Next Article in Journal
Community Awareness on Rabies Prevention and Control in Bicol, Philippines: Pre- and Post-Project Implementation
Next Article in Special Issue
Echinococcus Granulosus Infection in Two Free-Ranging Lumholtz’s Tree-Kangaroo (Dendrolagus lumholtzi) from the Atherton Tablelands, Queensland
Previous Article in Journal
Development and Clinical Validation of a Multiplex Real-Time Quantitative PCR Assay for Human Infection by Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Ehrlichia chaffeensis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Application of PCR-Based Tools to Explore Strongyloides Infection in People in Parts of Northern Australia
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2018, 3(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed3010015

Cross-Cultural, Aboriginal Language, Discovery Education for Health Literacy and Informed Consent in a Remote Aboriginal Community in the Northern Territory, Australia

1
ARDS Aboriginal Corporation, Winnellie, NT 0821, Australia
2
Department of Pharmacy and Applied Science, La Trobe University, Bendigo, VIC 3552, Australia
3
Menzies School of Health Research, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0811, Australia
4
Yalu’ Marŋgithinyaraw, Galiwin’ku, NT 0822, Australia
5
School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Bundaberg, QLD 4670, Australia
6
College of Medicine and Dentistry, Anton Breinl Research Centre for Health Systems Strengthening, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811, Australia
The author has passed away.
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 10 December 2017 / Revised: 20 January 2018 / Accepted: 20 January 2018 / Published: 29 January 2018
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [1001 KB, uploaded 29 January 2018]   |  

Abstract

Background: Education for health literacy of Australian Aboriginal people living remotely is challenging as their languages and worldviews are quite different from English language and Western worldviews. Becoming health literate depends on receiving comprehensible information in a culturally acceptable manner. Methods: The study objective was to facilitate oral health literacy through community education about scabies and strongyloidiasis, including their transmission and control, preceding an ivermectin mass drug administration (MDA) for these diseases. A discovery education approach where health concepts are connected to cultural knowledge in the local language was used. Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal educators worked collaboratively to produce an in-depth flip-chart of the relevant stories in the local language and to share them with clan elders and 27% of the population. Results: The community health education was well received. Feedback indicated that the stories were being discussed in the community and that the mode of transmission of strongyloidiasis was understood. Two-thirds of the population participated in the MDA. This study documents the principles and practice of a method of making important Western health knowledge comprehensible to Aboriginal people. This method would be applicable wherever language and culture of the people differ from language and culture of health professionals. View Full-Text
Keywords: cross-cultural health education; health education; Aboriginal language; worldview; health literacy; discovery education; informed consent; scabies; strongyloidiasis cross-cultural health education; health education; Aboriginal language; worldview; health literacy; discovery education; informed consent; scabies; strongyloidiasis
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Shield, J.M.; Kearns, T.M.; Garŋgulkpuy, J.; Walpulay, L.; Gundjirryirr, R.; Bundhala, L.; Djarpanbuluwuy, V.; Andrews, R.M.; Judd, J. Cross-Cultural, Aboriginal Language, Discovery Education for Health Literacy and Informed Consent in a Remote Aboriginal Community in the Northern Territory, Australia. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2018, 3, 15.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. EISSN 2414-6366 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top