Next Article in Journal / Special Issue
Performance of Two Bioswales on Urban Runoff Management
Previous Article in Journal
A Novel Application of Photogrammetry for Retaining Wall Assessment
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Infrastructures 2017, 2(3), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures2030011

Factors Contributing to the Hydrologic Effectiveness of a Rain Garden Network (Cincinnati OH USA)

1
Research Hydrologist, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, ML443, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA
2
Hydrologist, United States Geological Survey, Michigan-Ohio Water Science Center, 6460 Busch Blvd. Suite 100, Columbus, OH 43229-1753, USA
3
National Research Council Postdoctoral Research Associate, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management research Laboratory, ML443, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268, USA
4
Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Postdoctoral Research Associate, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 3 August 2017 / Revised: 31 August 2017 / Accepted: 4 September 2017 / Published: 6 September 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Green Infrastructure for Sustainable Stormwater Management)
Full-Text   |   PDF [5514 KB, uploaded 6 September 2017]   |  

Abstract

Infiltrative rain gardens can add retention capacity to sewersheds, yet factors contributing to their capacity for detention and redistribution of stormwater runoff are dynamic and often unverified. Over a four-year period, we tracked whole-system water fluxes in a two-tier rain garden network and assessed near-surface hydrology and soil development across construction and operational phases. The monitoring data provided a quantitative basis for determining effectiveness of this stormwater control measure. Based on 233 monitored warm-season rainfall events, nearly half of total inflow volume was detained, with 90 percent of all events producing no flow to the combined sewer. For the events that did result in flow to the combined sewer system, the rain garden delayed flows for an average of 5.5 h. Multivariate analysis of hydrologic fluxes indicated that total event rainfall depth was a predominant hydrologic driver for network outflow during both phases, with average event intensity and daily evapotranspiration as additional, independent factors in regulating retention in the operational phase. Despite sediment loads that can clog the rooting zone, and overall lower-than-design infiltration rates, tradeoffs among soil profile development and hydrology apparently maintained relatively high overall retention effectiveness. Overall, our study identified factors relevant to regulation of retention capacity of a rain garden network. These factors may be generalizable, and guide improvement of new or existing rain garden designs. View Full-Text
Keywords: wastewater; combined sewer system; hydrologic monitoring; green infrastructure; stormwater detention wastewater; combined sewer system; hydrologic monitoring; green infrastructure; stormwater detention
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Shuster, W.D.; Darner, R.A.; Schifman, L.A.; Herrmann, D.L. Factors Contributing to the Hydrologic Effectiveness of a Rain Garden Network (Cincinnati OH USA). Infrastructures 2017, 2, 11.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Infrastructures EISSN 2412-3811 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top