Special Issue "Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges"

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Kyriakos I. Kourousis

Senior Lecturer (Associate Professor)
School of Engineering, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: continuing airworthiness management; aircraft engineering, maintenance and technical support; aviation safety; defence engineering and support; engineering education and training

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The “Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges” Special Issue aims to cover a broad coverage of contemporary issues and research conducted in the fields of initial and continuing airworthiness, both in the civil and military aviation. This Special Issue offers the opportunity to academics, researchers and industry practitioners working in the broader airworthiness area to publish their original research and review articles.

Particular emphasis will be given on state-of-the art review works and theoretical, experimental, computational research and applied engineering work conducted on:

Initial Airworthiness

  • Aircraft and aeronautical components testing and certification;
  • Qualification and certification of new technologies, i.e., supersonic transport aircraft, electric and hybrid propulsion aircraft, etc.
  • Certification of systems specific to military aircraft;
  • Qualification and certification of additively manufactured metallic and non-metallic safe/non-safety critical aircraft parts;
  • Advanced testing and computational techniques for composite aircraft testing and certification;
  • Reliability engineering methodologies and practice in aircraft design and engineering changes;
  • Safety and risk assessment methodologies and practice in aircraft development;
  • Human factors’ considerations in aircraft design.

Continuing Airworthiness

  • Safety and risk assessment in aircraft flight and technical operations;
  • Reliability analysis of aircraft systems and components;
  • Continuing airworthiness management practice in civil and military aviation;
  • Development and optimization of aircraft maintenance programmes;
  • Development and optimization of military aircraft structural integrity (ASI) management programmes;
  • Effective and efficient inspection and sustainment techniques for composite aircraft;
  • Human factors in aircraft maintenance and operations;
  • Safety management effectiveness in flight and technical operations;
  • Quality management and optimization in aircraft maintenance organisations;
  • Aircraft technical and non-technical cost analysis and estimation techniques.

Dr. Kyriakos I. Kourousis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle EASA’s “Open” Category for Military UAS: Opportunities and Limitations in the Field of Airworthiness
Received: 31 May 2018 / Revised: 22 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 1 July 2018
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Abstract
The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) plans to establish a sole risk-based set of regulations for drones to grant access to European airspace, thus opening a multibillion-euro market. One part of this new regulation set is the so-called “open” category, imposing only a
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The European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) plans to establish a sole risk-based set of regulations for drones to grant access to European airspace, thus opening a multibillion-euro market. One part of this new regulation set is the so-called “open” category, imposing only a minimum set of regulations. The EASA’s approach presents a strong converse to traditional and prescriptive airworthiness regulations. For decades, unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) have been state-of-the-art assets in military forces. Aiming at the fulfilment of complex missions in extreme environments, in different theatres of operation, and with different partners, military UAS need to be reliable, safe, and interoperable. Therefore, NATO established internationally accepted airworthiness standards. However, these standards might be too severe to be adhered to by small, commercial, off-the-shelf UAS in the up-to-25 kg category, preventing the military from benefiting from the now fast-growing civil drone market. Based on a sound literature review, the paper presents the EASA’s upcoming regulations for civil UAS and discusses if they are applicable to military UAS. Possible opportunities, challenges, and limitations of applying the approach for the military are shown. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges)
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Open AccessArticle Use of Cost-Adjusted Importance Measures for Aircraft System Maintenance Optimization
Received: 28 May 2018 / Revised: 20 June 2018 / Accepted: 21 June 2018 / Published: 24 June 2018
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Abstract
The development of an aircraft maintenance planning optimization tool and its application to an aircraft component is presented. Various reliability concepts and approaches have been analyzed, together with objective criteria which can be used to optimize the maintenance planning of an aircraft system,
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The development of an aircraft maintenance planning optimization tool and its application to an aircraft component is presented. Various reliability concepts and approaches have been analyzed, together with objective criteria which can be used to optimize the maintenance planning of an aircraft system, subsystem or component. Wolfram® Mathematica v10.3 9 (Witney, UK) has been used to develop the novel optimization tool, the application of which is expected to yield significant benefits in selecting the most appropriate maintenance intervention based on objective criteria, in estimating the probability of nonscheduled maintenance and in estimating the required number of spare components for both scheduled and nonscheduled maintenance. As such, the results of the application of the tool can be used to assist the risk planning process for future system malfunctions, providing safe projections to facilitate the supply chain of the end user of the system, resulting in higher aircraft fleet operational availability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges)
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Open AccessArticle Differences in Risk Perception Factors and Behaviours amongst and within Professionals and Trainees in the Aviation Engineering Domain
Received: 5 April 2018 / Revised: 21 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 10 June 2018
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Abstract
In the aviation sector, the variability in the appreciation of safety risk perception factors and responses to risk behaviours has not been sufficiently studied for engineers and technicians. Through a questionnaire survey, this study investigated differences amongst professionals and trainees across eleven risk
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In the aviation sector, the variability in the appreciation of safety risk perception factors and responses to risk behaviours has not been sufficiently studied for engineers and technicians. Through a questionnaire survey, this study investigated differences amongst professionals and trainees across eleven risk perception factors and five indicative risk behaviour scenarios. The findings indicated significant differences between the two groups in four factors and three scenarios as well as within groups. Moreover, age, years of work and study and educational level were other factors accounting for such differences within each group of professionals and trainees. The results showing these significant differences are aligned with relevant research about pilots and indicate that the appreciation of risk perception factors by aviation engineers and the development of their risk behaviours deserves more attention. Our findings cannot be generalised due to the small sample and its distribution across the demographic variables. However, the results of this study suggest the need tailoring risk communication and training to address the different degrees to which influences of risk perception factors are comprehended, and risk behaviours emerge in aviation engineering trainees and professionals. Further research could focus on the development of a respective uniform framework and tool for the specific workforce group and could administer surveys to more extensive and more representative samples by including open-ended questions and broader social, organisational and systemic factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges)

Review

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Open AccessReview Cost-Effectiveness of Structural Health Monitoring in Fuselage Maintenance of the Civil Aviation Industry
Received: 6 June 2018 / Revised: 21 July 2018 / Accepted: 7 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
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Abstract
Although structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies using sensors have dramatically been developed recently, their capability should be evaluated from the perspective of the maintenance industry. As a first step toward utilizing sensors, the objective of the paper is to investigate the possibility of
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Although structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies using sensors have dramatically been developed recently, their capability should be evaluated from the perspective of the maintenance industry. As a first step toward utilizing sensors, the objective of the paper is to investigate the possibility of using sensors for inspecting the entire fuselage during C-check. First, we reviewed various sensors for their detection range, detectable damage size, and installed weight, which revealed that the piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) is the most promising sensor for aircraft SHM. Second, we performed a case study of inspecting the fuselage of Boeing-737NG using PWAS. To maintain the same detecting capability of manual inspection in C-check, we estimated the total number of sensors required. It turned out that utilizing sensors can reduce the maintenance downtime and thus, maintenance cost. However, even with a very conservative estimate, the lifetime cost was significantly increased due to the weight of sensor systems. The cost due to the weight increase was an order of magnitude higher than the cost saved by using SHM. We found that a large number of sensors were required to detect damage at unknown locations, which was the main cause of the weight increase. We concluded that to make SHM cost-effective, it would be necessary either to improve the current sensor technologies so that a less number of sensors are used or to modify the aircraft design concept for SHM. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Civil and Military Airworthiness: Recent Developments and Challenges)
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