require careful tuning. Our simulation study shows favorable performance of our proposed approach both in terms of sampling efficiency and accuracy. We provide an extensive application example using historical data on European financial stocks that forecasts portfolio Value at Risk (VaR) and Expected Shortfall (ES). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Copula-Based Factor Models for Multivariate Asset Returns
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 20; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020020 -
Abstract
Recently, several copula-based approaches have been proposed for modeling stationary multivariate time series. All of them are based on vine copulas, and they differ in the choice of the regular vine structure. In this article, we consider a copula autoregressive (COPAR) approach to
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Recently, several copula-based approaches have been proposed for modeling stationary multivariate time series. All of them are based on vine copulas, and they differ in the choice of the regular vine structure. In this article, we consider a copula autoregressive (COPAR) approach to model the dependence of unobserved multivariate factors resulting from two dynamic factor models. However, the proposed methodology is general and applicable to several factor models as well as to other copula models for stationary multivariate time series. An empirical study illustrates the forecasting superiority of our approach for constructing an optimal portfolio of U.S. industrial stocks in the mean-variance framework. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Maximum Likelihood Estimation of the I(2) Model under Linear Restrictions
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 19; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020019 -
Abstract
Estimation of the I(2) cointegrated vector autoregressive (CVAR) model is considered. Without further restrictions, estimation of the I(1) model is by reduced-rank regression (Anderson (1951)). Maximum likelihood estimation of I(2) models, on the other hand, always requires iteration. This paper presents a new
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Estimation of the I(2) cointegrated vector autoregressive (CVAR) model is considered. Without further restrictions, estimation of the I(1) model is by reduced-rank regression (Anderson (1951)). Maximum likelihood estimation of I(2) models, on the other hand, always requires iteration. This paper presents a new triangular representation of the I(2) model. This is the basis for a new estimation procedure of the unrestricted I(2) model, as well as the I(2) model with linear restrictions imposed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Univariate Collapsing Method for Portfolio Optimization
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 18; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020018 -
Abstract
The univariate collapsing method (UCM) for portfolio optimization is based on obtaining the predictive mean and a risk measure such as variance or expected shortfall of the univariate pseudo-return series generated from a given set of portfolio weights and multivariate set of assets
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The univariate collapsing method (UCM) for portfolio optimization is based on obtaining the predictive mean and a risk measure such as variance or expected shortfall of the univariate pseudo-return series generated from a given set of portfolio weights and multivariate set of assets under interest and, via simulation or optimization, repeating this process until the desired portfolio weight vector is obtained. The UCM is well-known conceptually, straightforward to implement, and possesses several advantages over use of multivariate models, but, among other things, has been criticized for being too slow. As such, it does not play prominently in asset allocation and receives little attention in the academic literature. This paper proposes use of fast model estimation methods combined with new heuristics for sampling, based on easily-determined characteristics of the data, to accelerate and optimize the simulation search. An extensive empirical analysis confirms the viability of the method. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Selecting the Lag Length for the MGLS Unit Root Tests with Structural Change: A Warning Note for Practitioners Based on Simulations
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 17; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020017 -
Abstract
This is a simulation-based warning note for practitioners who use the MGLS unit root tests in the context of structural change using different selection lag length criteria. With T=100, we find severe oversize problems when using some
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This is a simulation-based warning note for practitioners who use the MGLS unit root tests in the context of structural change using different selection lag length criteria. With T=100, we find severe oversize problems when using some criteria, while other criteria produce an undersizing behavior. In view of this dilemma, we do not recommend using these tests. While such behavior tends to disappear when T=250, it is important to note that most empirical applications use smaller sample sizes such as T=100 or T=150. The ADFGLS test does not present an oversizing or undersizing problem. The only disadvantage of the ADFGLS test arises in the presence of MA(1) negative correlation, in which case the MGLS tests are preferable, but in all other cases they are very undersized. When there is a break in the series, selecting the breakpoint using the Supremum method greatly improves the results relative to the Infimum method. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Copula–Based vMEM Specifications versus Alternatives: The Case of Trading Activity
Econometrics 2017, 5(2), 16; doi:10.3390/econometrics5020016 -
Abstract
We discuss several multivariate extensions of the Multiplicative Error Model to take into account dynamic interdependence and contemporaneously correlated innovations (vector MEM or vMEM). We suggest copula functions to link Gamma marginals of the innovations, in a specification where past values and conditional
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We discuss several multivariate extensions of the Multiplicative Error Model to take into account dynamic interdependence and contemporaneously correlated innovations (vector MEM or vMEM). We suggest copula functions to link Gamma marginals of the innovations, in a specification where past values and conditional expectations of the variables can be simultaneously estimated. Results with realized volatility, volumes and number of trades of the JNJ stock show that significantly superior realized volatility forecasts are delivered with a fully interdependent vMEM relative to a single equation. Alternatives involving log–Normal or semiparametric formulations produce substantially equivalent results. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Accuracy and Efficiency of Various GMM Inference Techniques in Dynamic Micro Panel Data Models
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 14; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010014 -
Abstract
Studies employing Arellano-Bond and Blundell-Bond generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation for linear dynamic panel data models are growing exponentially in number. However, for researchers it is hard to make a reasoned choice between many different possible implementations of these estimators and associated
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Studies employing Arellano-Bond and Blundell-Bond generalized method of moments (GMM) estimation for linear dynamic panel data models are growing exponentially in number. However, for researchers it is hard to make a reasoned choice between many different possible implementations of these estimators and associated tests. By simulation, the effects are examined in terms of many options regarding: (i) reducing, extending or modifying the set of instruments; (ii) specifying the weighting matrix in relation to the type of heteroskedasticity; (iii) using (robustified) 1-step or (corrected) 2-step variance estimators; (iv) employing 1-step or 2-step residuals in Sargan-Hansen overall or incremental overidentification restrictions tests. This is all done for models in which some regressors may be either strictly exogenous, predetermined or endogenous. Surprisingly, particular asymptotically optimal and relatively robust weighting matrices are found to be superior in finite samples to ostensibly more appropriate versions. Most of the variants of tests for overidentification and coefficient restrictions show serious deficiencies. The variance of the individual effects is shown to be a major determinant of the poor quality of most asymptotic approximations; therefore, the accurate estimation of this nuisance parameter is investigated. A modification of GMM is found to have some potential when the cross-sectional heteroskedasticity is pronounced and the time-series dimension of the sample is not too small. Finally, all techniques are employed to actual data and lead to insights which differ considerably from those published earlier. Full article
Open AccessArticle
A Simple Test for Causality in Volatility
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 15; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010015 -
Abstract
An early development in testing for causality (technically, Granger non-causality) in the conditional variance (or volatility) associated with financial returns was the portmanteau statistic for non-causality in the variance of Cheng and Ng (1996). A subsequent development was the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) test
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An early development in testing for causality (technically, Granger non-causality) in the conditional variance (or volatility) associated with financial returns was the portmanteau statistic for non-causality in the variance of Cheng and Ng (1996). A subsequent development was the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) test of non-causality in the conditional variance by Hafner and Herwartz (2006), who provided simulation results to show that their LM test was more powerful than the portmanteau statistic for sample sizes of 1000 and 4000 observations. While the LM test for causality proposed by Hafner and Herwartz (2006) is an interesting and useful development, it is nonetheless arbitrary. In particular, the specification on which the LM test is based does not rely on an underlying stochastic process, so the alternative hypothesis is also arbitrary, which can affect the power of the test. The purpose of the paper is to derive a simple test for causality in volatility that provides regularity conditions arising from the underlying stochastic process, namely a random coefficient autoregressive process, and a test for which the (quasi-) maximum likelihood estimates have valid asymptotic properties under the null hypothesis of non-causality. The simple test is intuitively appealing as it is based on an underlying stochastic process, is sympathetic to Granger’s (1969, 1988) notion of time series predictability, is easy to implement, and has a regularity condition that is not available in the LM test. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Goodness-of-Fit Tests for Copulas of Multivariate Time Series
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 13; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010013 -
Abstract
In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of the sequential empirical process and the sequential empirical copula process, both constructed from residuals of multivariate stochastic volatility models. Applications for the detection of structural changes and specification tests of the distribution of innovations
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In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of the sequential empirical process and the sequential empirical copula process, both constructed from residuals of multivariate stochastic volatility models. Applications for the detection of structural changes and specification tests of the distribution of innovations are discussed. It is also shown that if the stochastic volatility matrices are diagonal, which is the case if the univariate time series are estimated separately instead of being jointly estimated, then the empirical copula process behaves as if the innovations were observed; a remarkable property. As a by-product, one also obtains the asymptotic behavior of rank-based measures of dependence applied to residuals of these time series models.
Full article
Open AccessArticle
Testing for a Structural Break in a Spatial Panel Model
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 12; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010012 -
Abstract
We consider the problem of testing for a structural break in the spatial lag parameter in a panel model (spatial autoregressive). We propose a likelihood ratio test of the null hypothesis of no break against the alternative hypothesis of a single break. The
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We consider the problem of testing for a structural break in the spatial lag parameter in a panel model (spatial autoregressive). We propose a likelihood ratio test of the null hypothesis of no break against the alternative hypothesis of a single break. The limiting distribution of the test is derived under the null when both the number of individual units N and the number of time periods T is large or N is fixed and T is large. The asymptotic critical values of the test statistic can be obtained analytically. We also propose a break-date estimator that can be employed to determine the location of the break point following evidence against the null hypothesis. We present Monte Carlo evidence to show that the proposed procedure performs well in finite samples. Finally, we consider an empirical application of the test on budget spillovers and interdependence in fiscal policy within the U.S. states. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Structural Breaks, Inflation and Interest Rates: Evidence from the G7 Countries
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 11; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010011 -
Abstract
This study reconsiders the common unit root/co-integration approach to test for the Fisher effect for the economies of the G7 countries. We first show that nominal interest and inflation rates are better represented as I(0) variables. Later, we use the Bai–Perron procedure to
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This study reconsiders the common unit root/co-integration approach to test for the Fisher effect for the economies of the G7 countries. We first show that nominal interest and inflation rates are better represented as I(0) variables. Later, we use the Bai–Perron procedure to show the existence of structural changes in the Fisher equation. After considering these breaks, we find very limited evidence of a total Fisher effect as the transmission coefficient of the expected inflation rates to nominal interest rates is very different than one. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Note on Identification of Bivariate Copulas for Discrete Count Data
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 10; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010010 -
Abstract
Copulas have enjoyed increased usage in many areas of econometrics, including applications with discrete outcomes. However, Genest and Nešlehová (2007) present evidence that copulas for discrete outcomes are not identified, particularly when those discrete outcomes follow count distributions. This paper confirms the Genest
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Copulas have enjoyed increased usage in many areas of econometrics, including applications with discrete outcomes. However, Genest and Nešlehová (2007) present evidence that copulas for discrete outcomes are not identified, particularly when those discrete outcomes follow count distributions. This paper confirms the Genest and Nešlehová result using a series of simulation exercises. The paper then proceeds to show that those identification concerns diminish if the model has a regression structure such that the exogenous variable(s) generates additional variation in the outcomes and thus more completely covers the outcome domain. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Endogeneity, Time-Varying Coefficients, and Incorrect vs. Correct Ways of Specifying the Error Terms of Econometric Models
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 8; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010008 -
Abstract
Using the net effect of all relevant regressors omitted from a model to form its error term is incorrect because the coefficients and error term of such a model are non-unique. Non-unique coefficients cannot possess consistent estimators. Uniqueness can be achieved if; instead;
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Using the net effect of all relevant regressors omitted from a model to form its error term is incorrect because the coefficients and error term of such a model are non-unique. Non-unique coefficients cannot possess consistent estimators. Uniqueness can be achieved if; instead; one uses certain “sufficient sets” of (relevant) regressors omitted from each model to represent the error term. In this case; the unique coefficient on any non-constant regressor takes the form of the sum of a bias-free component and omitted-regressor biases. Measurement-error bias can also be incorporated into this sum. We show that if our procedures are followed; accurate estimation of bias-free components is possible. Full article
Open AccessArticle
A Fast Algorithm for the Computation of HAC Covariance Matrix Estimators
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 9; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010009 -
Abstract
This paper considers the algorithmic implementation of the heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation consistent (HAC) estimation problem for covariance matrices of parameter estimators. We introduce a new algorithm, mainly based on the fast Fourier transform, and show via computer simulation that our algorithm is up
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This paper considers the algorithmic implementation of the heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation consistent (HAC) estimation problem for covariance matrices of parameter estimators. We introduce a new algorithm, mainly based on the fast Fourier transform, and show via computer simulation that our algorithm is up to 20 times faster than well-established alternative algorithms. The cumulative effect is substantial if the HAC estimation problem has to be solved repeatedly. Moreover, the bandwidth parameter has no impact on this performance. We provide a general description of the new algorithm as well as code for a reference implementation in R. Full article
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