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Vision 2017, 1(3), 18; doi:10.3390/vision1030018

Persistent Biases in Binocular Rivalry Dynamics within the Visual Field

Vanderbilt Vision Research Center and Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37240, USA
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Received: 28 April 2017 / Revised: 25 June 2017 / Accepted: 26 June 2017 / Published: 29 June 2017
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Abstract

Binocular rivalry is an important tool for measuring sensory eye dominance—the relative strength of sensory processing in an individual’s left and right eye. By dichoptically presenting images that lack corresponding visual features, one can induce perceptual alternations and measure the relative visibility of each eye’s image. Previous results indicate that observers demonstrate reliable preferences for several image features, and that these biases vary within the visual field. However, evidence about the persistence of these biases is mixed, with some suggesting they affect only the onset (i.e., first second) of rivalry, and others suggesting lasting effects during prolonged viewing. We directly investigated individuals’ rivalry biases for eye and color within the visual field and interestingly found results that mirrored the somewhat contradictory pattern in the literature. Each observer demonstrated idiosyncratic patterns of biases for both color and eye within the visual field, but consistent, prolonged biases only for the eye of presentation (sensory eye dominance, SED). Furthermore, the strength of eye biases predicted one’s performance on a stereoacuity task. This finding supports the idea that binocular rivalry and other binocular visual functions may rely on shared mechanisms, and emphasizes the importance of SED as a measure of binocular vision. View Full-Text
Keywords: binocular rivalry; bistable vision; individual differences; 3D vision binocular rivalry; bistable vision; individual differences; 3D vision
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

  • Externally hosted supplementary file 1
    Doi: 10.6084/m9.figshare.5116189
    Link: https://figshare.com/s/00e2200bd1af768df6e3
    Description: Link to our figshare repository for Experiment 1 data (now cited in the text).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Dieter, K.C.; Sy, J.L.; Blake, R. Persistent Biases in Binocular Rivalry Dynamics within the Visual Field. Vision 2017, 1, 18.

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