Special Issue "Biochar and Soil: What Is behind Its Impacts?"

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2018

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Kurt A. Spokas

USDA-ARS: Soil and Water Management Unit, Saint Paul, MN, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 612-626-2834
Interests: soil; carbon cycle; nutrient transport; agrochemical; biochar

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Despite the recent increase in biochar research, fundamental understanding of its positive agronomic alterations has remained elusive. This could suggest that a single mechanism is not behind its actions. This Special Issue will be dedicated to expand our understanding of mechanisms behind the impacts of biochar application to agricultural fields. Particularly, studies that explore innovative pathways and elucidate new insights into our understanding of biochar's effect on the soil system are particularly solicited. Field scale studies are preferred, but hypothesis driven laboratory and greenhouse studies will also be considered.

Dr. Kurt A. Spokas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biochar
  • Mechanisms
  • Yield Improvement
  • Soil Fertility

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Determining the Stability of Sugarcane Filtercake Biochar in Soils with Contrasting Levels of Organic Matter
Agriculture 2018, 8(6), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture8060071
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 14 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 26 May 2018
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Abstract
Sugarcane filtercake is a nutrient-rich residue produced prior to sugarcane distillation and is commonly disposed of by applying directly to agricultural fields, often causing high decomposition and leaching rates. Transforming this material into biochar could improve its stability in the soil. In this
[...] Read more.
Sugarcane filtercake is a nutrient-rich residue produced prior to sugarcane distillation and is commonly disposed of by applying directly to agricultural fields, often causing high decomposition and leaching rates. Transforming this material into biochar could improve its stability in the soil. In this 92-day incubation study, filtercake biochar produced at 400 °C (BC400) and 600 °C (BC600) was used to trace biochar stability when mixed with two soils with different organic matter levels: an agricultural field (1.2% carbon (C)) and a forest (2.8% C) soil. Based on δ13C isotope analysis, biochar decreases in the field soil mostly occurred in the coarse silt fraction. In contrast, biochar decreases in forest soil appeared to be more equally distributed in all particle size fractions. A negative priming effect in biochar-amended soils was noticeable, mainly in the forest soil. Cumulative CO2 emissions were greater in soils with BC400 than in those with BC600 for both field and forest soils, while adding biochar increased CO2 emissions only in field soils. This increase did not appear to affect native soil organic matter pools. High-temperature filtercake biochar could thus be a more stable alternative to the current practice of raw filtercake applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biochar and Soil: What Is behind Its Impacts?)
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