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Quantum Beam Sci., Volume 1, Issue 1 (June 2017)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial Quantum Beam Science—Applications to Probe or Influence Matter and Materials
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 1; doi:10.3390/qubs1010001
Received: 22 February 2017 / Revised: 22 February 2017 / Accepted: 22 February 2017 / Published: 28 February 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (199 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The concept of quantum beams unifies a multitude of different kinds of radiation that can be considered as both waves and particles [...] Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle Irradiation Facilities of the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 2; doi:10.3390/qubs1010002
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 27 February 2017 / Accepted: 13 March 2017 / Published: 20 March 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8303 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews
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The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews this unique accelerator complex in detail from the viewpoint of its configuration, accelerator specification, typical accelerator, or irradiation technologies and ion beam applications. The institute has also irradiation facilities for electron beams and 60Co gamma-rays and has been leading research and development of radiation chemistry for industrial applications in Japan with the facilities since its establishment. The configuration and utilization of those facilities are outlined as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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Open AccessArticle Explosive Nucleosynthesis Study Using Laser Driven γ-ray Pulses
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 3; doi:10.3390/qubs1010003
Received: 28 December 2016 / Revised: 1 March 2017 / Accepted: 14 March 2017 / Published: 20 March 2017
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Abstract
We propose nuclear experiments using γ-ray pulses provided from high field plasma generated by high peak power laser. These γ-ray pulses have the excellent features of extremely short pulse, high intensity, and continuous energy distribution. These features are suitable for the
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We propose nuclear experiments using γ-ray pulses provided from high field plasma generated by high peak power laser. These γ-ray pulses have the excellent features of extremely short pulse, high intensity, and continuous energy distribution. These features are suitable for the study of explosive nucleosyntheses in novae and supernovae, such as the γ process and ν process. We discuss how to generate suitable γ-ray pulses and the nuclear astrophysics involved. Full article
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Open AccessArticle The Brightest Light in Canada: The Canadian Light Source
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 4; doi:10.3390/qubs1010004
Received: 10 December 2016 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 24 March 2017 / Published: 31 March 2017
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Abstract
Over forty years in the making, and one of Canada’s largest scientific investments in those four decades, the Canadian Light Source (CLS), a third generation source of synchrotron light, was designed for high performance and flexibility and serves the diverse needs of the
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Over forty years in the making, and one of Canada’s largest scientific investments in those four decades, the Canadian Light Source (CLS), a third generation source of synchrotron light, was designed for high performance and flexibility and serves the diverse needs of the Canadian research community by providing brilliant light for applied and basic research programmes ranging from the far infrared to the hard X-ray regimes. Development of the scientific program at the CLS has been envisioned in four distinct phases. The first phase consists of the accelerator complex together with seven experimental facilities; the second phase adds six more experimental facilities and additional infrastructure to support them; the third phase adds seven more experimental facilities; and the fourth phase focuses on beamline and endstation upgrades, keeping the CLS as a state-of-the-art research centre. With the growth of a strong user community, the success of these experimental facilities will drive the future growth of the CLS. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Neutron Scattering at HIFAR—Glimpses of the Past
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 5; doi:10.3390/qubs1010005
Received: 23 February 2017 / Revised: 20 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 19 April 2017
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Abstract
This article attempts to give a description of neutron scattering down under for close on forty-six years. The early years describe the fledgling group buying parts and cobbling instruments together to its emergence as a viable neutron scattering group with up to ten
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This article attempts to give a description of neutron scattering down under for close on forty-six years. The early years describe the fledgling group buying parts and cobbling instruments together to its emergence as a viable neutron scattering group with up to ten working instruments. The second section covers the consolidation of this group, despite tough higher level management. The Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC) enquiry in 1985 and the Government decision not to replace the HIgh Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR), led to major expansion and upgrading of the existing neutron beam facilities during the 1990s. Finally, there were some smooth years of operation while other staff were preparing for the replacement reactor. It has concentrated on the instruments as they were built, modified, replaced with new ones, and upgraded at different times. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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Open AccessReview Neutron Sources at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 6; doi:10.3390/qubs1010006
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 23 March 2017 / Accepted: 28 March 2017 / Published: 21 April 2017
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Abstract
The IBR-2 reactor and IREN facility are the two main neutron sources at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. This contribution presents data on the IBR-2 reactor parameters before and after modernization. The general schemes of the IBR-2 reactor as well as of
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The IBR-2 reactor and IREN facility are the two main neutron sources at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics. This contribution presents data on the IBR-2 reactor parameters before and after modernization. The general schemes of the IBR-2 reactor as well as of the IREN facility are presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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Open AccessReview High Power Laser Facilities at the Kansai Photon Science Institute
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 7; doi:10.3390/qubs1010007
Received: 27 March 2017 / Revised: 26 May 2017 / Accepted: 30 May 2017 / Published: 7 June 2017
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Abstract
At the Kansai Photon Science Institute (KPSI, Kyoto, Japan), there are three unique high-power laser facilities. Here, we introduce the features of each facility and some experimental studies, which will be useful to users as a reference. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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Open AccessReview Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex IV: The Muon Facility
Quantum Beam Sci. 2017, 1(1), 11; doi:10.3390/qubs1010011
Received: 1 May 2017 / Revised: 31 May 2017 / Accepted: 8 June 2017 / Published: 15 June 2017
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (16274 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A muon experimental facility, known as the Muon Science Establishment (MUSE), is one of the user facilities at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, along with those for neutrons, hadrons, and neutrinos. The MUSE facility is integrated into the Materials and Life Science
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A muon experimental facility, known as the Muon Science Establishment (MUSE), is one of the user facilities at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex, along with those for neutrons, hadrons, and neutrinos. The MUSE facility is integrated into the Materials and Life Science Facility building in which a high-energy proton beam that is shared with a neutron experiment facility delivers a variety of muon beams for research covering diverse scientific fields. In this review, we present the current status of MUSE, which is still in the process of being developed into its fully fledged form. Full article
(This article belongs to the collection Facilities)
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