Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Radar-Based Smart Sensor for Unobtrusive Elderly Monitoring in Ambient Assisted Living Applications
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 55; doi:10.3390/bios7040055 (registering DOI) -
Abstract
Continuous in-home monitoring of older adults living alone aims to improve their quality of life and independence, by detecting early signs of illness and functional decline or emergency conditions. To meet requirements for technology acceptance by seniors (unobtrusiveness, non-intrusiveness, and privacy-preservation), this study
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Continuous in-home monitoring of older adults living alone aims to improve their quality of life and independence, by detecting early signs of illness and functional decline or emergency conditions. To meet requirements for technology acceptance by seniors (unobtrusiveness, non-intrusiveness, and privacy-preservation), this study presents and discusses a new smart sensor system for the detection of abnormalities during daily activities, based on ultra-wideband radar providing rich, not privacy-sensitive, information useful for sensing both cardiorespiratory and body movements, regardless of ambient lighting conditions and physical obstructions (through-wall sensing). The radar sensing is a very promising technology, enabling the measurement of vital signs and body movements at a distance, and thus meeting both requirements of unobtrusiveness and accuracy. In particular, impulse-radio ultra-wideband radar has attracted considerable attention in recent years thanks to many properties that make it useful for assisted living purposes. The proposed sensing system, evaluated in meaningful assisted living scenarios by involving 30 participants, exhibited the ability to detect vital signs, to discriminate among dangerous situations and activities of daily living, and to accommodate individual physical characteristics and habits. The reported results show that vital signs can be detected also while carrying out daily activities or after a fall event (post-fall phase), with accuracy varying according to the level of movements, reaching up to 95% and 91% in detecting respiration and heart rates, respectively. Similarly, good results were achieved in fall detection by using the micro-motion signature and unsupervised learning, with sensitivity and specificity greater than 97% and 90%, respectively. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
A Gal-MµS Device to Evaluate Cell Migratory Response to Combined Galvano-Chemotactic Fields
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 54; doi:10.3390/bios7040054 -
Abstract
Electric fields have been studied extensively in biomedical engineering (BME) for numerous regenerative therapies. Recent studies have begun to examine the biological effects of electric fields in combination with other environmental cues, such as tissue-engineered extracellular matrices (ECM), chemical gradient profiles, and time-dependent
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Electric fields have been studied extensively in biomedical engineering (BME) for numerous regenerative therapies. Recent studies have begun to examine the biological effects of electric fields in combination with other environmental cues, such as tissue-engineered extracellular matrices (ECM), chemical gradient profiles, and time-dependent temperature gradients. In the nervous system, cell migration driven by electrical fields, or galvanotaxis, has been most recently studied in transcranial direct stimulation (TCDS), spinal cord repair and tumor treating fields (TTF). The cell migratory response to galvano-combinatory fields, such as magnetic fields, chemical gradients, or heat shock, has only recently been explored. In the visual system, restoration of vision via cellular replacement therapies has been limited by low numbers of motile cells post-transplantation. Here, the combinatory application of electrical fields with other stimuli to direct cells within transplantable biomaterials and/or host tissues has been understudied. In this work, we developed the Gal-MµS device, a novel microfluidics device capable of examining cell migratory behavior in response to single and combinatory stimuli of electrical and chemical fields. The formation of steady-state, chemical concentration gradients and electrical fields within the Gal-MµS were modeled computationally and verified experimentally within devices fabricated via soft lithography. Further, we utilized real-time imaging within the device to capture cell trajectories in response to electric fields and chemical gradients, individually, as well as in combinatory fields of both. Our data demonstrated that neural cells migrated longer distances and with higher velocities in response to combined galvanic and chemical stimuli than to either field individually, implicating cooperative behavior. These results reveal a biological response to galvano-chemotactic fields that is only partially understood, as well as point towards novel migration-targeted treatments to improve cell-based regenerative therapies. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Central [CNS] and Peripheral [Gastric Tissue] Selective Monitoring of Somatostatin (SRIF) with Micro-Sensor and Voltammetry in Rats: Influence of Growth Factors (GH, EGF)
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 53; doi:10.3390/bios7040053 -
Abstract
Somatostatin (SRIF) is widely distributed throughout the body, and regulates the endocrine system via interactions with various hormones, including the pituitary growth hormone, the thyroid stimulating hormone and the majority of the hormones of the gastrointestinal tract. SRIF is present in the central
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Somatostatin (SRIF) is widely distributed throughout the body, and regulates the endocrine system via interactions with various hormones, including the pituitary growth hormone, the thyroid stimulating hormone and the majority of the hormones of the gastrointestinal tract. SRIF is present in the central nervous system (CNS), where it affects rates of neurotransmission, and is also reported to be active in the intestinal tract, with evidence that stressed rats present a significant decrease in antral somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI). Analysis of SRIF has mainly been carried out by means of radioimmunoassay methods. Here, we propose the use of an electrochemical method, such as voltammetry, applied with carbon-based sensors and, in particular, the combination of differential pulse voltammetry with treated carbon fiber micro electrodes (DPV-µCFE) to facilitate the analysis of such peptidergic electro active hormones in the rat striatum and gastric tissue; the effect of growth hormone (GH) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), in particular, upon the SRIF signal has been studied in such tissues. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Ramanomics: New Omics Disciplines Using Micro Raman Spectrometry with Biomolecular Component Analysis for Molecular Profiling of Biological Structures
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 52; doi:10.3390/bios7040052 -
Abstract
Modern instrumentation for Raman microspectroscopy and current techniques in analysis of spectral data provide new opportunities to study molecular interactions and dynamics at subcellular levels in biological systems. Implementation of biomolecular component analysis (BCA) to microRaman spectrometry provides basis for the emergence of
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Modern instrumentation for Raman microspectroscopy and current techniques in analysis of spectral data provide new opportunities to study molecular interactions and dynamics at subcellular levels in biological systems. Implementation of biomolecular component analysis (BCA) to microRaman spectrometry provides basis for the emergence of Ramanomics, a new biosensing discipline with unprecedented capabilities to measure concentrations of distinct biomolecular groups in live cells and organelles. Here we review the combined use of microRaman-BCA techniques to probe absolute concentrations of proteins, DNA, RNA and lipids in single organelles of live cells. Assessing biomolecular concentration profiles of organelles at the single cell level provides a physiologically relevant set of biomarkers for cellular heterogeneity. In addition, changes to an organelle’s biomolecular concentration profile during a cellular transformation, whether natural, drug induced or disease manifested, can provide molecular insight into the nature of the cellular process. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Review on SERS of Bacteria
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 51; doi:10.3390/bios7040051 -
Abstract
Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS
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Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS spectra of bacteria. The kinds of SERS substrates employed to obtain SERS spectra are discussed as well as how bacteria interact with silver and gold nanoparticles. The roll of capping agents on Ag/Au NPs in obtaining SERS spectra is examined as well as the interpretation of the spectral data. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensor for 3-Hydroxybutyrate Detection Using Screen-Printed Electrodes Modified by Reduced Graphene Oxide and Thionine
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 50; doi:10.3390/bios7040050 -
Abstract
A biosensor for 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) involving immobilization of the enzyme 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase onto a screen-printed carbon electrode modified with reduced graphene oxide (GO) and thionine (THI) is reported here. After addition of 3-hydroxybutyrate or the sample in the presence of NAD+ cofactor,
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A biosensor for 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) involving immobilization of the enzyme 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase onto a screen-printed carbon electrode modified with reduced graphene oxide (GO) and thionine (THI) is reported here. After addition of 3-hydroxybutyrate or the sample in the presence of NAD+ cofactor, the generated NADH could be detected amperometrically at 0.0 V vs. Ag pseudo reference electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions, a calibration plot for 3-HB was constructed showing a wide linear range between 0.010 and 0.400 mM 3-HB which covers the clinically relevant levels for diluted serum samples. In addition, a limit of detection of 1.0 µM, much lower than that reported using other biosensors, was achieved. The analytical usefulness of the developed biosensor was demonstrated via application to spiked serum samples. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Strategies Using Bio-Layer Interferometry Biosensor Technology for Vaccine Research and Development
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 49; doi:10.3390/bios7040049 -
Abstract
Bio-layer interferometry (BLI) real-time, label-free technology has greatly contributed to advances in vaccine research and development. BLI Octet platforms offer high-throughput, ease of use, reliability, and high precision analysis when compared with common labeling techniques. Many different strategies have been used to immobilize
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Bio-layer interferometry (BLI) real-time, label-free technology has greatly contributed to advances in vaccine research and development. BLI Octet platforms offer high-throughput, ease of use, reliability, and high precision analysis when compared with common labeling techniques. Many different strategies have been used to immobilize the pathogen or host molecules on BLI biosensors for real-time kinetics and affinity analysis, quantification, or high-throughput titer. These strategies can be used in multiple applications and shed light onto the structural and functional aspects molecules play during pathogen-host interactions. They also provide crucial information on how to achieve protection. This review summarizes some key BLI strategies used in human vaccine research and development. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Encapsulation-Stabilized, Europium Containing Nanoparticle as a Probe for Time-Resolved luminescence Detection of Cardiac Troponin I
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 48; doi:10.3390/bios7040048 -
Abstract
The use of a robust optical signaling probe with a high signal-to-noise ratio is important in the development of immunoassays. Lanthanide chelates are a promising material for this purpose, which provide time-resolved luminescence (TRL) due to their large Stokes shift and long luminescence
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The use of a robust optical signaling probe with a high signal-to-noise ratio is important in the development of immunoassays. Lanthanide chelates are a promising material for this purpose, which provide time-resolved luminescence (TRL) due to their large Stokes shift and long luminescence lifetime. From this, they have attracted considerable interest in the in vitro diagnostics field. However, the direct use of lanthanide chelates is limited because their luminescent signal can be easily affected by various quenchers. To overcome this drawback, strategies that rely on the entrapment of lanthanide chelates inside nanoparticles, thereby enabling the protection of the lanthanide chelate from water, have been reported. However, the poor stability of the lanthanide-entrapped nanoparticles results in a significant fluctuation in TRL signal intensity, and this still remains a challenging issue. To address this, we have developed a Lanthanide chelate-Encapsulated Silica Nano Particle (LESNP) as a new immunosensing probe. In this approach, the lanthanide chelate is covalently crosslinked within the silane monomer during the silica nanoparticle formation. The resulting LESNP is physically stable and retains TRL properties of the parent lanthanide chelate. Using the probe, a highly sensitive, sandwich-based TRL immunoassay for the cardiac troponin I was conducted, exhibiting a limit of detection of 48 pg/mL. On the basis of the features of the LESNP such as TRL signaling capability, stability, and the ease of biofunctionalization, we expect that the LESNP can be widely applied in the development of TRL-based immunosensing. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Electrospun Chitosan-Gelatin Biopolymer Composite Nanofibers for Horseradish Peroxidase Immobilization in a Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 47; doi:10.3390/bios7040047 -
Abstract
A biosensor based on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymers nanofibers is found to be effective for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase to detect hydrogen peroxide. The biopolymer nanofibers were fabricated by an electrospining technique. Upon optimization of synthesis parameters, biopolymers nanofibers, an average of 80
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A biosensor based on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymers nanofibers is found to be effective for the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase to detect hydrogen peroxide. The biopolymer nanofibers were fabricated by an electrospining technique. Upon optimization of synthesis parameters, biopolymers nanofibers, an average of 80 nm in diameter, were obtained and were then modified on the working electrode surface. The effects of the concentration of enzyme, pH, and concentration of the buffer and the working potential on the current response of the nanofibers-modified electrode toward hydrogen peroxide were optimized to obtain the maximal current response. The results found that horseradish peroxidase immobilization on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymer nanofibers had advantages of fast response, excellent reproducibility, high stability, and showed a linear response to hydrogen peroxide in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1.7 mM with a detection limit of 0.05 mM and exhibited high sensitivity of 44 µA∙mM−1∙cm−2. The developed system was evaluated for analysis of disinfectant samples and showed good agreement between the results obtained by the titration method without significant differences at the 0.05 significance level. The proposed strategy based on chitosan-gelatin composite biopolymer nanofibers for the immobilization of enzymes can be extended for the development of other enzyme-based biosensors. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Development and Bioanalytical Applications of a White Light Reflectance Spectroscopy Label-Free Sensing Platform
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 46; doi:10.3390/bios7040046 -
Abstract
The development of a sensing platform based on white light reflectance spectroscopy (WLRS) is presented. The evolution of the system, from polymer film characterization and sensing of volatile organic compounds to biosensor for the label-free determination of either high (e.g., proteins) or low
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The development of a sensing platform based on white light reflectance spectroscopy (WLRS) is presented. The evolution of the system, from polymer film characterization and sensing of volatile organic compounds to biosensor for the label-free determination of either high (e.g., proteins) or low molecular weight analytes (e.g., pesticides), is described. At the same time, the passage from single to multi-analyte determinations, and from a laboratory prototype set-up to a compact device appropriate for on-site determination, is outlined. The improvements made on both the sensor and the optical set-up, and the concomitant advances in the analytical characteristics and the robustness of the assays performed with the different layouts, are also presented. Finally, the future perspectives of the system, aiming for the creation of a standalone instrument to be used by non-experts, will be discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
CFD Modeling of Chamber Filling in a Micro-Biosensor for Protein Detection
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 45; doi:10.3390/bios7040045 -
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the main causes of human death around the globe. The mortality rate for patients infected with active TB goes beyond 50% when not diagnosed. Rapid and accurate diagnostics coupled with further prompt treatment of the disease is the
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Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the main causes of human death around the globe. The mortality rate for patients infected with active TB goes beyond 50% when not diagnosed. Rapid and accurate diagnostics coupled with further prompt treatment of the disease is the cornerstone for controlling TB outbreaks. To reduce this burden, the existing gap between detection and treatment must be addressed, and dedicated diagnostic tools such as biosensors should be developed. A biosensor is a sensing micro-device that consists of a biological sensing element and a transducer part to produce signals in proportion to quantitative information about the binding event. The micro-biosensor cell considered in this investigation is designed to operate based on aptamers as recognition elements against Mycobacterium tuberculosis secreted protein MPT64, combined in a microfluidic-chamber with inlet and outlet connections. The microfluidic cell is a miniaturized platform with valuable advantages such as low cost of analysis with low reagent consumption, reduced sample volume, and shortened processing time with enhanced analytical capability. The main purpose of this study is to assess the flooding characteristics of the encapsulated microfluidic cell of an existing micro-biosensor using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The main challenge in the design of the microfluidic cell lies in the extraction of entrained air bubbles, which may remain after the filling process is completed, dramatically affecting the performance of the sensing element. In this work, a CFD model was developed on the platform ANSYS-CFX using the finite volume method to discretize the domain and solving the Navier–Stokes equations for both air and water in a Eulerian framework. Second-order space discretization scheme and second-order Euler Backward time discretization were used in the numerical treatment of the equations. For a given inlet–outlet diameter and dimensions of an in-house built cell chamber, different inlet liquid flow rates were explored to determine an appropriate flow condition to guarantee an effective venting of the air while filling the chamber. The numerical model depicted free surface waves as promoters of air entrainment that ultimately may explain the significant amount of air content in the chamber observed in preliminary tests after the filling process is completed. Results demonstrated that for the present design, against the intuition, the chamber must be filled with liquid at a modest flow rate to minimize free surface waviness during the flooding stage of the chamber. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Comparison of Sensitivity and Quantitation between Microbead Dielectrophoresis-Based DNA Detection and Real-Time PCR
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 44; doi:10.3390/bios7040044 -
Abstract
In this study, we describe a microbead-based method using dielectrophoresis (DEP) for the fast detection of DNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This electrical method measures the change in impedance caused by DEP-trapped microbeads to which biotinylated target DNA molecules are chemically
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In this study, we describe a microbead-based method using dielectrophoresis (DEP) for the fast detection of DNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). This electrical method measures the change in impedance caused by DEP-trapped microbeads to which biotinylated target DNA molecules are chemically attached. Using this method, measurements can be obtained within 20 min. Currently, real-time PCR is among the most sensitive methods available for the detection of target DNA, and is often used in the diagnosis of infectious diseases. We therefore compared the quantitation and sensitivity achieved by our method to those achieved with real-time PCR. We found that the microbead DEP-based method exhibited the same detection limit as real-time PCR, although its quantitative detection range was slightly narrower at 10–105 copies/reaction compared with 10–107 copies/reaction for real-time PCR. Whereas real-time PCR requires expensive and complex instruments, as well as expertise in primer design and experimental principles, our novel method is simple to use, inexpensive, and rapid. This method could potentially detect viral and other DNAs efficiently in combination with conventional PCR. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Raman Computational and Experimental Studies of Dopamine Detection
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 43; doi:10.3390/bios7040043 -
Abstract
A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of dopamine (DA) is presented in this work with the objective of achieving more accurate detection and monitoring of this neurotransmitter at very low concentrations, specific to physiological levels. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on silver nanoparticles was employed
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A combined theoretical and experimental analysis of dopamine (DA) is presented in this work with the objective of achieving more accurate detection and monitoring of this neurotransmitter at very low concentrations, specific to physiological levels. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy on silver nanoparticles was employed for recording DA concentrations as low as 10−11 molar. Quantum chemical density functional calculations were carried out using Gaussian-09 analytical suite software. Relatively good agreement between the simulated and experimentally determined results indicates the presence of different DA molecular forms, such as uncharged DA±, anionic DA, and dopaminequinone. Disappearance of the strongest bands of dopamine around 750 cm−1 and 790 cm−1, which suggests its adsorption onto the metallic surface, is not only consistent with all of these DA configurations, but also provides additional information about the analyte’s redox process and voltammetric detection. On the other hand, occurrence of the abovementioned Raman lines could indicate the formation of multilayers of DA or its presence in a cationic DA+ form. Thus, through coordinated experiment and theory, valuable insights into changes observed in the vibrational signatures of this important neurotransmitter can be achieved for a better understanding of its detection at physiological levels, which is crucial if further optovoltammetric medical device development is envisioned. Full article
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Open AccessReview
A Review on Passive and Integrated Near-Field Microwave Biosensors
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 42; doi:10.3390/bios7040042 -
Abstract
In this paper we review the advancement of passive and integrated microwave biosensors. The interaction of microwave with biological material is discussed in this paper. Passive microwave biosensors are microwave structures, which are fabricated on a substrate and are used for sensing biological
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In this paper we review the advancement of passive and integrated microwave biosensors. The interaction of microwave with biological material is discussed in this paper. Passive microwave biosensors are microwave structures, which are fabricated on a substrate and are used for sensing biological materials. On the other hand, integrated biosensors are microwave structures fabricated in standard semiconductor technology platform (CMOS or BiCMOS). The CMOS or BiCMOS sensor technology offers a more compact sensing approach which has the potential in the future for point of care testing systems. Various applications of the passive and the integrated sensors have been discussed in this review paper. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Biosensor Technology Reveals the Disruption of the Endothelial Barrier Function and the Subsequent Death of Blood Brain Barrier Endothelial Cells to Sodium Azide and Its Gaseous Products
Biosensors 2017, 7(4), 41; doi:10.3390/bios7040041 -
Abstract
Herein we demonstrate the sensitive nature of human blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells to sodium azide and its gaseous product. Sodium azide is known to be acutely cytotoxic at low millimolar concentrations, hence its use as a biological preservative (e.g., in antibodies). Loss
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Herein we demonstrate the sensitive nature of human blood-brain barrier (BBB) endothelial cells to sodium azide and its gaseous product. Sodium azide is known to be acutely cytotoxic at low millimolar concentrations, hence its use as a biological preservative (e.g., in antibodies). Loss of barrier integrity was noticed in experiments using Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) biosensor technology, to measure endothelial barrier integrity continuously in real-time. Initially the effect of sodium azide was observed as an artefact where it was present in antibodies being employed in neutralisation experiments. This was confirmed where antibody clones that were azide-free did not mediate loss of barrier function. A delayed loss of barrier function in neighbouring wells implied the influence of a liberated gaseous product. ECIS technology demonstrated that the BBB endothelial cells had a lower level of direct sensitivity to sodium azide of ~3 µM. Evidence of gaseous toxicity was consistently observed at 30 µM and above, with disrupted barrier function and cell death in neighbouring wells. We highlight the ability of this cellular biosensor technology to reveal both the direct and gaseous toxicity mediated by sodium azide. The sensitivity and temporal dimension of ECIS technology was instrumental in these observations. These findings have substantial implications for the wide use of sodium azide in biological reagents, raising issues of their application in live-cell assays and with regard to the protection of the user. This research also has wider relevance highlighting the sensitivity of brain endothelial cells to a known mitochondrial disruptor. It is logical to hypothesise that BBB endothelial dysfunction due to mitochondrial dys-regulation could have an important but underappreciated role in a range of neurological diseases. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Substituting Sodium Hydrosulfite with Sodium Metabisulfite Improves Long-Term Stability of a Distributable Paper-Based Test Kit for Point-of-Care Screening for Sickle Cell Anemia
Biosensors 2017, 7(3), 39; doi:10.3390/bios7030039 -
Abstract
Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic blood disorder that is particularly lethal in early childhood. Universal newborn screening programs and subsequent early treatment are known to drastically reduce under-five SCA mortality. However, in resource-limited settings, cost and infrastructure constraints limit the effectiveness
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Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic blood disorder that is particularly lethal in early childhood. Universal newborn screening programs and subsequent early treatment are known to drastically reduce under-five SCA mortality. However, in resource-limited settings, cost and infrastructure constraints limit the effectiveness of laboratory-based SCA screening programs. To address this limitation our laboratory previously developed a low-cost, equipment-free, point-of-care, paper-based SCA test. Here, we improved the stability and performance of the test by replacing sodium hydrosulfite (HS), a key reducing agent in the hemoglobin solubility buffer which is not stable in aqueous solutions, with sodium metabisulfite (MS). The MS formulation of the test was compared to the HS formulation in a laboratory setting by inexperienced users (n = 3), to determine visual limit of detection (LOD), readout time, diagnostic accuracy, intra- and inter-observer agreement, and shelf life. The MS test was found to have a 10% sickle hemoglobin LOD, 21-min readout time, 97.3% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity for SCA, almost perfect intra- and inter-observer agreement, at least 24 weeks of shelf stability at room temperature, and could be packaged into a self-contained, distributable test kits comprised of off-the-shelf disposable components and food-grade reagents with a total cost of only $0.21 (USD). Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Use of Wavelet Transform to Detect Compensated and Decompensated Stages in the Congestive Heart Failure Patient
Biosensors 2017, 7(3), 40; doi:10.3390/bios7030040 -
Abstract
This research work is aimed at improving health care, reducing cost, and the occurrence of emergency hospitalization in patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) by analyzing heart and lung sounds to distinguish between the compensated and decompensated states. Compensated state defines stable state
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This research work is aimed at improving health care, reducing cost, and the occurrence of emergency hospitalization in patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) by analyzing heart and lung sounds to distinguish between the compensated and decompensated states. Compensated state defines stable state of the patient but with lack of retention of fluids in lungs, whereas decompensated state leads to unstable state of the patient with lots of fluid retention in the lungs, where the patient needs medication. Acoustic signals from the heart and the lung were analyzed using wavelet transforms to measure changes in the CHF patient’s status from the decompensated to compensated and vice versa. Measurements were taken on CHF patients diagnosed to be in compensated and decompensated states by using a digital stethoscope and electrocardiogram (ECG) in order to monitor their progress in the management of their disease. Analysis of acoustic signals of the heart due to the opening and closing of heart valves as well as the acoustic signals of the lungs due to respiration and the ECG signals are presented. Fourier, short-time Fourier, and wavelet transforms are evaluated to determine the best method to detect shifts in the status of a CHF patient. The power spectra obtained through the Fourier transform produced results that differentiate the signals from healthy people and CHF patients, while the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) technique did not provide the desired results. The most promising results were obtained by using wavelet analysis. Wavelet transforms provide better resolution, in time, for higher frequencies, and a better resolution, in frequency, for lower frequencies. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Mediatorless Impedance Studies with Titanium Dioxide Conjugated Gold Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection
Biosensors 2017, 7(3), 38; doi:10.3390/bios7030038 -
Abstract
An impedimetric-based biosensor constructed using gold nanoparticles (AuNP) entrapped within titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection is the main feature of this research. The matrix of the biosensor employed the surface of TiO2
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An impedimetric-based biosensor constructed using gold nanoparticles (AuNP) entrapped within titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection is the main feature of this research. The matrix of the biosensor employed the surface of TiO2, which was previously modified with an amine terminal group using 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) at a low temperature to create a ready to immobilise surface for the biosensor application. Hemoglobin (Hb), which exhibits peroxidase-like activity, was used as the bioreceptor in the biosensor to detect H2O2 in solution. The analysis was carried out using an alternative impedance method, in which the biosensor exhibited a wide linear range response between 1 × 10−4 M and 1.5 × 10−2 M and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1 × 10−5 M without a redox mediator. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Silicon Integrated Dual-Mode Interferometer with Differential Outputs
Biosensors 2017, 7(3), 37; doi:10.3390/bios7030037 -
Abstract
The dual-mode interferometer (DMI) is an attractive alternative to Mach-Zehnder interferometers for sensor purposes, achieving sensitivities to refractive index changes close to state-of-the-art. Modern designs on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platforms offer thermally stable and compact devices with insertion losses of less than 1 dB
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The dual-mode interferometer (DMI) is an attractive alternative to Mach-Zehnder interferometers for sensor purposes, achieving sensitivities to refractive index changes close to state-of-the-art. Modern designs on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) platforms offer thermally stable and compact devices with insertion losses of less than 1 dB and high extinction ratios. Compact arrays of multiple DMIs in parallel are easy to fabricate due to the simple structure of the DMI. In this work, the principle of operation of an integrated DMI with differential outputs is presented which allows the unambiguous phase shift detection with a single wavelength measurement, rather than using a wavelength sweep and evaluating the optical output power spectrum. Fluctuating optical input power or varying attenuation due to different analyte concentrations can be compensated by observing the sum of the optical powers at the differential outputs. DMIs with two differential single-mode outputs are fabricated in a 250 nm SOI platform, and corresponding measurements are shown to explain the principle of operation in detail. A comparison of DMIs with the conventional Mach-Zehnder interferometer using the same technology concludes this work. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Rationally Designed Reversible ‘Turn-Off’ Sensor for Glutathione
Biosensors 2017, 7(3), 36; doi:10.3390/bios7030036 -
Abstract
γ-Glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine (GSH) plays a critical role in maintaining redox homeostasis in biological systems and a decrease in its cellular levels is associated with diseases. Existing fluorescence-based chemosensors for GSH acts as irreversible reaction-based probes that exhibit a maximum fluorescence (‘turn-on’) once the reaction
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γ-Glutamyl-cysteinyl-glycine (GSH) plays a critical role in maintaining redox homeostasis in biological systems and a decrease in its cellular levels is associated with diseases. Existing fluorescence-based chemosensors for GSH acts as irreversible reaction-based probes that exhibit a maximum fluorescence (‘turn-on’) once the reaction is complete, regardless of the actual concentration of GSH. A reversible, reaction-based ‘turn-off’ probe (1) is reported here to sense the decreasing levels of GSH, a situation known to occur at the onset of various diseases. The more fluorescent merocyanine (MC) isomer of 1 exists in aqueous solution and this reacts with GSH to induce formation of the ring-closed spiropyran (SP) isomer, with a measurable decrease in absorbance and fluorescence (‘turn-off’). Sensor 1 has good aqueous solubility and shows an excellent selectivity for GSH over other biologically relevant metal ions and aminothiol analytes. The sensor permeates HEK 293 cells and an increase in fluorescence is observed on adding buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH synthesis. Full article
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