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Urban Sci. 2017, 1(2), 19; doi:10.3390/urbansci1020019

Historic Roots of Modern Residential Segregation in a Southwestern Metropolis: San Antonio, Texas in 1910 and 2010

1
Urban and Regional Planning Program, College of Architecture, Construction and Planning, The University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
2
Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 33 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA
3
Department of History, Geography and Philosophy, College of Liberal Arts, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 43605, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA
4
Department of Demography, College of Public Policy, The University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jesús Manuel González Pérez
Received: 19 April 2017 / Revised: 18 May 2017 / Accepted: 27 May 2017 / Published: 1 June 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Urban Inequality)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3394 KB, uploaded 1 June 2017]   |  

Abstract

This study seeks to understand the historic roots of modern segregation by comparing residential racial patterns in the city of San Antonio over time. The year 1910 is recreated for San Antonio by georeferencing and digitizing historic Sanborn maps and aligning residential structures with historical census and city directory race data for the head of household. The historical point data are aggregated to the census block level and compared to 2010 householder race data by calculating the two most common dimensions of residential segregation: evenness (dissimilarity and Theil’s index) and exposure (isolation and interaction). The findings reveal that by 1910 San Antonio was already a remarkably segregated city and the original patterns of residential segregation resemble contemporary San Antonio. Particularly, residential racial segregation in the Hispanic concentrated southwestern portion of the city has increased over time resulting in an exceptionally racially divided metropolis. View Full-Text
Keywords: residential segregation; race; San Antonio; Hispanic residential segregation; race; San Antonio; Hispanic
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Walter, R.J.; Foote, N.; Cordoba, H.A.; Sparks, C. Historic Roots of Modern Residential Segregation in a Southwestern Metropolis: San Antonio, Texas in 1910 and 2010. Urban Sci. 2017, 1, 19.

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