Open AccessArticle
Stand-Off Chemical Detection Using Photoacoustic Sensing Techniques—From Single Element to Phase Array
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 6; doi:10.3390/chemosensors6010006 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Technologies that can detect harmful chemicals, such as explosive devices, harmful gas leaks, airborne chemicals or/and biological agents, are heavily invested in by the government to prevent any possible catastrophic consequences. Some key features of such technology are, but not limited to, effective
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Technologies that can detect harmful chemicals, such as explosive devices, harmful gas leaks, airborne chemicals or/and biological agents, are heavily invested in by the government to prevent any possible catastrophic consequences. Some key features of such technology are, but not limited to, effective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the detected signal and extended distance between the detector and target. In this work, we describe the development of photoacoustic sensing techniques from simple to more complex systems. These techniques include passive and active noise filters, parabolic sound reflectors, a lock-in amplifier, and beam-forming with an array of microphones; using these techniques, we increased detection distance from a few cm in an indoor setting to over 41 feet in an outdoor setting. We also establish a theoretical mathematical model that explains the underlying principle of how SNR can be improved with an increasing number of microphone elements in the phase array. We validate this model with computational simulations as well as experimental results. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering for Biofilm Characterization
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 5; doi:10.3390/chemosensors6010005 -
Abstract
Biofilms are a communal way of living for microorganisms in which microorganism cells are surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Most microorganisms can live in biofilm form. Since microorganisms are everywhere, understanding biofilm structure and composition is crucial for making the world a
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Biofilms are a communal way of living for microorganisms in which microorganism cells are surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Most microorganisms can live in biofilm form. Since microorganisms are everywhere, understanding biofilm structure and composition is crucial for making the world a better place to live, not only for humans but also for other living creatures. Raman spectroscopy is a nondestructive technique and provides fingerprint information about an analyte of interest. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is a form of this technique and provides enhanced scattering of the analyte that is in close vicinity of a nanostructured noble metal surface such as silver or gold. In this review, the applications of both techniques and their combination with other biofilm analysis techniques for characterization of composition and structure of biofilms are discussed. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Infra-Red Plasmonic Sensors
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 4; doi:10.3390/chemosensors6010004 -
Abstract
Plasmonic sensors exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles are common in the visual spectrum. However, bio-sensors near the infra-red (NIR) windows (600–900 nm and 1000–1400 nm) are of interest, as in these regions the absorption coefficients of water,
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Plasmonic sensors exploiting the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of noble metal nanoparticles are common in the visual spectrum. However, bio-sensors near the infra-red (NIR) windows (600–900 nm and 1000–1400 nm) are of interest, as in these regions the absorption coefficients of water, melanin deoxyglobin, and hemoglobin are all low. The first part of this paper reviews the work that has been undertaken using gold (Au) and silver (Ag) particles in metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) in the NIR. Despite this success, there are limitations, as there is only a narrow band in the visual and NIR where losses are low for traditional plasmonic materials. Further, noble metals are not compatible with standard silicon manufacturing processes, making it challenging to produce on-chip integrated plasmonic sensors with Au or Ag. Therefore, it is desirable to use different materials for plasmonic chemical and biological sensing, that are foundry-compatible with silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge). One material that has received significant attention is highly-doped Ge, which starts to exhibit metallic properties at a wavelength as short as 6 μm. This is discussed in the second part of the paper and the results of recent analysis are included. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effect of Dangling Bonds on De-Poling Time for Polymeric Electric Field Optical Sensors
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 3; doi:10.3390/chemosensors6010003 -
Abstract
This paper investigates the possible chemical changes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) caused by two different techniques of fabrication for ultra-sensitive electric field optical sensors. The sensing element is a micro-sphere made from 60:1 PDMS (60 parts base silicon elastomer to one part polymer curing
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This paper investigates the possible chemical changes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) caused by two different techniques of fabrication for ultra-sensitive electric field optical sensors. The sensing element is a micro-sphere made from 60:1 PDMS (60 parts base silicon elastomer to one part polymer curing agent by volume). The measurement principle is based on the morphology dependent resonances (MDR) shifts of the micro-sphere. We present the effects of curing and poling of polymer micro-spheres used as optical sensors. The degree of curing leads to changes in the de-poling time which results from dangling bonds in the polymeric chains. Consequently, the longevity of the sensitivity of the sensor can extended by two orders of magnitude. An analysis is carried out along with preliminary experiments to investigate that behavior. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Chemosensors in 2017
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 2; doi:10.3390/chemosensors6010002 -
Abstract
Peer review is an essential part in the publication process, ensuring that Chemosensors maintains high quality standards for its published papers. In 2017, a total of 32 papers were published in the journal.[...] Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Recent Advances in the Detection of Neurotransmitters
Chemosensors 2018, 6(1), 1; doi:10.3390/chemosensors6010001 -
Abstract
Neurotransmitters are chemicals that act as messengers in the synaptic transmission process. They are essential for human health and any imbalance in their activities can cause serious mental disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Hence, monitoring the concentrations of various
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Neurotransmitters are chemicals that act as messengers in the synaptic transmission process. They are essential for human health and any imbalance in their activities can cause serious mental disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Hence, monitoring the concentrations of various neurotransmitters is of great importance in studying and diagnosing such mental illnesses. Recently, many researchers have explored the use of unique materials for developing biosensors for both in vivo and ex vivo neurotransmitter detection. A combination of nanomaterials, polymers, and biomolecules were incorporated to implement such sensor devices. For in vivo detection, electrochemical sensing has been commonly applied, with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry being the most promising technique to date, due to the advantages such as easy miniaturization, simple device architecture, and high sensitivity. However, the main challenges for in vivo electrochemical neurotransmitter sensors are limited target selectivity, large background signal and noise, and device fouling and degradation over time. Therefore, achieving simultaneous detection of multiple neurotransmitters in real time with long-term stability remains the focus of research. The purpose of this review paper is to summarize the recently developed sensing techniques with the focus on neurotransmitters as the target analyte, and to discuss the outlook of simultaneous detection of multiple neurotransmitter species. This paper is organized as follows: firstly, the common materials used for developing neurotransmitter sensors are discussed. Secondly, several sensor surface modification approaches to enhance sensing performance are reviewed. Finally, we discuss recent developments in the simultaneous detection capability of multiple neurotransmitters. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Luminescent Metal Nanoclusters for Potential Chemosensor Applications
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 36; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040036 -
Abstract
Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs)-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm) M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display
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Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs)-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm) M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display absorption and emission properties via electronic transitions between energy levels upon interaction with light. As such, researchers tend to apply M-NCs in diverse fields, such as in chemosensors, biological imaging, catalysis, and environmental and electronic devices. Chemo- and bio-sensory uses have been extensively explored with luminescent NCs of Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt as potential sensory materials. Luminescent bi-metallic NCs, such as Au-Ag, Au-Cu, Au-Pd, and Au-Pt have also been used as probes in chemosensory investigations. Both metallic and bi-metallic NCs have been utilized to detect various analytes, such as metal ions, anions, biomolecules, proteins, acidity or alkalinity of a solution (pH), and nucleic acids, at diverse detection ranges and limits. In this review, we have summarized the chemosensory applications of luminescent M-NCs and bi-metallic NCs. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Towards Rational Chemosensor Design through Improved Understanding of Experimental Parameter Variation and Tolerance in Cyclodextrin-Promoted Fluorescence Detection
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 34; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040034 -
Abstract
We have previously developed a highly efficient fluorescence-based toxicant-detection method that operates in complex environments to detect aromatic toxicants and toxicant metabolites with high sensitivity and selectivity. This method relies on the ability of γ-cyclodextrin to act as a supramolecular scaffold, and uses
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We have previously developed a highly efficient fluorescence-based toxicant-detection method that operates in complex environments to detect aromatic toxicants and toxicant metabolites with high sensitivity and selectivity. This method relies on the ability of γ-cyclodextrin to act as a supramolecular scaffold, and uses a variety of non-covalent interactions between the cyclodextrin, toxicant, and fluorophore to enable efficient detection. Reported herein is an investigation of the effect of various experimental parameters, including host concentration, temperature, pH, salt, and solvent, on the observed energy-transfer efficiencies. These results advance our understanding of γ-cyclodextrin-based association complexes and provide crucial information for the development of fluorescence-based sensors using such complexation and the resultant fluorescence-based detection. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Biochars as Innovative Humidity Sensing Materials
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 35; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040035 -
Abstract
In this work, biochar-based humidity sensors were prepared by drop-coating technique. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was added as an organic binder to improve the adhesion of the sensing material onto ceramic substrates having platinum electrodes. Two biochars obtained from different precursors were used. The sensors
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In this work, biochar-based humidity sensors were prepared by drop-coating technique. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was added as an organic binder to improve the adhesion of the sensing material onto ceramic substrates having platinum electrodes. Two biochars obtained from different precursors were used. The sensors were tested toward relative humidity (RH) at room temperature and showed a response starting around 5 RH%, varying the impedance of 2 orders of magnitude after exposure to almost 100% relative humidity. In both cases, biochar materials are behaving as p-type semiconductors under low amounts of humidity. On the contrary, for higher RH values, the impedance decreased due to water molecules adsorption. When PVP is added to SWP700 biochar, n-p heterojunctions are formed between the two semiconductors, leading to a higher sensitivity at low RH values for the sensors SWP700-10% PVP and SWP700-20% PVP with respect to pure SWP700 sensor. Finally, response and recovery times were both reasonably fast (in the order of 1 min). Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Challenges in Developing a Biochip for Intact Histamine Using Commercial Antibodies
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 33; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040033 -
Abstract
This study describes the development and the challenges in the development of an on-chip immunoassay for histamine using commercially available antibodies. Histamine can be used as an indicator of food freshness and quality, but it is also a relevant marker in clinical diagnostics.
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This study describes the development and the challenges in the development of an on-chip immunoassay for histamine using commercially available antibodies. Histamine can be used as an indicator of food freshness and quality, but it is also a relevant marker in clinical diagnostics. Due to its low molecular weight, simple structure and thus low immunogenicity production of high specificity and affinity antibodies is difficult. From six commercial anti-histamine antibodies tested, only two bound the histamine free in the solution. A fluorescent on-chip immunoassay for histamine was established with a dynamic range of 8–111 µg/mL using polyclonal anti-histamine antibody H7403 from Sigma (Mendota Heights, MN, USA). The anti-histamine antibodies described and used in published literature are thoroughly reviewed and the quality of commercial antibodies and their traceability and quality issues are highlighted and extensively discussed. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Illuminating Brain Activities with Fluorescent Protein-Based Biosensors
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 32; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040032 -
Abstract
Fluorescent protein-based biosensors are indispensable molecular tools for life science research. The invention and development of high-fidelity biosensors for a particular molecule or molecular event often catalyze important scientific breakthroughs. Understanding the structural and functional organization of brain activities remain a subject for
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Fluorescent protein-based biosensors are indispensable molecular tools for life science research. The invention and development of high-fidelity biosensors for a particular molecule or molecular event often catalyze important scientific breakthroughs. Understanding the structural and functional organization of brain activities remain a subject for which optical sensors are in desperate need and of growing interest. Here, we review genetically encoded fluorescent sensors for imaging neuronal activities with a focus on the design principles and optimizations of various sensors. New bioluminescent sensors useful for deep-tissue imaging are also discussed. By highlighting the protein engineering efforts and experimental applications of these sensors, we can consequently analyze factors influencing their performance. Finally, we remark on how future developments can fill technological gaps and lead to new discoveries. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Polymeric Materials for Printed-Based Electroanalytical (Bio)Applications
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 31; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040031 -
Abstract
Advances in design of selective interfaces and printed technology have mighty contributed to the expansion of the electroanalysis fame. The real advantage in electroanalytical field is the possibility to manufacture and customize plenty of different sensing platforms, thus avoiding expensive equipment, hiring skilled
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Advances in design of selective interfaces and printed technology have mighty contributed to the expansion of the electroanalysis fame. The real advantage in electroanalytical field is the possibility to manufacture and customize plenty of different sensing platforms, thus avoiding expensive equipment, hiring skilled personnel, and expending economic effort. Growing developments in polymer science have led to further improvements in electroanalytical methods such as sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility, and accuracy. This review provides an overview of the technical procedures that are used in order to establish polymer effectiveness in printed-based electroanalytical methods. Particular emphasis is placed on the development of electronalytical sensors and biosensors, which highlights the diverse role of the polymeric materials depending on their specific application. A wide overview is provided, taking into account the most significant findings that have been reported from 2010 to 2017. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Microdevices for Non-Invasive Detection of Bladder Cancer
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 30; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040030 -
Abstract
Bladder cancer holds the record for the highest lifetime cost on a per-patient basis. This is due to high recurrence rates, which necessitate invasive and costly long-term evaluation methods such as cystoscopy and imaging. Microfluidics is emerging as an important approach to contribute
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Bladder cancer holds the record for the highest lifetime cost on a per-patient basis. This is due to high recurrence rates, which necessitate invasive and costly long-term evaluation methods such as cystoscopy and imaging. Microfluidics is emerging as an important approach to contribute to initial diagnosis and follow-up, by enabling the precise manipulation of biological samples. Specifically, microdevices have been used for the isolation of cells or genetic material from blood samples, sparking significant interest as a versatile platform for non-invasive bladder cancer detection with voided urine. In this review, we revisit the methods of bladder cancer detection and describe various types of markers currently used for evaluation. We detail cutting-edge technologies and evaluate their merits in the detection, screening, and diagnosis of bladder cancer. Advantages of microscale devices over standard methods of detection, as well as their limitations, are provided. We conclude with a discussion of criteria for guiding microdevice development that could deepen our understanding of prognoses at the level of individual patients and the underlying biology of bladder cancer development. Collectively, the development and widespread application of improved microfluidic devices for bladder cancer could drive treatment breakthroughs and establish widespread, tangible outcomes on patients’ long-term survival. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Novel 2D-Inorganic Materials for Gas Sensing
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 29; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040029 -
Abstract
Nowadays, modern technology is demanding more efficient gas sensors for advanced applications [1].[...] Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Possibilities and Challenges for Quantitative Optical Sensing of Hydrogen Peroxide
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 28; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040028 -
Abstract
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays a key role in many biological processes spanning from coral bleaching, over cell signaling to aging. However, exact quantitative assessments of concentrations and dynamics of H2O2 remain challenging due to methodological limitations—especially
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Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plays a key role in many biological processes spanning from coral bleaching, over cell signaling to aging. However, exact quantitative assessments of concentrations and dynamics of H2O2 remain challenging due to methodological limitations—especially at very low (sub μM) concentrations. Most published optical detection schemes for H2O2 suffer from irreversibility, cross sensitivity to other analytes such as other reactive oxygen species (ROS) or pH, instability, temperature dependency or limitation to a specific medium. We review optical detection schemes for H2O2, compare their specific advantages and disadvantages, and discuss current challenges and new approaches for quantitative optical H2O2 detection, with a special focus on luminescence-based measurements. We also review published concentration ranges for H2O2 in natural habitats, and physiological concentrations in different biological samples to provide guidelines for future experiments and sensor development in biomedical and environmental science. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Oxygen Sensing by the Hybrid Langmuir-Blodgett Films of Iridium(III) Complexes and Synthetic Saponite on the Basis of Energy Transfer
Chemosensors 2017, 5(4), 27; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5040027 -
Abstract
An ultra-thin hybrid film of amphiphilic iridium(III) complexes and synthetic saponite was manipulated by means of the modified Langmuir-Blodgett method. In the film deposited onto a quartz substrate, the external mixed molecular layer of amphiphilic iridium(III) complexes was reinforced by the inner layer
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An ultra-thin hybrid film of amphiphilic iridium(III) complexes and synthetic saponite was manipulated by means of the modified Langmuir-Blodgett method. In the film deposited onto a quartz substrate, the external mixed molecular layer of amphiphilic iridium(III) complexes was reinforced by the inner layer of exfoliated synthetic saponite. As components of the molecular layer, two iridium(III) complexes were used: [Ir(dfppy)2(dc9bpy)]+ (dfppyH = 2-(4′,6′-difluorophenyl) pyridine; dc9bpy = 4,4′-dinonyl-2,2′-bipyridine) (denoted as DFPPY) and [Ir(piq)2(dc9bpy)]+ (piqH = 1-phenyisoquinoline)) denoted as PIQ). The emission spectra from the films changed from blue to red maxima with the decrease of a ratio of DFPPY/PIQ due to the energy transfer from excited DFPPY to PIQ. The intensity of red decreased with the increase of oxygen pressure through the quenching of excited iridium(III) complexes, promising a possibility as an oxygen-sensing film. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Fluorescence Chemosensory Determination of Cu2+ Using a New Rhodamine–Morpholine Conjugate
Chemosensors 2017, 5(3), 26; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5030026 -
Abstract
A new rhodamine-B carbonyl-morpholine derivative (denoted as RECM) was prepared by a two-step synthesis procedure. The employed method allowed a lactam ring development of rhodamine-B and ethylenediamine to demonstrate a facile amide bond formation. The obtained RECM was confirmed by 1H NMR,
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A new rhodamine-B carbonyl-morpholine derivative (denoted as RECM) was prepared by a two-step synthesis procedure. The employed method allowed a lactam ring development of rhodamine-B and ethylenediamine to demonstrate a facile amide bond formation. The obtained RECM was confirmed by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and mass spectrometry analysis. RECM was formed to detect copper ion (Cu2+) due to its problematic toxicity features in aquatic ecosystems. It showed a high selectivity toward Cu2+ in comparison with some environmentally relevant alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metal cations at 50 µM in acetonitrile. Moreover, non-fluorescent RECM showed fluorescence intensity and UV-Vis absorbance increases in the presence of Cu2+ with high linear dependent coefficients (R2 = 0.964 and R2 = 0.982 respectively) as well as a color change from colorless to pink owing to the ring opening of the rhodamine spirolactam form. Binding capability experiments presented a clear 1:1 stoichiometry of RECM–Cu2+ complex with the binding constant (Ka) as 2.25 × 104 M−1. The calculation of limits of detection (LOD) was 0.21 µM based on the linear regression method, which is below the maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) value of Cu2+ (1.3 ppm equals to 20.46 µM) in drinking water. These characteristics make the RECM a promising candidate for the real-time detection of toxic Cu2+ in environmental monitoring applications. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Voltammetric Determination of Anti-Hypertensive Drug Hydrochlorothiazide Using Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified with L-Glutamic Acid
Chemosensors 2017, 5(3), 25; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5030025 -
Abstract
This work deals with the development of screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with L-glutamic acid via two different approaches: electropolymerization (SPCE/PGA) and aryl diazonium electrochemical grafting (SPCE/EGA). SPCE/PGA and SPCE/EGA were analytically compared in the determination of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) by differential pulse voltammetry. Both
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This work deals with the development of screen-printed carbon electrodes modified with L-glutamic acid via two different approaches: electropolymerization (SPCE/PGA) and aryl diazonium electrochemical grafting (SPCE/EGA). SPCE/PGA and SPCE/EGA were analytically compared in the determination of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) by differential pulse voltammetry. Both electrochemical characterization and analytical performance indicate that SPCE/EGA is a much better sensor for HCTZ. The detection and quantification limits were at the level of μmol L−1 with a very good linearity in the studied concentration range. In addition, the proposed SPCE/EGA was successfully applied for the determination of HCTZ in an anti-hypertensive drug with high reproducibility and good trueness. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Low-Frequency Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy as a Monitoring Tool for Yeast Growth in Industrial Brewing Processes
Chemosensors 2017, 5(3), 24; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5030024 -
Abstract
Today’s yeast total biomass and viability measurements during the brewing process are dependent on offline methods such as methylene blue or florescence dye-based staining, and/or the usage of flow cytometric measurements. Additionally, microscopic cell counting methods decelerate an easy and quick prediction of
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Today’s yeast total biomass and viability measurements during the brewing process are dependent on offline methods such as methylene blue or florescence dye-based staining, and/or the usage of flow cytometric measurements. Additionally, microscopic cell counting methods decelerate an easy and quick prediction of yeast viability. These processes are time consuming and result in a time-delayed response signal, which not only reduces the knowledge of the performance of the yeast itself, but also impacts the quality of the final product. Novel approaches in process monitoring during the aerobic and anaerobic fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are not only limited to classical pH, dO2 and off-gas analysis, but they also use different in situ and online sensors based on different physical principles to determine the biomass, product quality and cell death. Within this contribution, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to monitor the biomass produced in aerobic and anaerobic batch cultivation approaches, simulating the propagation and fermentation unit operation of industrial brewing processes. Increases in the double-layer capacitance (CDL), determined at frequencies below 1 kHz, were proportional to the increase of biomass in the batch, which was monitored in the online and inline mode. A good correlation of CDL with the cell density was found. In order to prove the robustness and flexibility of this novel method, different state-of-the-art biomass measurements (dry cell weight—DCW and optical density—OD) were performed for comparison. Because measurements in this frequency range are largely determined by the double-layer region between the electrode and media, rather minor interferences with process parameters (aeration and stirring) were to be expected. It is shown that impedance spectroscopy at low frequencies is not only a powerful tool for the monitoring of viable yeast cell concentrations during operation, but it is also perfectly suited to determining physiological states of the cells, and may facilitate biomass monitoring in the brewing and yeast-propagating industry drastically. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Thin 2D: The New Dimensionality in Gas Sensing
Chemosensors 2017, 5(3), 21; doi:10.3390/chemosensors5030021 -
Abstract
Since the first report of graphene, thin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with atomic or molecular thicknesses have attracted great research interest for gas sensing applications. This was due to the distinctive physical, chemical, and electronic properties related to their ultrathin thickness, which positively affect
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Since the first report of graphene, thin two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials with atomic or molecular thicknesses have attracted great research interest for gas sensing applications. This was due to the distinctive physical, chemical, and electronic properties related to their ultrathin thickness, which positively affect the gas sensing performances. This feature article discusses the latest developments in this field, focusing on the properties, preparation, and sensing applications of thin 2D inorganic nanomaterials such as single- or few-layer layered double hydroxides/transition metal oxides/transition metal dichalcogenides. Recent studies have shown that thin 2D inorganic nanomaterials could provide monitoring of harmful/toxic gases with high sensitivity and a low concentration detection limit by means of conductometric sensors operating at relatively low working temperatures. Promisingly, by using these thin 2D inorganic nanomaterials, it may open a simple way of improving the sensing capabilities of conductometric gas sensors. Full article
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