Table of Contents

Clocks & Sleep, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2018)

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Open AccessArticle Sleep Quality and Chronotype Differences between Elite Athletes and Non-Athlete Controls
Clocks & Sleep 2018, 1(1), 3-12; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010002
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 13 August 2018 / Accepted: 30 August 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
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Abstract
Previous research has found that elite athletes have insufficient sleep, yet the specific kinds of sleep disturbances occurring as compared to a control group are limited. Here we compare the subjective sleep quality and chronotype of elite athletes to a control group of
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Previous research has found that elite athletes have insufficient sleep, yet the specific kinds of sleep disturbances occurring as compared to a control group are limited. Here we compare the subjective sleep quality and chronotype of elite athletes to a control group of non-athlete good sleepers. Sixty-three winter Canadian National Team athletes (mean age 26.0 ± 0.0; 32% females) completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Athlete Morningness Eveningness Scale. They were compared to 83 healthy, non-athlete, good-sleeper controls (aged 27.3 ± 3.7; 51% females) who completed the PSQI and the Composite Scale of Morningness. The elite athletes reported poorer sleep quality (PSQI global score 5.0 ± 2.6) relative to the controls (PSQI global score 2.6 ± 1.3), despite there being no group difference in self-reported sleep duration (athletes 8.1 ± 1.0 h; controls 8.0 ± 0.7 h). Further, athletes’ chronotype distribution showed a greater skew toward morningness, despite there being no group differences in self-reported usual bedtime and wake time. These results suggest that a misalignment of sleep times with circadian preference could contribute to poorer sleep quality in elite athletes. Full article
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Open AccessEditorial Clocks & Sleep: A New Open-Access Journal to Publish Your Circadian and Sleep Research Results
Clocks & Sleep 2018, 1(1), 1-2; https://doi.org/10.3390/clockssleep1010001
Received: 13 April 2018 / Revised: 13 April 2018 / Accepted: 13 April 2018 / Published: 18 April 2018
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Abstract
Exciting new discoveries in the circadian and sleep field have mushroomed in the past 10 years, culminating in the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine being awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and MichaelW. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms
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Exciting new discoveries in the circadian and sleep field have mushroomed in the past 10 years, culminating in the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine being awarded to Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash, and MichaelW. Young for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. [...] Full article
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