Open AccessProject Report
Aircraft Geometry and Meshing with Common Language Schema CPACS for Variable-Fidelity MDO Applications
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 47; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020047 -
Abstract
This paper discusses multi-fidelity aircraft geometry modeling and meshing with the common language schema CPACS. The CPACS interfaces are described, and examples of variable fidelity aerodynamic analysis results applied to the reference aircraft are presented. Finally, we discuss three control surface deflection models
[...] Read more.
This paper discusses multi-fidelity aircraft geometry modeling and meshing with the common language schema CPACS. The CPACS interfaces are described, and examples of variable fidelity aerodynamic analysis results applied to the reference aircraft are presented. Finally, we discuss three control surface deflection models for Euler computation. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Public Safety Zones around Small and Medium Airports
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 46; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020046 -
Abstract
Proper planning around airports safeguards the surrounding territory from risks of air accidents. Many countries have defined Public Safety Zones (PSZs) beyond the runway thresholds as a result of targeted risk assessment methods. Therefore, national aviation Authorities could limit building construction and industrial
[...] Read more.
Proper planning around airports safeguards the surrounding territory from risks of air accidents. Many countries have defined Public Safety Zones (PSZs) beyond the runway thresholds as a result of targeted risk assessment methods. Therefore, national aviation Authorities could limit building construction and industrial development in order to contain the risk for dwellers to be involved in aircraft accidents. The number of people who live, work or congregate in these areas should be limited. The procedure to set Public Safety Zones is based on advanced technical analyses for major infrastructures. For smaller airports, simplified schemes are used, but, sometimes, they are not as effective when considering the actual safety conditions. This article aims to identify the shape and size of the Public Safety Zones for small and medium one-runway airports. The influence of the volume and mix of traffic on the PSZ geometry has been evaluated using the program named SARA (Sapienza Airport Risk Analysis); the results are correlated with the current Risk Plans generally adopted in Italy. According to the air traffic, the Risk Plans are characterized by a dynamic definition and fit the results obtained from risk assessment. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Uncertainty Evaluation in the Design of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Damage Detection
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 45; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020045 -
Abstract
The validation of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems for aircraft is complicated by the extent and number of factors that the SHM system must demonstrate for robust performance. Therefore, a time- and cost-efficient method for examining all of the sensitive factors must be
[...] Read more.
The validation of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems for aircraft is complicated by the extent and number of factors that the SHM system must demonstrate for robust performance. Therefore, a time- and cost-efficient method for examining all of the sensitive factors must be conducted. In this paper, we demonstrate the utility of using the simulation modeling environment to determine the SHM sensitive factors that must be considered for subsequent experiments, in order to enable the SHM validation. We demonstrate this concept by examining the effect of SHM system configuration and flaw characteristics on the response of a signal from a known piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) in an aluminum plate, using simulation models of a particular hot spot. We derive the signal responses mathematically and through the statistical design of experiments, we determine the significant factors that affect the damage indices that are computed from the signal, using only half the number of runs that are normally required. We determine that the transmitter angle is the largest source of variation for the damage indices that are considered, followed by signal frequency and transmitter distance to the hot spot. These results demonstrate that the use of efficient statistical design and simulation may enable a cost- and time-efficient sequential approach to quantifying sensitive SHM factors and system validation. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Simulation-Based Virtual Cycle for Multi-Level Airport Analysis
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 44; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020044 -
Abstract
The aeronautical industry is expanding after a period of economic turmoil. For this reason, a growing number of airports are facing capacity problems that can sometimes only be resolved by expanding infrastructure, with the inherent risks that such decisions create. In order to
[...] Read more.
The aeronautical industry is expanding after a period of economic turmoil. For this reason, a growing number of airports are facing capacity problems that can sometimes only be resolved by expanding infrastructure, with the inherent risks that such decisions create. In order to deal with uncertainty at different levels, it is necessary to have relevant tools during an expansion project or during the planning phases of new infrastructure. This article presents a methodology that combines simulation approaches with different description levels that complement each other when applied to the development of a new airport. The methodology is illustrated with an example that uses two models for an expansion project of an airport in The Netherlands. One model focuses on the operation of the airport from a high-level position, while the second focuses on other technical aspects of the operation that challenge the feasibility of the proposed configuration of the apron. The results show that by applying the methodology, analytical power is enhanced and the risk of making the wrong decisions is reduced. We identified the limitations that the future facility will have and the impact of the physical characteristics of the traffic that will operate in the airport. The methodology can be used for tackling different problems and studying particular performance indicators to help decision-makers take more informed decisions. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Simulation and Modeling of Rigid Aircraft Aerodynamic Responses to Arbitrary Gust Distributions
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 43; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020043 -
Abstract
The stresses resulting from wind gusts can exceed the limit value and may cause large-scale structural deformation or even failure. All certified airplanes should therefore withstand the increased loads from gusts of considerable intensity. A large factor of safety will make the structure
[...] Read more.
The stresses resulting from wind gusts can exceed the limit value and may cause large-scale structural deformation or even failure. All certified airplanes should therefore withstand the increased loads from gusts of considerable intensity. A large factor of safety will make the structure heavy and less economical. Thus, the need for accurate prediction of aerodynamic gust responses is motivated by both safety and economic concerns. This article presents the efforts to simulate and model air vehicle aerodynamic responses to various gust profiles. The computational methods developed and the research outcome will play an important role in the airplane’s structural design and certification. Cobalt is used as the flow solver to simulate aerodynamic responses to wind gusts. The code has a user-defined boundary condition capability that was tested for the first time in the present study to model any gust profile (intensity, direction, and duration) on any arbitrary configuration. Gust profiles considered include sharp edge, one minus cosine, a ramp, and a 1-cosine using tabulated data consisting of gust intensity values at discrete time instants. Test cases considered are a flat plate, a two-dimensional NACA0012 airfoil, and the high Reynolds number aero-structural dynamics (HIRENASD) configuration, which resembles a typical large passenger transport aircraft. Test cases are assumed to be rigid, and only longitudinal gust profiles are considered, though the developed codes can model any gust angle. Time-accurate simulation results show the aerodynamic responses to different gust profiles including transient solutions. Simulation results show that sharp edge responses of the flat plate agree well with the Küssner approximate function, but trends of other test cases do not match because of the thin airfoil assumptions made to derive the analytical function. Reduced order aerodynamic models are then created from the convolution integral of gust amplitude and the time-accurate responses to sharp-edge gusts. Convolution models are next used to predict aerodynamic responses to arbitrary gust profiles without the need of running time-accurate simulations for every gust shape. The results show very good agreement between developed models and simulation data. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Flight Load Assessment for Light Aircraft Landing Trajectories in Windy Atmosphere and Near Wind Farms
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 42; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020042 -
Abstract
This work focuses on the wake encounter problem occurring when a light, or very light, aircraft flies through or nearby a wind turbine wake. The dependency of the aircraft normal load factor on the distance from the turbine rotor in various flight and
[...] Read more.
This work focuses on the wake encounter problem occurring when a light, or very light, aircraft flies through or nearby a wind turbine wake. The dependency of the aircraft normal load factor on the distance from the turbine rotor in various flight and environmental conditions is quantified. For this research, a framework of software applications has been developed for generating and controlling a population of flight simulation scenarios in presence of assigned wind and turbulence fields. The JSBSim flight dynamics model makes use of several autopilot systems for simulating a realistic pilot behavior during navigation. The wind distribution, calculated with OpenFOAM, is a separate input for the dynamic model and is considered frozen during each flight simulation. The aircraft normal load factor during wake encounters is monitored at different distances from the rotor, aircraft speeds, rates of descent and crossing angles. Based on these figures, some preliminary guidelines and recommendations on safe encounter distances are provided for general aviation aircraft, with considerations on pilot comfort and flight safety. These are needed, for instance, when an accident risk assessment study is required for flight in proximity of aeolic parks. A link to the GitHub code repository is provided. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
AEROM: NASA’s Unsteady Aerodynamic and Aeroelastic Reduced-Order Modeling Software
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 41; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020041 -
Abstract
The origins, development, implementation, and application of AEROM, NASA’s patented reduced-order modeling (ROM) software, are presented. Using the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code, full and ROM aeroelastic solutions are computed at several Mach numbers and presented in the form of root
[...] Read more.
The origins, development, implementation, and application of AEROM, NASA’s patented reduced-order modeling (ROM) software, are presented. Using the NASA FUN3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code, full and ROM aeroelastic solutions are computed at several Mach numbers and presented in the form of root locus plots. The use of root locus plots will help reveal the aeroelastic root migrations with increasing dynamic pressure. The method and software have been applied successfully to several configurations including the Lockheed-Martin N+2 supersonic configuration and the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH, Sweden) generic wind-tunnel model, among others. The software has been released to various organizations with applications that include CFD-based aeroelastic analyses and the rapid modeling of high-fidelity dynamic stability derivatives. We present recent results obtained from the application of the method to the AGARD 445.6 wing that reveal several interesting insights. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Damage Detection in a Composite T-Joint Using Guided Lamb Waves
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 40; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020040 -
Abstract
Low velocity impact induces barely visible damage in the form of matrix cracking or delamination that can grow under hydro-thermo-mechanical loading and possibly lead to catastrophic failure if not detected at an early stage. A network of piezoelectric transducers can be used to
[...] Read more.
Low velocity impact induces barely visible damage in the form of matrix cracking or delamination that can grow under hydro-thermo-mechanical loading and possibly lead to catastrophic failure if not detected at an early stage. A network of piezoelectric transducers can be used to monitor a structure over time for life prognosis through generation and sensing of guided ultrasonic waves. The aim of this study is to design and develop such a sensing method for damage assessment in a composite T-joint subjected to mechanical impacts. In this context, monitoring of Lamb waves in a carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) T-joint has been completed where dispersion and tuning curves have been obtained. Guided waves are transmitted into the structure through different specified pairs of surface-bonded lead-zirconate-titanate (PZT) transducers in a pitch–catch active structural health monitoring (SHM) approach. With these experiments, Lamb wave fundamental modes (A0 and S0) are identified for monitoring impact damage by signal comparison with a prior obtained baseline. Detecting 4J and 10J inner impacts within the central region of the specimen is challenging when using conventional non-destructive techniques (NDT) because of the complex geometry and interference with the web. Signals are compared for the same selected sensing path; and amplitude differences have been observed in tuning curves after the 10J impact, which implies the occurrence of a structural change related to the impact. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Transducer Placement Option of Lamb Wave SHM System for Hotspot Damage Monitoring
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 39; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020039 -
Abstract
In this paper, we investigated transducer placement strategies for detecting cracks in primary aircraft structures using ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The approach developed is for an expected damage location based on fracture mechanics, for example fatigue crack growth in a high stress
[...] Read more.
In this paper, we investigated transducer placement strategies for detecting cracks in primary aircraft structures using ultrasonic Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The approach developed is for an expected damage location based on fracture mechanics, for example fatigue crack growth in a high stress location. To assess the performance of the developed approach, finite-element (FE) modelling of a damage-tolerant aluminum fuselage has been performed by introducing an artificial crack at a rivet hole into the structural FE model and assessing its influence on the Lamb wave propagation, compared to a baseline measurement simulation. The efficient practical sensor position was determined from the largest change in area that is covered by reflected and missing wave scatter using an additive color model. Blob detection algorithms were employed to determine the boundaries of this area and to calculate the blob centroid. To demonstrate that the technique can be generalized, the results from different crack lengths and from tilted crack are also presented. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Maintenance Model of Digital Avionics
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 38; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020038 -
Abstract
The cost of avionics maintenance is extremely high for modern aircraft. It can be as high as 30% of the aircraft maintenance cost. A great impact on the cost of avionics maintenance is provided by a high level of No Fault Found events
[...] Read more.
The cost of avionics maintenance is extremely high for modern aircraft. It can be as high as 30% of the aircraft maintenance cost. A great impact on the cost of avionics maintenance is provided by a high level of No Fault Found events (NFF). Intermittent faults are the leading cause of the NFF appearance in avionics. The NFF rate for avionics systems is between 20% and 50%. The practice of avionics operation and maintenance confirms the relevance of assessing the impact of intermittent faults on the maintenance cost and the choice of such option of the maintenance management, in which the negative impact of the intermittent faults is minimized. In this paper, a new mathematical model of digital avionics maintenance is developed. Key maintenance effectiveness indicators are selected. General mathematical expressions are obtained for the average availability, mean time between unscheduled removals (MTBUR), and expected maintenance cost of single unit and redundant avionics systems, which are subject to permanent failures and intermittent faults. The dependence of the maintenance effectiveness indicators on the rate of permanent failures and intermittent faults is investigated for the case of exponential distribution of time to failures and faults. The dependence of average availability on the number of spare units in the airline’s warehouse is also analyzed. On the base of the proposed maintenance model, different options of avionics maintenance management are considered. Numerical examples illustrate how to reduce the expected maintenance cost of avionics systems. Full article
Figures

Open AccessReview
Survey of the Current Activities in the Field of Modeling the Space Debris Environment at TU Braunschweig
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 37; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020037 -
Abstract
The Institute of Space Systems at Technische Universität Braunschweig has long-term experience in the field of space debris modeling. This article reviews the current state of ongoing research in this area. Extensive activities are currently underway to update the European space debris model
[...] Read more.
The Institute of Space Systems at Technische Universität Braunschweig has long-term experience in the field of space debris modeling. This article reviews the current state of ongoing research in this area. Extensive activities are currently underway to update the European space debris model MASTER. In addition to updating the historical population, the future evolution of the space debris environment is also being investigated. The competencies developed within these activities are used to address current problems with regard to the possibility of an increasing number of catastrophic collisions. Related research areas include, for example, research in the field of orbit determination and the simulation of sensor systems for the acquisition and cataloging of orbital objects. In particular, the ability to provide simulated measurement data for object populations in almost all size ranges is an important prerequisite for these investigations. Some selected results on the distribution of space debris on Earth orbit are presented in terms of spatial density. Furthermore, specific fragmentation events will be discussed. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Mechanical and Non-Destructive Study of CFRP Adhesive Bonds Subjected to Pre-Bond Thermal Treatment and De-Icing Fluid Contamination
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 36; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020036 -
Abstract
Composite materials are commonly used in many branches of industry. One of the effective methods to join the carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) parts includes the use of adhesives. There is a search on effective methods for quality assurance of bonded parts. In
[...] Read more.
Composite materials are commonly used in many branches of industry. One of the effective methods to join the carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) parts includes the use of adhesives. There is a search on effective methods for quality assurance of bonded parts. In the research here reported the influence of surface pre-bond modification on the adhesive bonds of CFRP plates has been analyzed. Adherends surface modifications, to include defects affecting the bonding quality, were obtained through surface thermal treatment, surface contamination with de-icing fluid and a combination of both the previously described treatments. Characterization of bonded joints was performed by means of mechanical testing, ultrasounds and electromechanical impedance (EMI) measurements. The study here proposed has also the aim to evaluate the ability of different destructive and non-destructive techniques to assess the quality of the bonds. While mechanical tests were strongly affected by the surface modifications, results obtained ultrasound and EMI test have demonstrate only a limited ability of these techniques to differentiate between the different samples. In fact, ultrasounds did not show any changes in the bondline, due to pre-bond modifications. However, this technique was able to detect delamination in CFRP for one of the samples thermally treated at 280 °C. Electromechanical impedance (EMI) measurements showed similar behavior as mechanical tests for samples thermally treated at 260 °C and 280 °C, and for the sample whose surface modification was made with a combination of thermally and de-icing fluid treatments. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Nozzle Exit Conditions on the Near-Field Development of High Subsonic and Underexpanded Axisymmetric Jets
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 35; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020035 -
Abstract
Detailed knowledge of jet plume development in the near-field (the first 10–15 nozzle exit diameters for a round jet) is important in aero-engine propulsion system design, e.g., for jet noise and plume infrared (IR) signature assessment. Nozzle exit Mach numbers are often high
[...] Read more.
Detailed knowledge of jet plume development in the near-field (the first 10–15 nozzle exit diameters for a round jet) is important in aero-engine propulsion system design, e.g., for jet noise and plume infrared (IR) signature assessment. Nozzle exit Mach numbers are often high subsonic but improperly expanded (e.g., shock-containing) plumes also occur; high Reynolds numbers (O (106)) are typical. The near-field is obviously influenced by nozzle exit conditions (velocity/turbulence profiles) so knowledge of exit boundary layer characteristics is desirable. Therefore, an experimental study was carried out to provide detailed data on nozzle inlet and exit conditions and near-field development for convergent round nozzles operated at Nozzle Pressure Ratios (NPRs) corresponding to high subsonic and supersonic (underexpanded) jet plumes. Both pneumatic probe and Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) measurements were made. The data revealed that internal nozzle acceleration led to a dramatic reduction in wall boundary layer thickness and a more laminar-like profile shape. The addition of a parallel wall extension to the end of the nozzle allowed the boundary layer to return to a turbulent state, increasing its thickness, and removing vena contracta effects. Differences in nozzle exit boundary layers exerted a noticeable influence but only in the first few diameters of plume development. The addition of the exit extension removed the vena contracta effects of the convergence only design. At underexpanded NPRs, this change to nozzle geometry modified the shock cell pattern and shortened the potential core length of the jet. Full article
Figures

Open AccessReview
Hybrid Propulsion Systems for Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 34; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020034 -
Abstract
The development of more efficient propulsion systems for aerospace vehicles is essential to achieve key objectives. These objectives are to increase efficiency while reducing the amount of carbon-based emissions. Hybrid electric propulsion (HEP) is an ideal means to maintain the energy density of
[...] Read more.
The development of more efficient propulsion systems for aerospace vehicles is essential to achieve key objectives. These objectives are to increase efficiency while reducing the amount of carbon-based emissions. Hybrid electric propulsion (HEP) is an ideal means to maintain the energy density of hydrocarbon-based fuels and utilize energy-efficient electric machines. A system that integrates different propulsion systems into a single system, with one being electric, is termed an HEP system. HEP systems have been studied previously and introduced into Land, Water, and Aerial Vehicles. This work presents research into the use of HEP systems in Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS). The systems discussed in this paper are Internal Combustion Engine (ICE)–Electric Hybrid systems, ICE–Photovoltaic (PV) Hybrid systems, and Fuel-Cell Hybrid systems. The improved performance characteristics in terms of fuel consumption and endurance are discussed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Fluid–Thermal–Structural Interaction on Boundary Layer Flow in Rectangular Supersonic Nozzles
Aerospace 2018, 5(2), 33; doi:10.3390/aerospace5020033 -
Abstract
The aim of this work is to highlight the significance of Fluid–Thermal–Structural Interaction (FTSI) as a diagnosis of existing designs, and as a means of preliminary investigation to ensure the feasibility of new designs before conducting experimental and field tests. The novelty of
[...] Read more.
The aim of this work is to highlight the significance of Fluid–Thermal–Structural Interaction (FTSI) as a diagnosis of existing designs, and as a means of preliminary investigation to ensure the feasibility of new designs before conducting experimental and field tests. The novelty of this work lies in the multi-physics simulations, which are, for the first time, performed on rectangular nozzles. An existing experimental supersonic rectangular converging/diverging nozzle geometry is considered for multi-physics 3D simulations. A design that has been improved by eliminating the sharp throat is further investigated to evaluate its structural integrity at design Nozzle Pressure Ratio (NPR 3.67) and off-design (NPR 4.5) conditions. Static structural analysis is performed by unidirectional coupling of pressure loads from steady 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and thermal loads from steady thermal conduction simulations, such that the simulations represent the experimental set up. Structural deformation in the existing design is far less than the boundary layer thickness, because the impact of Shock wave Boundary Layer Interaction (SBLI) is not as severe. FTSI demonstrates that the discharge coefficient of the improved design is 0.99, and its structural integrity remains intact at off-design conditions. This proves the feasibility of the improved design. Although FTSI influence is shown for a nozzle, the approach can be applied to any product design cycle, or as a prelude to building prototypes. Full article
Figures

Open AccessReview
Buoyancy-Induced Heat Transfer inside Compressor Rotors: Overview of Theoretical Models
Aerospace 2018, 5(1), 32; doi:10.3390/aerospace5010032 -
Abstract
Increasing pressures in gas-turbine compressors, particularly in aeroengines where the pressure ratios can be above 50:1, require smaller compressor blades and an increasing focus on blade-clearance control. The blade clearance depends on the radial growth of the compressor discs, which in turn depends
[...] Read more.
Increasing pressures in gas-turbine compressors, particularly in aeroengines where the pressure ratios can be above 50:1, require smaller compressor blades and an increasing focus on blade-clearance control. The blade clearance depends on the radial growth of the compressor discs, which in turn depends on the temperature and stress in the discs. As the flow inside the disc cavities is buoyancy-driven, calculation of the disc temperature is a conjugate problem: the heat transfer from the disc is coupled with the air temperature inside the cavity. The flow inside the cavity is three-dimensional, unsteady and unstable, so computational fluid dynamics is not only expensive and time-consuming, it is also unable to achieve accurate solutions at the high Grashof numbers found in modern compressors. Many designers rely on empirical equations based on inappropriate physical models, and recently the authors have produced a series of papers on physically-based theoretical modelling of buoyancy-induced heat transfer in the rotating cavities found inside compressor rotors. Predictions from these models, all of which are for laminar flow, have been validated using measurements made in open and closed compressor rigs for a range of flow parameters representative of those found inside compressor rotors. (The fact that laminar buoyancy models can be used for large Grashof numbers (up to 1012), where most engineers expect the flow to be turbulent, is attributed to the large Coriolis accelerations in the fluid core and to the fact that there is only a small difference between the rotational speed of the core and that of the discs.) As many as 223 separate tests were analysed in the validation of the models, and good agreement between the predictions and measurements was achieved for most of these cases. This overview paper has collected together the equations from these papers, which should be helpful to designers and research workers. The paper also points out the limitations of the models, all of which are for steady flow, and shows where further experimental evidence is needed. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
CFD Validation and Flow Control of RAE-M2129 S-Duct Diffuser Using CREATETM-AV Kestrel Simulation Tools
Aerospace 2018, 5(1), 31; doi:10.3390/aerospace5010031 -
Abstract
The flow physics modeling and validation of the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) subsonic intake Model 2129 (M2129) are presented. This intake has an 18 inches long S duct with a 5.4 inches offset, an external and an internal lip, forward and rear extended
[...] Read more.
The flow physics modeling and validation of the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE) subsonic intake Model 2129 (M2129) are presented. This intake has an 18 inches long S duct with a 5.4 inches offset, an external and an internal lip, forward and rear extended ducts, and a center-positioned bullet before the outlet. Steady-state and unsteady experimental data are available for this duct. The measurements include engine face conditions (pressure recovery, static pressure to free-stream total pressure ratio, and distortion coefficient at the worst 60 sector or DC60), as well as wall static pressure data along the duct. The intake has been modeled with HPCMP CREATETM-AV Kestrel simulation tools. The validation results are presented including the effects of turbulence models on predictions. In general, very good agreement (difference errors are less than 6%) was found between predictions and measurements. Secondary flow at the first bend and a region of flow separation are predicted at the starboard wall with an averaged DC60 coefficient of 0.2945 at the engine face. Next, a passive and an active flow control method are computationally investigated. The passive one uses vane-type vortex generators and the active one has synthetic jet actuators. The results show that considered passive and active flow control methods reduce the distortion coefficient at the engine face and the worst 60 sector to 0.1361 and 0.0881, respectively. The flow control performance trends agree with those obtained in experiments as well. These results give confidence to apply the Kestrel simulation tools for the intake design studies of new and unconventional vehicles and hence to reduce the uncertainties during their flight testing. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Numerical Simulation of Heat Transfer and Chemistry in the Wake behind a Hypersonic Slender Body at Angle of Attack
Aerospace 2018, 5(1), 30; doi:10.3390/aerospace5010030 -
Abstract
The effect of thermal and chemical boundary conditions on the structure and chemical composition of the wake behind a 3D Mach 7 sphere-cone at an angle of attack of 5 degrees and an altitude of roughly 30,000 m is explored. A special emphasis
[...] Read more.
The effect of thermal and chemical boundary conditions on the structure and chemical composition of the wake behind a 3D Mach 7 sphere-cone at an angle of attack of 5 degrees and an altitude of roughly 30,000 m is explored. A special emphasis is placed on determining the number density of chemical species which might lead to detection via the electromagnetic spectrum. The use of non-ablating cold-wall, adiabatic, and radiative equilibrium wall boundary conditions are used to simulate extremes in potential thermal protection system designs. Non-ablating, as well as an ablating boundary condition using the “steady-state ablation” assumption to compute a surface energy balance on the wall are used in order to determine the impacts of ablation on wake composition. On-body thermal boundary conditions downstream of an ablating nose are found to significantly affect wake temperature and composition, while the role of catalysis is found to change the composition only marginally except at very high temperatures on the cone’s surface for the flow regime considered. Ablation is found to drive the extensive production of detectable species otherwise unrelated to ablation, whereas if ablation is not present at all, air-species which would otherwise produce detectable spectra are minimal. Studies of afterbody cooling techniques, as well as shape, are recommended for further analysis. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Prilling and Coating of Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN) Solid Green Propellant in Toluene Mixture Using Ultrasound Sonication
Aerospace 2018, 5(1), 29; doi:10.3390/aerospace5010029 -
Abstract
Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN) in its generic form has a long needle shaped structure, which hinders higher solid loading. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to optimize its crystal morphology into octagonal shapes. Moreover, the low critical humidity level of ADN renders it unusable
[...] Read more.
Ammonium Dinitramide (ADN) in its generic form has a long needle shaped structure, which hinders higher solid loading. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to optimize its crystal morphology into octagonal shapes. Moreover, the low critical humidity level of ADN renders it unusable in a humid climate. Hence, encapsulation with a hydrophobic polymer is necessary. In the present work, ADN was synthesized by nitration of potassium sulfamate with mixed acid nitration. The product was then mixed with toluene, graphene, citryl ammonium butyl, Cab-o-sil, and coating polymer (Polystyrene or HTPB) and treated with ultrasound to obtain semi-spherical ADN-coated particles. The method offers a reduction in operating temperature and elimination of ADN melting in the shape-altering process. In addition, the ADN product has a similar particle size and thermal stability compared to those in a conventional ADN melt-prilling method. The ADN product investigated under SEM confirms the particle morphological change from long needles into semi-spherical shapes. The particle size obtained, in the micrometer range, is ideal for higher theoretical maximum density. Furthermore, the ultrasound-treated ADN particles show significant reduction in moisture absorption, from 68% to 16% at 65% relative humidity. The DSC result shows no degradation of thermal stability of the coated particles. Full article
Figures

Open AccessArticle
Multi-UAV Doppler Information Fusion for Target Tracking Based on Distributed High Degrees Information Filters
Aerospace 2018, 5(1), 28; doi:10.3390/aerospace5010028 -
Abstract
Multi-Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Doppler-based target tracking has not been widely investigated, specifically when using modern nonlinear information filters. A high-degree Gauss–Hermite information filter, as well as a seventh-degree cubature information filter (CIF), is developed to improve the fifth-degree and third-degree CIFs proposed
[...] Read more.
Multi-Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Doppler-based target tracking has not been widely investigated, specifically when using modern nonlinear information filters. A high-degree Gauss–Hermite information filter, as well as a seventh-degree cubature information filter (CIF), is developed to improve the fifth-degree and third-degree CIFs proposed in the most recent related literature. These algorithms are applied to maneuvering target tracking based on Radar Doppler range/range rate signals. To achieve this purpose, different measurement models such as range-only, range rate, and bearing-only tracking are used in the simulations. In this paper, the mobile sensor target tracking problem is addressed and solved by a higher-degree class of quadrature information filters (HQIFs). A centralized fusion architecture based on distributed information filtering is proposed, and yielded excellent results. Three high dynamic UAVs are simulated with synchronized Doppler measurement broadcasted in parallel channels to the control center for global information fusion. Interesting results are obtained, with the superiority of certain classes of higher-degree quadrature information filters. Full article
Figures