Special Issue "Cluster Policy: Institutional and International Perspectives"

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maximilian Benner

Institute of Geography, Heidelberg University, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: regional structural policy and industrial policy (incl. innovation policy); cluster policy and smart specialisation; Middle Eastern political economy; Industrialization and structural transformation in the Middle East and North Africa; tourism policy and tourism clusters

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cluster policy has been a major topic in economic policy, both in industrialized and developing countries, for roughly two decades. Now that many cluster policies have been tried—some successfully, some less—it is worthwhile to compare lessons learned both from an international comparative perspective, and in relation to the institutional embeddedness of clusters and policies directed at them. Which cluster policies are being pursued in which institutional context? Are these policies adapted to their institutional setting? Or do they tend to follow a "one-size fits all" attitude? Do they allow for changing circumstances? And which role do they play in the context of political or societal transitions?
To address these questions, Administrative Sciences is soliciting articles for publication in a Special Issue. Articles should treat one of the following topics:

- Case studies of cluster policies and their adaptation to their institutional context
- Comparative studies of cluster policies in different institutional contexts
- Ways to embed cluster policies into institutional contexts
- Cluster policy in countries in transition, and their rationales
- Newer developments in cluster policy

Dr. Maximilian Benner
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Administrative Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

References:

Benner, Maximilian (2012): Cluster Policy: Principles and a Toolbox. SPACES online, Vol. 10, Issue 2012-01. Toronto and Heidelberg: www.spaces-online.com.

Castells, M., Hall, P. (1994): Technopoles of the World: The Making of 21st Century Industrial Complexes. London, New York: Routledge.

Enright, M. (2000): The globalizatuion of competition and the localization of competitive advantage: Policies toward regional clustering. In: Hood, N., Young, S. (eds): The Globalization of Multinational Enterprise Activity and Economic Development. London: Macmillan: 303-331.

Hospers, G.-J. (2005): "Best practices" and the dilemma of regional cluster policy in Europe. In: Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie 96: 452-457.

Ketels, C. H. M. (2013): Cluster policy: A guide to the state of debate. In: Meusburger, P., Glückler, J., el Meskioui, M. (eds): Knowledge and the Economy. Berlin, Heidelberg, New York: Springer: 249-269.

Kiese, M. (2008): Cluster approaches to local economic development. Conceptual remarks and case studies from Lower Saxony, Germany. In: Blien, U., Maier, G. (ed): The economics of regional clusters. Networks, technology and policy. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar: 269-303.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Cluster Activities in Different Institutional Environments. Case Studies of ICT-Clusters from Austria, Germany, Ukraine and Serbia
Adm. Sci. 2017, 7(2), 11; doi:10.3390/admsci7020011
Received: 4 January 2017 / Revised: 28 April 2017 / Accepted: 2 May 2017 / Published: 9 May 2017
PDF Full-text (690 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In recent decades, numerous cluster associations with public and/or private support have been established to facilitate clusters. These cluster associations have launched a number of activities and services aiming to increase the competitiveness, innovation, and productivity of their members and beyond. At the
[...] Read more.
In recent decades, numerous cluster associations with public and/or private support have been established to facilitate clusters. These cluster associations have launched a number of activities and services aiming to increase the competitiveness, innovation, and productivity of their members and beyond. At the same time, it appears that many of these associations apply similar activity bundles to reach their objectives. However, the institutional context differs between clusters and their countries. This paper questions how these activity bundles are influenced by different sets of institutional conditions and proposes a framework for the explorative analysis of cluster activity bundles in specific institutional environments. Moreover, using the framework, a detailed review of cluster associations and their activities in different information and communication technologies (ICT) clusters is presented, the development of which is central to regional advanced industrial transformation in the context of regional smart specialization and the Industrial Renaissance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cluster Policy: Institutional and International Perspectives)
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Open AccessArticle Local Management of National Cluster Policies: Comparative Case Studies of Japanese, German, and French Biotechnology Clusters
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(4), 213-239; doi:10.3390/admsci5040213
Received: 27 April 2015 / Revised: 23 October 2015 / Accepted: 27 October 2015 / Published: 3 November 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (579 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Cluster policies have attracted increasing attention worldwide, but only a few studies have focused on their management by local cluster organizations. We investigate the relationship between national cluster policies and their management by local cluster organizations from a comparative perspective. For this purpose,
[...] Read more.
Cluster policies have attracted increasing attention worldwide, but only a few studies have focused on their management by local cluster organizations. We investigate the relationship between national cluster policies and their management by local cluster organizations from a comparative perspective. For this purpose, we provide a detailed comparison of national cluster policies in Japan, Germany, and France as well as six prominent biotechnology clusters in these countries. Information on the focal clusters and on the management of cluster policies was obtained using semi-structured interviews with cluster managers. We find that national cluster policies considerably differ among these countries according to basic conditions of clusters and that the patterns of national cluster policy are closely related to those of local cluster management, despite some differences between clusters in the same country caused by various regional characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cluster Policy: Institutional and International Perspectives)
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Open AccessArticle Cluster Policy in the Light of Institutional Context—A Comparative Study of Transition Countries
Adm. Sci. 2015, 5(4), 188-212; doi:10.3390/admsci5040188
Received: 28 April 2015 / Revised: 3 September 2015 / Accepted: 22 October 2015 / Published: 30 October 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The business environment in transition countries is often extraordinarily challenging for companies. The transition process these countries find themselves in leads to constant changes in the institutional environment. Hence, institutional voids prevail. These institutional voids cause competitive disadvantages for small and medium enterprises.
[...] Read more.
The business environment in transition countries is often extraordinarily challenging for companies. The transition process these countries find themselves in leads to constant changes in the institutional environment. Hence, institutional voids prevail. These institutional voids cause competitive disadvantages for small and medium enterprises. Cluster policy can address these competitive disadvantages. As cluster policy generally aims at supporting companies’ competitive advantage by spurring innovation and productivity, it can help to bridge institutional voids. This article’s research question aims at analyzing and comparing cluster policies in the institutional context of two transition countries (Serbia and Tunisia) and analyzes to what extent cluster policies in these two countries are adapted to institutional voids prevailing there. The case studies offer insights into apparent difficulties of clusters in bridging formal institutional voids, as well as, notably, into the informal void of skill mismatches in the labor market. Still, for some specific voids, clusters do at least implicitly assume a bridging role. While the cluster policies examined do not explicitly target the institutional voids identified, cluster management can—in the course of time—align its service offering more closely with these voids. Bottom-up designed cluster policies can play an especially important role in such an evolution towards bridging institutional voids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cluster Policy: Institutional and International Perspectives)
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