Special Issue "Servant Leadership, New Directions in Research, Theory and Practice"

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2016)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dirk van Dierendonck

RSM Erasmus University, Burg Oudlaan 50, Rotterdam, The Netherlands
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Interests: servant leadership; leadership development; talent management; HR practices and employee flourishing
Guest Editor
Dr. Sigrun Gunnarsdóttir

Faculty of Business, University Bifrost, Bifröst 311, Iceland
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Interests: servant leadership; work environment; wellbeing at work; intrinsic motivation
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Kathleen A. Patterson

School of Business & Leadership, Regent University, Virginia Beach, VA 23464, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: servant leadership; vices and virtues in leadership

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Servant leadership is an area of research that is fast growing. Originating in the last century with Greenleaf’s original work, we are moving into a new era where the relevance for servant leadership is as current as ever. Research is teaching us about core elements that work and help move servant leadership into an evidence-based approach; organisations are working with its core principles, which teaches us about how it works in day-to-day, highly competitive markets.

For this Special Issue, we are looking to bring together a group of articles that together provide an overview of current thinking, empirical research and practice of the determinants, underlying processes and consequences of servant leadership (e.g., outcomes for employees, customers, patients); and add to the literature a continued understanding of how servant leadership works. We welcome papers that are purely conceptual, test theoretical models with quantitative survey data, or are grounded in qualitative data.

The current Special Issue is directly linked with the upcoming third Global Servant Leadership Research Roundtable in Iceland (see: thjonandiforysta.is/roundtable2016/). We encourage presenters at the roundtable to submit their paper to this special issue. Additionally, we also welcome submissions from people that are unable to join us in Iceland.

Prof. Dr. Dirk van Dierendonck
Dr. Sigrún Gunnarsdóttir
Prof. Dr. Kathleen Patterson
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Administrative Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • servant leadership
  • work environment
  • job satisfaction
  • wellbeing at work
  • motivation
  • implications
  • practice

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Leader Purposefulness within Servant Leadership: Examining the Effect of Servant Leadership, Leader Follower-Focus, Leader Goal-Orientation, and Leader Purposefulness in a Large U.S. Healthcare Organization
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 10; doi:10.3390/admsci7020010
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 25 April 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 5 May 2017
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Abstract
As the study of servant leadership expands beyond theoretical exploration, empirical research continues to validate the positive effect of servant leadership behaviors and attitudes on diverse follower and organizational measures. This study expands the conversation by engaging the theme of leader purposefulness within
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As the study of servant leadership expands beyond theoretical exploration, empirical research continues to validate the positive effect of servant leadership behaviors and attitudes on diverse follower and organizational measures. This study expands the conversation by engaging the theme of leader purposefulness within servant leadership studies. A sample of over 1700 employees from a large U.S. healthcare organization provided responses to five research instruments. Follower perspectives on servant leadership, leader follower-focus, leader goal-orientation, and leader purposefulness were assessed using the Purpose in Leadership Inventory and each of these independent variables were analyzed for hypothesized positive relationships with four dependent variables: follower job satisfaction, follower organizational commitment, follower person-organization fit, and follower perception of leadership effectiveness. Each of the 16 hypothesized relationships were supported at a statistically significant level (<0.001) with positive correlations ranging from 0.40 to 0.88. Regression analyses were conducted to provide predictive modeling and indicators of the relative importance of each independent variable on the related dependent variables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership, New Directions in Research, Theory and Practice)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle The Cross-Cultural Invariance of the Servant Leadership Survey: A Comparative Study across Eight Countries
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 8; doi:10.3390/admsci7020008
Received: 12 January 2017 / Revised: 17 March 2017 / Accepted: 10 April 2017 / Published: 17 April 2017
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Abstract
This paper tests and confirms the cross-cultural equivalence of the Servant Leadership Survey (SLS) in eight countries and languages: The Netherlands, Portugal, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Spain, Turkey and Finland. A composite sample consisting of 5201 respondents from eight countries that all filled out
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This paper tests and confirms the cross-cultural equivalence of the Servant Leadership Survey (SLS) in eight countries and languages: The Netherlands, Portugal, Germany, Iceland, Italy, Spain, Turkey and Finland. A composite sample consisting of 5201 respondents from eight countries that all filled out the SLS was used. A three-step approach was adopted to test configural invariance, measurement equivalence, and structural equivalence. For the full 30-item version of the SLS, configural invariance and partial measurement equivalence were confirmed. Implications of these results for the use of the SLS within cross-cultural studies are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership, New Directions in Research, Theory and Practice)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Can Servant Leaders Fuel the Leadership Fire? The Relationship between Servant Leadership and Followers’ Leadership Avoidance
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 6; doi:10.3390/admsci7010006
Received: 14 January 2017 / Revised: 20 February 2017 / Accepted: 21 February 2017 / Published: 27 February 2017
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Abstract
This study tested the effect of servant leadership on followers’ inclinations to strive for and, in contrast, to avoid leadership responsibility. Results from a study in the health care context, including two waves of data from 222 employees, revealed that servant leadership had
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This study tested the effect of servant leadership on followers’ inclinations to strive for and, in contrast, to avoid leadership responsibility. Results from a study in the health care context, including two waves of data from 222 employees, revealed that servant leadership had a small but positive effect on followers’ leadership avoidance. This effect was influenced by followers’ implicit conception of an ideal leader. Specifically, servant leadership was found to reduce leadership avoidance when the congruence with the followers’ ideal leader prototype was high. Furthermore, followers’ core self-evaluations and affective motivation to lead mediated the relationship between servant leadership and reduced leadership avoidance. Implications of these patterns for theory and practice and avenues for future research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership, New Directions in Research, Theory and Practice)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview The Functions of a Servant Leader
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(1), 5; doi:10.3390/admsci7010005
Received: 13 January 2017 / Revised: 10 February 2017 / Accepted: 20 February 2017 / Published: 24 February 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (976 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Servant leadership has been researched internationally and various types of favourable individual, team, and organisational outcomes have been linked to the construct. Different servant leadership measures have been validated to date and a clear distinction has been made between the theory of servant
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Servant leadership has been researched internationally and various types of favourable individual, team, and organisational outcomes have been linked to the construct. Different servant leadership measures have been validated to date and a clear distinction has been made between the theory of servant leadership and other leadership theories. However, it seems that research on the implementation of servant leadership within an organisation is still in need. The main functions of a servant leader are not yet conceptualised in the literature to help researchers or practitioners to implement servant leadership successfully within organisations. After conducting a systematic literature review, the main functions of a servant leader were identified. These functions were clustered into strategic servant leadership and operational servant leadership and supported by servant leadership characteristics and competencies as defined by current literature. The results of this study might help practitioners to develop servant leaders more effectively and assist organisations to cultivate a servant leadership culture within companies. Limitations and future research needs are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Servant Leadership, New Directions in Research, Theory and Practice)
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