Open AccessArticle
Structural Breaks, Inflation and Interest Rates: Evidence from the G7 Countries
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 11; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010011 -
Abstract
This study reconsiders the common unit root/co-integration approach to test for the Fisher effect for the economies of the G7 countries. We first show that nominal interest and inflation rates are better represented as I(0) variables. Later, we use the Bai–Perron procedure to
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This study reconsiders the common unit root/co-integration approach to test for the Fisher effect for the economies of the G7 countries. We first show that nominal interest and inflation rates are better represented as I(0) variables. Later, we use the Bai–Perron procedure to show the existence of structural changes in the Fisher equation. After considering these breaks, we find very limited evidence of a total Fisher effect as the transmission coefficient of the expected inflation rates to nominal interest rates is very different than one. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Note on Identification of Bivariate Copulas for Discrete Count Data
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 10; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010010 -
Abstract
Copulas have enjoyed increased usage in many areas of econometrics, including applications with discrete outcomes. However, Genest and Nešlehová (2007) present evidence that copulas for discrete outcomes are not identified, particularly when those discrete outcomes follow count distributions. This paper confirms the Genest
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Copulas have enjoyed increased usage in many areas of econometrics, including applications with discrete outcomes. However, Genest and Nešlehová (2007) present evidence that copulas for discrete outcomes are not identified, particularly when those discrete outcomes follow count distributions. This paper confirms the Genest and Nešlehová result using a series of simulation exercises. The paper then proceeds to show that those identification concerns diminish if the model has a regression structure such that the exogenous variable(s) generates additional variation in the outcomes and thus more completely covers the outcome domain. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Endogeneity, Time-Varying Coefficients, and Incorrect vs. Correct Ways of Specifying the Error Terms of Econometric Models
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 8; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010008 -
Abstract
Using the net effect of all relevant regressors omitted from a model to form its error term is incorrect because the coefficients and error term of such a model are non-unique. Non-unique coefficients cannot possess consistent estimators. Uniqueness can be achieved if; instead;
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Using the net effect of all relevant regressors omitted from a model to form its error term is incorrect because the coefficients and error term of such a model are non-unique. Non-unique coefficients cannot possess consistent estimators. Uniqueness can be achieved if; instead; one uses certain “sufficient sets” of (relevant) regressors omitted from each model to represent the error term. In this case; the unique coefficient on any non-constant regressor takes the form of the sum of a bias-free component and omitted-regressor biases. Measurement-error bias can also be incorporated into this sum. We show that if our procedures are followed; accurate estimation of bias-free components is possible. Full article
Open AccessArticle
A Fast Algorithm for the Computation of HAC Covariance Matrix Estimators
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 9; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010009 -
Abstract
This paper considers the algorithmic implementation of the heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation consistent (HAC) estimation problem for covariance matrices of parameter estimators. We introduce a new algorithm, mainly based on the fast Fourier transform, and show via computer simulation that our algorithm is up
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This paper considers the algorithmic implementation of the heteroskedasticity and autocorrelation consistent (HAC) estimation problem for covariance matrices of parameter estimators. We introduce a new algorithm, mainly based on the fast Fourier transform, and show via computer simulation that our algorithm is up to 20 times faster than well-established alternative algorithms. The cumulative effect is substantial if the HAC estimation problem has to be solved repeatedly. Moreover, the bandwidth parameter has no impact on this performance. We provide a general description of the new algorithm as well as code for a reference implementation in R. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Between Institutions and Global Forces: Norwegian Wage Formation Since Industrialisation
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 6; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010006 -
Abstract
This paper reviews the development of labour market institutions in Norway, shows how labour market regulation has been related to the macroeconomic development, and presents dynamic econometric models of nominal and real wages. Single equation and multi-equation models are reported. The econometric modelling
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This paper reviews the development of labour market institutions in Norway, shows how labour market regulation has been related to the macroeconomic development, and presents dynamic econometric models of nominal and real wages. Single equation and multi-equation models are reported. The econometric modelling uses a new data set with historical time series of wages and prices, unemployment and labour productivity. Impulse indicator saturation is used to achieve robust estimation of focus parameters, and the breaks are interpreted in the light of the historical overview. A relatively high degree of constancy of the key parameters of the wage setting equation is documented, over a considerably longer historical time period than earlier studies have done. The evidence is consistent with the view that the evolving system of collective labour market regulation over long periods has delivered a certain necessary level of coordination of wage and price setting. Nevertheless, there is also evidence that global forces have been at work for a long time, in a way that links real wages to productivity trends in the same way as in countries with very different institutions and macroeconomic development. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Econometrics in 2016
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 7; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010007 -
Abstract The editors of Econometrics would like to express their sincere gratitude to the following  reviewers for assessing manuscripts in 2016.[...] Full article
Open AccessArticle
Fractional Unit Root Tests Allowing for a Structural Change in Trend under Both the Null and Alternative Hypotheses
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 5; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010005 -
Abstract
This paper considers testing procedures for the null hypothesis of a unit root process against the alternative of a fractional process, called a fractional unit root test. We extend the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) tests of Robinson (1994) and Tanaka (1999), which are locally
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This paper considers testing procedures for the null hypothesis of a unit root process against the alternative of a fractional process, called a fractional unit root test. We extend the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) tests of Robinson (1994) and Tanaka (1999), which are locally best invariant and uniformly most powerful, to allow for a slope change in trend with or without a concurrent level shift under both the null and alternative hypotheses. We show that the limit distribution of the proposed LM tests is standard normal. Finite sample simulation experiments show that the tests have good size and power. As an empirical analysis, we apply the tests to the Consumer Price Indices of the G7 countries. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Consistency of Trend Break Point Estimator with Underspecified Break Number
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 4; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010004 -
Abstract
This paper discusses the consistency of trend break point estimators when the number of breaks is underspecified. The consistency of break point estimators in a simple location model with level shifts has been well documented by researchers under various settings, including extensions such
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This paper discusses the consistency of trend break point estimators when the number of breaks is underspecified. The consistency of break point estimators in a simple location model with level shifts has been well documented by researchers under various settings, including extensions such as allowing a time trend in the model. Despite the consistency of break point estimators of level shifts, there are few papers on the consistency of trend shift break point estimators in the presence of an underspecified break number. The simulation study and asymptotic analysis in this paper show that the trend shift break point estimator does not converge to the true break points when the break number is underspecified. In the case of two trend shifts, the inconsistency problem worsens if the magnitudes of the breaks are similar and the breaks are either both positive or both negative. The limiting distribution for the trend break point estimator is developed and closely approximates the finite sample performance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Business Cycle Estimation with High-Pass and Band-Pass Local Polynomial Regression
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 1; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010001 -
Abstract
Filters constructed on the basis of standard local polynomial regression (LPR) methods have been used in the literature to estimate the business cycle. We provide a frequency domain interpretation of the contrast filter obtained by the difference of a series and its long-run
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Filters constructed on the basis of standard local polynomial regression (LPR) methods have been used in the literature to estimate the business cycle. We provide a frequency domain interpretation of the contrast filter obtained by the difference of a series and its long-run LPR component and show that it operates as a kind of high-pass filter, so that it provides a noisy estimate of the cycle. We alternatively propose band-pass local polynomial regression methods aimed at isolating the cyclical component. Results are compared to standard high-pass and band-pass filters. Procedures are illustrated using the US GDP series. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Regime Switching Vine Copula Models for Global Equity and Volatility Indices
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 3; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010003 -
Abstract
For nearly every major stock market there exist equity and implied volatility indices. These play important roles within finance: be it as a benchmark, a measure of general uncertainty or a way of investing or hedging. It is well known in the academic
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For nearly every major stock market there exist equity and implied volatility indices. These play important roles within finance: be it as a benchmark, a measure of general uncertainty or a way of investing or hedging. It is well known in the academic literature that correlations and higher moments between different indices tend to vary in time. However, to the best of our knowledge, no one has yet considered a global setup including both equity and implied volatility indices of various continents, and allowing for a changing dependence structure. We aim to close this gap by applying Markov-switching R-vine models to investigate the existence of different, global dependence regimes. In particular, we identify times of “normal” and “abnormal” states within a data set consisting of North-American, European and Asian indices. Our results confirm the existence of joint points in a time at which global regime switching between two different R-vine structures takes place. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fixed-b Inference for Testing Structural Change in a Time Series Regression
Econometrics 2017, 5(1), 2; doi:10.3390/econometrics5010002 -
Abstract
This paper addresses tests for structural change in a weakly dependent time series regression. The cases of full structural change and partial structural change are considered. Heteroskedasticity-autocorrelation (HAC) robust Wald tests based on nonparametric covariance matrix estimators are explored. Fixed-b theory is
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This paper addresses tests for structural change in a weakly dependent time series regression. The cases of full structural change and partial structural change are considered. Heteroskedasticity-autocorrelation (HAC) robust Wald tests based on nonparametric covariance matrix estimators are explored. Fixed-b theory is developed for the HAC estimators which allows fixed-b approximations for the test statistics. For the case of the break date being known, the fixed-b limits of the statistics depend on the break fraction and the bandwidth tuning parameter as well as on the kernel. When the break date is unknown, supremum, mean and exponential Wald statistics are commonly used for testing the presence of the structural break. Fixed-b limits of these statistics are obtained and critical values are tabulated. A simulation study compares the finite sample properties of existing tests and proposed tests. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Status of Bridge Principles in Applied Econometrics
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 50; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040050 -
Abstract
The paper begins with a figurative representation of the contrast between present-day and formal applied econometrics. An explication of the status of bridge principles in applied econometrics follows. To illustrate the concepts used in the explication, the paper presents a simultaneous-equation model of
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The paper begins with a figurative representation of the contrast between present-day and formal applied econometrics. An explication of the status of bridge principles in applied econometrics follows. To illustrate the concepts used in the explication, the paper presents a simultaneous-equation model of the equilibrium configurations of a perfectly competitive commodity market. With artificially generated data I carry out two empirical analyses of such a market that contrast the prescriptions of formal econometrics in the tradition of Ragnar Frisch with the commands of present-day econometrics in the tradition of Trygve Haavelmo. At the end I demonstrate that the bridge principles I use in the formal-econometric analysis are valid in the Real World—that is in the world in which my data reside. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Testing for the Equality of Integration Orders of Multiple Series
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 49; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040049 -
Abstract
Testing for the equality of integration orders is an important topic in time series analysis because it constitutes an essential step in testing for (fractional) cointegration in the bivariate case. For the multivariate case, there are several versions of cointegration, and the version
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Testing for the equality of integration orders is an important topic in time series analysis because it constitutes an essential step in testing for (fractional) cointegration in the bivariate case. For the multivariate case, there are several versions of cointegration, and the version given in Robinson and Yajima (2002) has received much attention. In this definition, a time series vector is partitioned into several sub-vectors, and the elements in each sub-vector have the same integration order. Furthermore, this time series vector is said to be cointegrated if there exists a cointegration in any of the sub-vectors. Under such a circumstance, testing for the equality of integration orders constitutes an important problem. However, for multivariate fractionally integrated series, most tests focus on stationary and invertible series and become invalid under the presence of cointegration. Hualde (2013) overcomes these difficulties with a residual-based test for a bivariate time series. For the multivariate case, one possible extension of this test involves testing for an array of bivariate series, which becomes computationally challenging as the dimension of the time series increases. In this paper, a one-step residual-based test is proposed to deal with the multivariate case that overcomes the computational issue. Under certain regularity conditions, the test statistic has an asymptotic standard normal distribution under the null hypothesis of equal integration orders and diverges to infinity under the alternative. As reported in a Monte Carlo experiment, the proposed test possesses satisfactory sizes and powers. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Higher Order Bias Correcting Moment Equation for M-Estimation and Its Higher Order Efficiency
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 48; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040048 -
Abstract
This paper studies an alternative bias correction for the M-estimator, which is obtained by correcting the moment equations in the spirit of Firth (1993). In particular, this paper compares the stochastic expansions of the analytically-bias-corrected estimator and the alternative estimator and finds that
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This paper studies an alternative bias correction for the M-estimator, which is obtained by correcting the moment equations in the spirit of Firth (1993). In particular, this paper compares the stochastic expansions of the analytically-bias-corrected estimator and the alternative estimator and finds that the third-order stochastic expansions of these two estimators are identical. This implies that at least in terms of the third-order stochastic expansion, we cannot improve on the simple one-step bias correction by using the bias correction of moment equations. This finding suggests that the comparison between the one-step bias correction and the method of correcting the moment equations or the fully-iterated bias correction should be based on the stochastic expansions higher than the third order. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Subset-Continuous-Updating GMM Estimators for Dynamic Panel Data Models
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 47; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040047 -
Abstract
The two-step GMM estimators of Arellano and Bond (1991) and Blundell and Bond (1998) for dynamic panel data models have been widely used in empirical work; however, neither of them performs well in small samples with weak instruments. The continuous-updating GMM estimator proposed
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The two-step GMM estimators of Arellano and Bond (1991) and Blundell and Bond (1998) for dynamic panel data models have been widely used in empirical work; however, neither of them performs well in small samples with weak instruments. The continuous-updating GMM estimator proposed by Hansen, Heaton, and Yaron (1996) is in principle able to reduce the small-sample bias, but it involves high-dimensional optimizations when the number of regressors is large. This paper proposes a computationally feasible variation on these standard two-step GMM estimators by applying the idea of continuous-updating to the autoregressive parameter only, given the fact that the absolute value of the autoregressive parameter is less than unity as a necessary requirement for the data-generating process to be stationary. We show that our subset-continuous-updating method does not alter the asymptotic distribution of the two-step GMM estimators, and it therefore retains consistency. Our simulation results indicate that the subset-continuous-updating GMM estimators outperform their standard two-step counterparts in finite samples in terms of the estimation accuracy on the autoregressive parameter and the size of the Sargan-Hansen test. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Generalized Information Matrix Tests for Detecting Model Misspecification
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 46; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040046 -
Abstract
Generalized Information Matrix Tests (GIMTs) have recently been used for detecting the presence of misspecification in regression models in both randomized controlled trials and observational studies. In this paper, a unified GIMT framework is developed for the purpose of identifying, classifying, and deriving
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Generalized Information Matrix Tests (GIMTs) have recently been used for detecting the presence of misspecification in regression models in both randomized controlled trials and observational studies. In this paper, a unified GIMT framework is developed for the purpose of identifying, classifying, and deriving novel model misspecification tests for finite-dimensional smooth probability models. These GIMTs include previously published as well as newly developed information matrix tests. To illustrate the application of the GIMT framework, we derived and assessed the performance of new GIMTs for binary logistic regression. Although all GIMTs exhibited good level and power performance for the larger sample sizes, GIMT statistics with fewer degrees of freedom and derived using log-likelihood third derivatives exhibited improved level and power performance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Testing Cross-Sectional Correlation in Large Panel Data Models with Serial Correlation
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 44; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040044 -
Abstract
This paper considers the problem of testing cross-sectional correlation in large panel data models with serially-correlated errors. It finds that existing tests for cross-sectional correlation encounter size distortions with serial correlation in the errors. To control the size, this paper proposes a modification
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This paper considers the problem of testing cross-sectional correlation in large panel data models with serially-correlated errors. It finds that existing tests for cross-sectional correlation encounter size distortions with serial correlation in the errors. To control the size, this paper proposes a modification of Pesaran’s Cross-sectional Dependence (CD) test to account for serial correlation of an unknown form in the error term. We derive the limiting distribution of this test as N,T. The test is distribution free and allows for unknown forms of serial correlation in the errors. Monte Carlo simulations show that the test has good size and power for large panels when serial correlation in the errors is present. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Panel Cointegration Testing in the Presence of Linear Time Trends
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 45; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040045 -
Abstract
We consider a class of panel tests of the null hypothesis of no cointegration and cointegration. All tests under investigation rely on single-equations estimated by least squares, and they may be residual-based or not. We focus on test statistics computed from regressions with
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We consider a class of panel tests of the null hypothesis of no cointegration and cointegration. All tests under investigation rely on single-equations estimated by least squares, and they may be residual-based or not. We focus on test statistics computed from regressions with intercept only (i.e., without detrending) and with at least one of the regressors (integrated of order 1) being dominated by a linear time trend. In such a setting, often encountered in practice, the limiting distributions and critical values provided for and applied with the situation “with intercept only” are not correct. It is demonstrated that their usage results in size distortions growing with the panel size N. Moreover, we show which are the appropriate distributions, and how correct critical values can be obtained from the literature. Full article
Open AccessReview
Pair-Copula Constructions for Financial Applications: A Review
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 43; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040043 -
Abstract
This survey reviews the large and growing literature on the use of pair-copula constructions (PCCs) in financial applications. Using a PCC, multivariate data that exhibit complex patterns of dependence can be modeled using bivariate copulae as simple building blocks. Hence, this model represents
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This survey reviews the large and growing literature on the use of pair-copula constructions (PCCs) in financial applications. Using a PCC, multivariate data that exhibit complex patterns of dependence can be modeled using bivariate copulae as simple building blocks. Hence, this model represents a very flexible way of constructing higher-dimensional copulae. In this paper, we survey inference methods and goodness-of-fit tests for such models, as well as empirical applications of the PCCs in finance and economics. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Oil Price and Economic Growth: A Long Story?
Econometrics 2016, 4(4), 41; doi:10.3390/econometrics4040041 -
Abstract
This study investigates changes in the relationship between oil prices and the US economy from a long-term perspective. Although neither of the two series (oil price and GDP growth rates) presents structural breaks in mean, we identify different volatility periods in both of
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This study investigates changes in the relationship between oil prices and the US economy from a long-term perspective. Although neither of the two series (oil price and GDP growth rates) presents structural breaks in mean, we identify different volatility periods in both of them, separately. From a multivariate perspective, we do not observe a significant effect between changes in oil prices and GDP growth when considering the full period. However, we find a significant relationship in some subperiods by carrying out a rolling analysis and by investigating the presence of structural breaks in the multivariate framework. Finally, we obtain evidence, by means of a time-varying VAR, that the impact of the oil price shock on GDP growth has declined over time. We also observe that the negative effect is greater at the time of large oil price increases, supporting previous evidence of nonlinearity in the relationship. Full article
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