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Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2018, 3(2), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed3020064

Paediatric Strongyloidiasis in Central Australia

1
BBioMedSci MBBS Hons, Paediatric Senior Registrar, Department of Paediatrics, Alice Springs Hospital, P.O. Box 2234, Alice Springs NT 0871, Australia
2
FRACP, Head of Department, Department of Paediatrics, Alice Springs Hospital, P.O. Box 2234, Alice Springs NT 0871, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 6 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 June 2018 / Published: 13 June 2018
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Abstract

Few published studies are available describing the prevalence of paediatric strongyloidiasis in endemic areas within Australia. This literature review and exploratory clinical audit presents the first seroprevalence data for paediatric patients in Central Australia. A total of 16.1% (30/186) of paediatric inpatients tested for Strongyloides stercoralis in 2016 were seropositive (95% CI: 11.5% to 22.1%). Eosinophilia of unknown aetiology was the most common indication for testing (91.9%). Seropositive patients were significantly more likely to reside in communities outside of Alice Springs (p = 0.02). Seropositive patients were noted to have higher mean eosinophil counts with a mean difference of 0.86 × 109/L (95% CI: 0.56 to 1.16, p < 0.0001), although the limited utility of eosinophilia as a surrogate marker of strongyloidiasis has been described previously. All seropositive patients were Indigenous. There was no significant difference in ages between groups. There was a male predominance in the seropositive group, although this was not significant (p = 0.12). Twelve patients had known human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1) status and all were seronegative. Further research describing the epidemiology of strongyloidiasis in Central Australia is required. View Full-Text
Keywords: strongyloidiasis; Strongyloides stercoralis; Indigenous; child health; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; epidemiology; Central Australia strongyloidiasis; Strongyloides stercoralis; Indigenous; child health; Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander; epidemiology; Central Australia
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
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Wilson, A.; Fearon, D. Paediatric Strongyloidiasis in Central Australia. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2018, 3, 64.

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