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J. Otorhinolaryngol. Hear. Balance Med. 2018, 1(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/ohbm1010006

Silent Vestibulopathy in Asymmetric Hearing Loss Can Be a Sign of a Cerebellopontine Angle Tumor

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon 405-760, Korea
2
Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea
These authors contributed equally to this work.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 6 February 2018 / Accepted: 15 February 2018 / Published: 16 February 2018
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Abstract

The presence of an ipsilateral cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumor should be ruled out in patients with asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL). Although many patients with CPA tumors have ipsilateral vestibular hypofunction, some of them do not experience dizziness even with ipsilateral vestibular hypofunction. We analyzed the incidence of CPA tumors among patients with ASNHL without subjective dizziness based on the presence of vestibulopathy. We hypothesized that a patient with silent unilateral vestibular hypofunction (UVH) is more likely to be diagnosed with a CPA tumor. Among 157 subjects who underwent MRI for ASNHL, those who did not have “subjective dizziness” were selected. All subjects underwent hearing and vestibular function tests. UVH was diagnosed if canal paresis ≥ 25%, positive head-shake nystagmus, or gain of head-impulse test < 0.8 were detected. The diameters of the CPA tumors were measured along the petrosal ridge on the axial plane of MRI. Among the enrolled subjects, 44 (28.02%) were diagnosed with a CPA tumor. The 37 patients (84.1%) with a CPA tumor had silent UVH, while only 33 of the 113 patients (29.2%) without a CPA tumor had silent UVH (chi-square test, odds ratio = 12.8, p < 0.001). Silent UVH in patients with ASNHL may be a sign of a CPA tumor. View Full-Text
Keywords: asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss; cerebellopontine angle tumors; unilateral vestibular hypofunction asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss; cerebellopontine angle tumors; unilateral vestibular hypofunction
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Sunwoo, W.; Jeon, Y.J.; Park, H.G.; Song, Y.; Song, J.-J.; Choi, B.Y.; Koo, J.-W. Silent Vestibulopathy in Asymmetric Hearing Loss Can Be a Sign of a Cerebellopontine Angle Tumor. J. Otorhinolaryngol. Hear. Balance Med. 2018, 1, 6.

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J. Otorhinolaryngol. Hear. Balance Med. EISSN 2504-463X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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