Special Issue "Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations"

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A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2014)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Mary Tschirhart

Institute for Nonprofit Research, Education and Engagement, North Carolina State University, CB 7011, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 9195137031
Fax: +1 9195158806
Interests: nonprofit management and governance; cross-sector collaboration; membership associations; organizational theory and behavior

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This special issue offers authors the opportunity to explore leadership in the context of nonprofit organizations. Papers may address leadership by nonprofit boards, executive directors, staff, volunteers, donors, membership, or any combination of the above. Any aspect of leadership is appropriate for consideration as long as attention is given to building understanding of both nonprofits and leadership. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

• Leadership dynamics of founders of nonprofits
• Leadership in shared governance systems
• Leadership succession
• Leadership differences across nonprofit types
• Leadership as distinct from governance
• Leadership styles, approaches, and roles
• Leadership models

Given the great diversity within the nonprofit sector in this country and others, authors should carefully define their focus and the generalizability of their arguments and findings. Theoretical and empirical papers are welcome. Papers that build from and significantly extend the existing literature on leadership are particularly encouraged.

Dr. Mary Tschirhart
Guest Editor

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Administrative Sciences is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. For the first couple of issues the Article Processing Charge (APC) will be waived for well-prepared manuscripts. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Governance in the Arts and Culture Nonprofit Sector: Vigilance or Indifference?
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(4), 413-432; doi:10.3390/admsci4040413
Received: 4 July 2014 / Revised: 23 September 2014 / Accepted: 11 October 2014 / Published: 13 November 2014
PDF Full-text (248 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this article we attempt to contribute to governance research in the nonprofit area by proposing a conceptual framework inspired by recent developments in the literature. First, we analyze the governance of nonprofit organizations (hereafter, NPOs) from different theoretical perspectives, inspired by for-profit,
[...] Read more.
In this article we attempt to contribute to governance research in the nonprofit area by proposing a conceptual framework inspired by recent developments in the literature. First, we analyze the governance of nonprofit organizations (hereafter, NPOs) from different theoretical perspectives, inspired by for-profit, nonprofit and public sector theories on governance. After presenting a governance framework for NPOs, we explore empirically whether its various dimensions are being taken into account by NPOs in the arts and culture sector. Our findings suggest that, among NPOs in this sector, governance is still viewed as a narrow concept where board members are mainly passive, basically rubber-stamping decisions for the benefit of external funders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Leading, Following or Complementing in Economic Crisis: A Conceptual Model Illustrating Nonprofit Relationships with Public Schools
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 120-136; doi:10.3390/admsci4020120
Received: 21 February 2014 / Revised: 21 April 2014 / Accepted: 5 May 2014 / Published: 14 May 2014
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Abstract
Public and nonprofit organizations, entwined in the delivery of public goods and services, are in the midst of challenging economic times. In these circumstances, sound collaborative leadership may help bridge budget and program service delivery shortfalls. In this paper, we examine the administrative
[...] Read more.
Public and nonprofit organizations, entwined in the delivery of public goods and services, are in the midst of challenging economic times. In these circumstances, sound collaborative leadership may help bridge budget and program service delivery shortfalls. In this paper, we examine the administrative dynamics of mutual reliance between two prominent public and nonprofit organizations: public schools and parent-teacher groups (PTGs). We conclude that the partnership is changing as a result of external, economic forces. In essence, we are seeing a threat-rigidity response. The economic crisis may be responsible for causing PTGs to narrow their range of activities away from broader strategic issues that can be addressed through their confrontation activities and advocacy mission towards a narrower focus on classroom activities that protect core school operations, namely instruction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Toward a Collaborative, Transformative Model of Non-Profit Leadership: Some Conceptual Building Blocks
Adm. Sci. 2014, 4(2), 87-104; doi:10.3390/admsci4020087
Received: 20 May 2013 / Revised: 24 March 2014 / Accepted: 28 March 2014 / Published: 8 April 2014
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (332 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model
[...] Read more.
In this paper, the authors propose extending the construct of non-profit leadership to accommodate collaborative and transformational themes. The suggestion is that the resultant broader definition accords with the modern context within which non-profits now operate and feeds into a more resilient model of non-profit leadership. The paper begins with a review of emergent trends in leadership theory and the changing context of the non-profit sector. The argument is made that the extraordinary challenges facing the sector signal the need for fresh new perspectives in leadership. The authors then proceed to examine the significance of a nascent non-profit culture point to a re-alignment of the sector that is informed by transformational principles and a values-orientation. The result is said to be a new model of non-profit and public sector leadership that raises important methodological questions which the authors maintain can inform future analyses of the structure, role, and responsibilities of non-profit leadership. Finally, a world of new possibilities is envisioned, one in which non-profit organizations are strategically repositioned to take advantage of a new values-based ethic that is rooted in principles of integrity, increased self-awareness, a collaborative agenda, intentionality, emphasis of followership, cultural competence, and orientation toward the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)
Open AccessArticle Applying Emotional Intelligence Skills to Leadership and Decision Making in Non-Profit Organizations
Adm. Sci. 2013, 3(4), 202-220; doi:10.3390/admsci3040202
Received: 8 August 2013 / Revised: 21 October 2013 / Accepted: 24 October 2013 / Published: 4 November 2013
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Abstract
Non-profit organizations and leaders may benefit from the utilization of behaviors attributed to emotional intelligence. The consideration of emotional intelligence skills becomes a strategy for the development of the non-profit organizational leader’s ability to assess the impact and consequences of decisions, while simultaneously
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Non-profit organizations and leaders may benefit from the utilization of behaviors attributed to emotional intelligence. The consideration of emotional intelligence skills becomes a strategy for the development of the non-profit organizational leader’s ability to assess the impact and consequences of decisions, while simultaneously improving the quality and effectiveness of the decision-making process. The purpose of this paper is to identify how emotional intelligence skills can be applied to enhance the leadership decision-making processes within the non-profit organization. Goleman’s (2001) and Boyatzis’ et al. (2000) four essential elements of emotional intelligence and their associated 20 behavioral competencies are utilized to develop a methodology for the practical application of emotional intelligence skills to leadership decision-making within the non-profit organization. A checklist of questions and observations is provided to assist non-profit leaders in the improvement of emotional intelligence awareness, as well as the application of emotional intelligence skills to decisions and decision-making processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Leadership in Non-Profit Organizations)

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