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Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2017, 2(4), 55; doi:10.3390/tropicalmed2040055

Confronting the Emerging Threat to Public Health in Northern Australia of Neglected Indigenous Arboviruses

1
School of Health, Medical & Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia
2
Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059, Australia
3
School of Health, Medical & Applied Sciences, Central Queensland University, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 11 September 2017 / Revised: 6 October 2017 / Accepted: 12 October 2017 / Published: 17 October 2017
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Abstract

In excess of 75 arboviruses have been identified in Australia, some of which are now well established as causative agents of debilitating diseases. These include Ross River virus, Barmah Forest virus, and Murray Valley encephalitis virus, each of which may be detected by both antibody-based recognition and molecular typing. However, for most of the remaining arboviruses that may be associated with pathology in humans, routine tests are not available to diagnose infection. A number of these so-called ‘neglected’ or ‘orphan’ arboviruses that are indigenous to Australia might have been infecting humans at a regular rate for decades. Some of them may be associated with undifferentiated febrile illness—fever, the cause of which is not obvious—for which around half of all cases each year remain undiagnosed. This is of particular relevance to Northern Australia, given the Commonwealth Government’s transformative vision for the midterm future of massive infrastructure investment in this region. An expansion of the industrial and business development of this previously underpopulated region is predicted. This is set to bring into intimate proximity infection-naïve human hosts, native reservoir animals, and vector mosquitoes, thereby creating a perfect storm for increased prevalence of infection with neglected Australian arboviruses. Moreover, the escalating rate and effects of climate change that are increasingly observed in the tropical north of the country are likely to lead to elevated numbers of arbovirus-transmitting mosquitoes. As a commensurate response, continuing assiduous attention to vector monitoring and control is required. In this overall context, improved epidemiological surveillance and diagnostic screening, including establishing novel, rapid pan-viral tests to facilitate early diagnosis and appropriate treatment of febrile primary care patients, should be considered a public health priority. Investment in a rigorous identification program would reduce the possibility of significant outbreaks of these indigenous arboviruses at a time when population growth accelerates in Northern Australia. View Full-Text
Keywords: arbovirus; neglected; undifferentiated febrile illness; Northern Australia; diagnostics; control; prevention arbovirus; neglected; undifferentiated febrile illness; Northern Australia; diagnostics; control; prevention
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Gyawali, N.; Taylor-Robinson, A.W. Confronting the Emerging Threat to Public Health in Northern Australia of Neglected Indigenous Arboviruses. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2017, 2, 55.

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