Open AccessArticle
Ultrasensitive Determination of Malathion Using Acetylcholinesterase Immobilized on Chitosan-Functionalized Magnetic Iron Nanoparticles
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 16; doi:10.3390/bios8010016 -
Abstract
A renewable, disposable, low cost, and sensitive sensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides was constructed by immobilizing the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE), via glutaraldehyde, on magnetic iron nanoparticles (Fe3O4) previously synthesized and functionalized with chitosan (CS). The sensor was
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A renewable, disposable, low cost, and sensitive sensor for the detection of organophosphorus pesticides was constructed by immobilizing the acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE), via glutaraldehyde, on magnetic iron nanoparticles (Fe3O4) previously synthesized and functionalized with chitosan (CS). The sensor was denoted AChE/CS/Fe3O4. The magnetic nanoparticles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Acetylthiocholine (ATCh) was incubated with AChE/CS/Fe3O4 and attached to a screen-printed electrode using a magnet. The oxidation of thiocholine (from ATCh hydrolysis) was monitored at an applied potential of +0.5 V vs. Ag/AgCl(KClsat) in 0.1 mol L−1 phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.5) as the supporting electrolyte. A mixture of the pesticide malathion and ATCh was investigated using the same procedure, and the results were compared and expressed as inhibition percentages. For determination of malathion, the proposed sensor presented a linear response in the range from 0.5 to 20 nmol L−1 (R = 0.9942). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were 0.3 and 0.8 nmol L−1, respectively. Real samples were also investigated, with recovery values of 96.0% and 108.3% obtained for tomato and pond water samples, respectively. The proposed sensor is a feasible option for malathion detection, offering a linear response, good sensitivity, and a low detection limit. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Probing Contaminant-Induced Alterations in Chlorophyll Fluorescence by AC-Dielectrophoresis-Based 2D-Algal Array
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 15; doi:10.3390/bios8010015 -
Abstract
The investigation of contaminant impact on algae requires rapid and reliable cell collection and optical detection. The capability of alternative current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) collection of whole cell arrays with combined fluorescence microscopy detection to follow the alterations of chlorophyll fluorescence during environmental
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The investigation of contaminant impact on algae requires rapid and reliable cell collection and optical detection. The capability of alternative current (AC) dielectrophoresis (DEP) collection of whole cell arrays with combined fluorescence microscopy detection to follow the alterations of chlorophyll fluorescence during environmental contaminant exposure was explored. The application of an AC-field of 100 V cm−1, 100 Hz for 30 min to capture and immobilize the cells of green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in two-dimensional (2D) arrays does not induce changes in chlorophyll fluorescence. The results demonstrate that DEP-based 2D-arrays allow non-invasive detection of chlorophyll fluorescence change upon exposure to high concentrations of copper oxide nanoparticles and ionic copper. These results were in agreement with data obtained by flow cytometry used as a comparative method. The tool was also applied to follow the effect of a number of ubiquitous contaminants such as inorganic mercury, methylmercury, and diuron. However, a statistically significant short-term effect was observed only for mercury. Overall, DEP-based 2D-arrays of algal cells with fluorescence detection appear to be suitable for stain-free probing the effects on the photosynthetic microorganisms in highly polluted environment. Full article
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Open AccessCommunication
Self-Organized Nanostructure Modified Microelectrode for Sensitive Electrochemical Glutamate Detection in Stem Cells-Derived Brain Organoids
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 14; doi:10.3390/bios8010014 -
Abstract
Neurons release neurotransmitters such as glutamate to communicate with each other and to coordinate brain functioning. As increased glutamate release is indicative of neuronal maturation and activity, a system that can measure glutamate levels over time within the same tissue and/or culture system
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Neurons release neurotransmitters such as glutamate to communicate with each other and to coordinate brain functioning. As increased glutamate release is indicative of neuronal maturation and activity, a system that can measure glutamate levels over time within the same tissue and/or culture system is highly advantageous for neurodevelopmental investigation. To address such challenges, we develop for the first time a convenient method to realize functionalized borosilicate glass capillaries with nanostructured texture as an electrochemical biosensor to detect glutamate release from cerebral organoids generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) that mimic various brain regions. The biosensor shows a clear catalytic activity toward the oxidation of glutamate with a sensitivity of 93 ± 9.5 nA·µM−1·cm−2. It was found that the enzyme-modified microelectrodes can detect glutamate in a wide linear range from 5 µM to 0.5 mM with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 5.6 ± 0.2 µM. Measurements were performed within the organoids at different time points and consistent results were obtained. This data demonstrates the reliability of the biosensor as well as its usefulness in measuring glutamate levels across time within the same culture system. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Prolonged Corrosion Stability of a Microchip Sensor Implant during In Vivo Exposure
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 13; doi:10.3390/bios8010013 -
Abstract
A microelectronic biosensor was subjected to in vivo exposure by implanting it in the vicinity of m. trapezii (Trapezius muscle) from cattle. The implant is intended for the continuous monitoring of glucose levels, and the study aimed at evaluating the biostability of exposed
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A microelectronic biosensor was subjected to in vivo exposure by implanting it in the vicinity of m. trapezii (Trapezius muscle) from cattle. The implant is intended for the continuous monitoring of glucose levels, and the study aimed at evaluating the biostability of exposed semiconductor surfaces. The sensor chip was a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) prepared using 0.25 µm complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor CMOS/BiCMOS technology. Sensing is based on the principle of affinity viscometry with a sensoric assay, which is separated by a semipermeable membrane from the tissue. Outer dimensions of the otherwise hermetically sealed biosensor system were 39 × 49 × 16 mm. The test system was implanted into cattle in a subcutaneous position without running it. After 17 months, the device was explanted and analyzed by comparing it with unexposed chips and systems. Investigations focused on the MEMS chip using SEM, TEM, and elemental analysis by EDX mapping. The sensor chip turned out to be uncorroded and no diminishing of the topmost passivation layer could be determined, which contrasts remarkably with previous results on CMOS biosensors. The negligible corrosive attack is understood to be a side effect of the semipermeable membrane separating the assay from the tissue. It is concluded that the separation has enabled a prolonged biostability of the chip, which will be of relevance for biosensor implants in general. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Glucose Sensing Using Capacitive Biosensor Based on Polyvinylidene Fluoride Thin Film
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 12; doi:10.3390/bios8010012 -
Abstract
A polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film-based capacitive biosensor was developed for glucose sensing. This device consists of a PVDF film sandwiched between two electrodes. A capacitive biosensor measures the dielectric properties of the dielectric layers at the interface between the electrolyte and the electrode.
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A polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film-based capacitive biosensor was developed for glucose sensing. This device consists of a PVDF film sandwiched between two electrodes. A capacitive biosensor measures the dielectric properties of the dielectric layers at the interface between the electrolyte and the electrode. A glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme was immobilized onto the electrode to oxidize glucose. In practice, the biochemical reaction of glucose with the GOx enzyme generates free electron carriers. Consequently, the potential difference between the electrodes is increased, resulting in a measurable voltage output of the biosensor. The device was tested for various glucose concentrations in the range of 0.013 to 5.85 M, and various GOx enzyme concentrations between 4882.8 and 2.5 million units/L. We found that the sensor output increased with increasing glucose concentration up to 5.85 M. These results indicate that the PVDF film-based capacitive biosensors can be properly applied to glucose sensing and provide opportunities for the low-cost fabrication of glucose-based biosensors based on PVDF materials. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Enzymatic Fuel Cells: Towards Self-Powered Implantable and Wearable Diagnostics
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 11; doi:10.3390/bios8010011 -
Abstract
With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the
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With the rapid progress in nanotechnology and microengineering, point-of-care and personalised healthcare, based on wearable and implantable diagnostics, is becoming a reality. Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) hold great potential as a sustainable means to power such devices by using physiological fluids as the fuel. This review summarises the fundamental operation of EFCs and discusses the most recent advances for their use as implantable and wearable self-powered sensors. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Regenerative, Highly-Sensitive, Non-Enzymatic Dopamine Sensor and Impact of Different Buffer Systems in Dopamine Sensing
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 9; doi:10.3390/bios8010009 -
Abstract
Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are used extensively in ultra-sensitive biomolecule sensing applications. Along with high sensitivity, the possibility of regeneration is highly desired in bio-sensors. An important constituent of such bio-sensing systems is the buffer used to maintain pH and provide an ionic
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Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are used extensively in ultra-sensitive biomolecule sensing applications. Along with high sensitivity, the possibility of regeneration is highly desired in bio-sensors. An important constituent of such bio-sensing systems is the buffer used to maintain pH and provide an ionic conducting medium, among its other properties. In this work, we demonstrate highly-sensitive regenerative dopamine sensors and the impact of varying buffer composition and type on the electrolyte gated field effect sensors. The role of the buffer system is an often ignored condition in the electrical characterization of sensors. Non-enzymatic dopamine sensors are fabricated and regenerated in hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. The sensors are finally measured against four different buffer solutions. The impact of the nature and chemical structure of buffer molecules on the dopamine sensors is shown, and the appropriate buffer systems are demonstrated. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Investigating Colorimetric Protein Array Assay Schemes for Detection of Recurrence of Bladder Cancer
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 10; doi:10.3390/bios8010010 -
Abstract
A colorimetric microarray for the multiplexed detection of recurrence of bladder cancer including protein markers interleukin-8 (IL8), decorin (DCN), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was established to enable easy and cheap read-out by a simple office scanner paving the way for quick
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A colorimetric microarray for the multiplexed detection of recurrence of bladder cancer including protein markers interleukin-8 (IL8), decorin (DCN), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was established to enable easy and cheap read-out by a simple office scanner paving the way for quick therapy monitoring at doctors’ offices. The chip is based on the principle of a sandwich immunoassay and was optimized prior to multiplexing using IL8 as a model marker. Six different colorimetric assay formats were evaluated using a detection antibody (dAB) labeled with (I) gold (Au) nanoparticles (NPs), (II) carbon NPs, (III) oxidized carbon NPs, and a biotinylated dAB in combination with (IV) neutravidin–carbon, (V) streptavidin (strp)–gold, and (VI) strp–horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Assay Format (III) worked best for NP-based detection and showed a low background while the enzymatic approach, using 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) substrate, led to the most intense signals with good reproducibility. Both assay formats showed consistent spot morphology as well as detection limits lower than 15 ng/L IL8 and were thus applied for the multiplexed detection of IL8, DCN, and VEGF in synthetic urine. Colorimetric detection in urine (1:3) yields reaction signals and measurement ranges well comparable with detection in the assay buffer, as well as excellent data reproducibility as indicated by the coefficient of variation (CV 5–9%). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Antibody Biomimetic Material Made of Pyrrole for CA 15-3 and Its Application as Sensing Material in Ion-Selective Electrodes for Potentiometric Detection
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 8; doi:10.3390/bios8010008 -
Abstract
This work reports a very simple approach for creating a synthetic antibody against any protein of interest and its application in potentiometric transduction. The selected protein was Breast Cancer Antigen (CA 15-3), which is implicated in breast cancer disease and used to follow-up
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This work reports a very simple approach for creating a synthetic antibody against any protein of interest and its application in potentiometric transduction. The selected protein was Breast Cancer Antigen (CA 15-3), which is implicated in breast cancer disease and used to follow-up breast cancer patients during treatment. The new material with antibody-like properties was obtained by molecular-imprinting technology, prepared by electropolymerizing pyrrol (Py, 5.0 × 10−3 mol/L) around Breast Cancer Antigen (CA 15-3) (100 U/mL) on a fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) conductive glass support. Cyclic voltammetry was employed for this purpose. All solutions were prepared in 4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) buffer, of pH 6.5. The biomarker was removed from the imprinted sites by chemical action of ethanol. The biomimetic material was then included in poly vinyl chloride (PVC) plasticized membranes to act as potentiometric ionophore, having or not a lipophilic ionic additive added. The corresponding selective electrodes were evaluated by calibration curves (in buffer and in synthetic serum) and by selectivity testing. The best analytical performance was obtained by selective electrodes including the plastic antibody and no lipophilic additive. The average limits of detection were 1.07 U/mL of CA 15-3, with a linear response from 1.44 to 13.2 U/mL and a cationic slope of 44.5 mV/decade. Overall, the lipophilic additives yielded no advantage to the overall potentiometric performance. The application of the MIP-based electrodes to the analysis of spiked synthetic serum showed precise and accurate results. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Low-Cost Inkjet-Printed Aptamer-Based Electrochemical Biosensor for the Selective Detection of Lysozyme
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 7; doi:10.3390/bios8010007 -
Abstract
Recently, inkjet-printing has gained increased popularity in applications such as flexible electronics and disposable sensors, as well as in wearable sensors because of its multifarious advantages. This work presents a novel, low-cost immobilization technique using inkjet-printing for the development of an aptamer-based biosensor
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Recently, inkjet-printing has gained increased popularity in applications such as flexible electronics and disposable sensors, as well as in wearable sensors because of its multifarious advantages. This work presents a novel, low-cost immobilization technique using inkjet-printing for the development of an aptamer-based biosensor for the detection of lysozyme, an important biomarker in various disease diagnosis. The strong affinity between the carbon nanotube (CNT) and the single-stranded DNA is exploited to immobilize the aptamers onto the working electrode by printing the ink containing the dispersion of CNT-aptamer complex. The inkjet-printing method enables aptamer density control, as well as high resolution patternability. Our developed sensor shows a detection limit of 90 ng/mL with high target selectivity against other proteins. The sensor also demonstrates a shelf-life for a reasonable period. This technology has potential for applications in developing low-cost point-of-care diagnostic testing kits for home healthcare. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Acknowledgement to Reviewers of Biosensors in 2017
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 5; doi:10.3390/bios8010005 -
Abstract
Peer review is an essential part in the publication process, ensuring that Biosensors maintains high quality standards for its published papers.[...] Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Mining the Potential of Label-Free Biosensors for In Vitro Antipsychotic Drug Screening
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 6; doi:10.3390/bios8010006 -
Abstract
The pharmaceutical industry is facing enormous challenges due to high drug attribution rates. For the past decades, novel methods have been developed for safety and efficacy testing, as well as for improving early development stages. In vitro screening methods for drug-receptor binding are
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The pharmaceutical industry is facing enormous challenges due to high drug attribution rates. For the past decades, novel methods have been developed for safety and efficacy testing, as well as for improving early development stages. In vitro screening methods for drug-receptor binding are considered to be good alternatives for decreasing costs in the identification of drug candidates. However, these methods require lengthy and troublesome labeling steps. Biosensors hold great promise due to the fact that label-free detection schemes can be designed in an easy and low-cost manner. In this paper, for the first time in the literature, we aimed to compare the potential of label-free optical and impedimetric electrochemical biosensors for the screening of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) based on their binding properties to dopamine receptors. Particularly, we have chosen a currently-used atypical antipsychotic drug (Buspirone) for investigating its dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) binding properties using an impedimetric biosensor and a nanoplasmonic biosensor. Both biosensors have been specifically functionalized and characterized for achieving a highly-sensitive and reliable analysis of drug-D3R binding. Our biosensor strategies allow for comparing different affinities against the D3R, which facilitates the identification of strong or weak dopamine antagonists via in vitro assays. This work demonstrates the unique potential of label-free biosensors for the implementation of cost-efficient and simpler analytical tools for the screening of antipsychotic drugs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Cuprous Oxide Thin Film Non-Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry and Other Voltammetry Methods and a Comparison to Different Thin Film Electrodes on the Detection of Glucose in an Alkaline Solution
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 4; doi:10.3390/bios8010004 -
Abstract
A cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin layer served as the base for a non-enzymatic glucose sensor in an alkaline medium, 0.1 NaOH solution, with a linear range of 50–200 mg/dL using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study
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A cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin layer served as the base for a non-enzymatic glucose sensor in an alkaline medium, 0.1 NaOH solution, with a linear range of 50–200 mg/dL using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) measurement. An X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study confirmed the formation of the cuprous oxide layer on the thin gold film sensor prototype. Quantitative detection of glucose in both phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and undiluted human serum was carried out. Neither ascorbic acid nor uric acid, even at a relatively high concentration level (100 mg/dL in serum), interfered with the glucose detection, demonstrating the excellent selectivity of this non-enzymatic cuprous oxide thin layer-based glucose sensor. Chronoamperometry and single potential amperometric voltammetry were used to verify the measurements obtained by DPV, and the positive results validated that the detection of glucose in a 0.1 M NaOH alkaline medium by DPV measurement was effective. Nickel, platinum, and copper are commonly used metals for non-enzymatic glucose detection. The performance of these metal-based sensors for glucose detection using DPV were also evaluated. The cuprous oxide (Cu2O) thin layer-based sensor showed the best sensitivity for glucose detection among the sensors evaluated. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Electronic Tongue—A Tool for All Tastes?
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 3; doi:10.3390/bios8010003 -
Abstract
Electronic tongue systems are traditionally used to analyse: food products, water samples and taste masking technologies for pharmaceuticals. In principle, their applications are almost limitless, as they are able to almost completely reduce the impact of interferents and can be applied to distinguish
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Electronic tongue systems are traditionally used to analyse: food products, water samples and taste masking technologies for pharmaceuticals. In principle, their applications are almost limitless, as they are able to almost completely reduce the impact of interferents and can be applied to distinguish samples of extreme complexity as for example broths from different stages of fermentation. Nevertheless, their applications outside the three principal sample types are, in comparison, rather scarce. In this review, we would like to take a closer look on what are real capabilities of electronic tongue systems, what can be achieved using mixed sensor arrays and by introduction of biosensors or molecularly imprinted polymers in the matrix. We will discuss future directions both in the sense of applications as well as system development in the ever-growing trend of low cost analysis. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An FT-Raman, FT-IR, and Quantum Chemical Investigation of Stanozolol and Oxandrolone
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 2; doi:10.3390/bios8010002 -
Abstract
We have studied the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and the Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of stanozolol and oxandrolone, and we have performed quantum chemical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) with a B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level of theory. The FT-IR
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We have studied the Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and the Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of stanozolol and oxandrolone, and we have performed quantum chemical calculations based on the density functional theory (DFT) with a B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level of theory. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were collected in a solid phase. The consistency between the calculated and experimental FT-IR and FT-Raman data indicates that the B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) can generate reliable geometry and related properties of the title compounds. Selected experimental bands were assigned and characterized on the basis of the scaled theoretical wavenumbers by their total energy distribution. The good agreement between the experimental and theoretical spectra allowed positive assignment of the observed vibrational absorption bands. Finally, the calculation results were applied to simulate the Raman and IR spectra of the title compounds, which show agreement with the observed spectra. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Label-Free Biosensor Detection of Endocrine Disrupting Compounds Using Engineered Estrogen Receptors
Biosensors 2018, 8(1), 1; doi:10.3390/bios8010001 -
Abstract
Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) are chemical substances shown to interfere with endogenous hormones affecting the endocrine, immune and nervous systems of mammals. EDCs are the causative agents of diseases including reproductive disorders and cancers. This highlights the urgency to develop fast and sensitive
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Endocrine Disrupting Compounds (EDCs) are chemical substances shown to interfere with endogenous hormones affecting the endocrine, immune and nervous systems of mammals. EDCs are the causative agents of diseases including reproductive disorders and cancers. This highlights the urgency to develop fast and sensitive methods to detect EDCs, which are detrimental even at very low concentrations. In this work, we propose a label-free surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method to detect specific EDCs (17 β-estradiol (E2), ethinyl-estradiol, 4-nonylphenol, tamoxifen) through their binding to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). We show that the use of rationally designed ERα (as bio-recognition element) in combination with conformation-sensitive peptides (as amplification agent, resulting in increased responses) enables the detection of low parts per billion (ppb) levels of E2. As a proof of concept, this bioassay was used to detect E2 in (spiked) real water samples from fish farms, rivers and the sea at low ppb levels after concentration by solid phase extraction. In addition, the present SPR assay that combines a conformation-sensitive peptide with an array of ERα mutants is very promising for the assessment of the risk of potential estrogenic activity for chemical substances. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Fluorescence-Free Biosensor Methods in Detection of Food Pathogens with a Special Focus on Listeria monocytogenes
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 63; doi:10.3390/bios7040063 -
Abstract
Food pathogens contaminate food products that allow their growth on the shelf and also under refrigerated conditions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to lower the limit of detection (LOD) of the method used and to obtain the results within hours to few
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Food pathogens contaminate food products that allow their growth on the shelf and also under refrigerated conditions. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to lower the limit of detection (LOD) of the method used and to obtain the results within hours to few days. Biosensor methods exploit the available technologies to individuate and provide an approximate quantification of the bacteria present in a sample. The main bottleneck of these methods depends on the aspecific binding to the surfaces and on a change in sensitivity when bacteria are in a complex food matrix with respect to bacteria in a liquid food sample. In this review, we introduce surface plasmon resonance (SPR), new advancements in SPR techniques, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), as fluorescence-free biosensing technologies for detection of L. monocytogenes in foods. The application of the two methods has facilitated L. monocytogenes detection with LOD of 1 log CFU/mL. Further advancements are envisaged through the combination of biosensor methods with immunoseparation of bacteria from larger volumes, application of lab-on-chip technologies, and EIS sensing methods for multiplex pathogen detection. Validation efforts are being conducted to demonstrate the robustness of detection, reproducibility and variability in multi-site installations. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial
Point-of-Care Diagnostics: Recent Advances and Trends
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 62; doi:10.3390/bios7040062 -
Abstract
Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in point-of-care diagnostics (POCD), which are a result of continuous developments in biosensors, microfluidic, bioanalytical platforms, assay formats, lab-on-a-chip technologies, and complementary technologies. This special issue targets the critical advances in POCD and provides guided insights and
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Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in point-of-care diagnostics (POCD), which are a result of continuous developments in biosensors, microfluidic, bioanalytical platforms, assay formats, lab-on-a-chip technologies, and complementary technologies. This special issue targets the critical advances in POCD and provides guided insights and directions for future research. Full article
Open AccessReview
Fluorescent and Colorimetric Electrospun Nanofibers for Heavy-Metal Sensing
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 61; doi:10.3390/bios7040061 -
Abstract
The accumulation of heavy metals in the human body and/or in the environment can be highly deleterious for mankind, and currently, considerable efforts have been made to develop reliable and sensitive techniques for their detection. Among the detection methods, chemical sensors appear as
[...] Read more.
The accumulation of heavy metals in the human body and/or in the environment can be highly deleterious for mankind, and currently, considerable efforts have been made to develop reliable and sensitive techniques for their detection. Among the detection methods, chemical sensors appear as a promising technology, with emphasis on systems employing optically active nanofibers. Such nanofibers can be obtained by the electrospinning technique, and further functionalized with optically active chromophores such as dyes, conjugated polymers, carbon-based nanomaterials and nanoparticles, in order to produce fluorescent and colorimetric nanofibers. In this review we survey recent investigations reporting the use of optically active electrospun nanofibers in sensors aiming at the specific detection of heavy metals using colorimetry and fluorescence methods. The examples given in this review article provide sufficient evidence of the potential of optically electrospun nanofibers as a valid approach to fabricate highly selective and sensitive optical sensors for fast and low-cost detection of heavy metals. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Spontaneous Charge Generation in Flowing Albumin Solutions at 35 °C and 38 °C
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 60; doi:10.3390/bios7040060 -
Abstract
The time dependence of a charge accumulation in a 10−15 M albumin solution, flowing through a measuring cell of an analytical flow system injector, had a nonlinear character under certain conditions, within a human physiological temperature range. Sharp charge increases depended on
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The time dependence of a charge accumulation in a 10−15 M albumin solution, flowing through a measuring cell of an analytical flow system injector, had a nonlinear character under certain conditions, within a human physiological temperature range. Sharp charge increases depended on albumin concentration. This effect must be taken into consideration when generating models that describe electrokinetic phenomena in flowing protein solutions and when developing analytical flow systems for the registration of biomolecules in low concentration ranges. Full article
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