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J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk3010001

Low-Intensity Vibration Improves Muscle Healing in a Mouse Model of Laceration Injury

1
Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
2
Center for Wound Healing and Tissue Regeneration, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
3
Department of Biomedical Engineering, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 4 December 2017 / Revised: 12 December 2017 / Accepted: 15 December 2017 / Published: 21 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Muscle Damage and Regeneration)
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Abstract

Recovery from traumatic muscle injuries is typically prolonged and incomplete, leading to impaired muscle and joint function. We sought to determine whether mechanical stimulation via whole-body low-intensity vibration (LIV) could (1) improve muscle regeneration and (2) reduce muscle fibrosis following traumatic injury. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to a laceration of the gastrocnemius muscle and were treated with LIV (0.2 g at 90 Hz or 0.4 g at 45 Hz for 30 min/day) or non-LIV sham treatment (controls) for seven or 14 days. Muscle regeneration and fibrosis were assessed in hematoxylin and eosin or Masson’s trichrome stained muscle cryosections, respectively. Compared to non-LIV control mice, the myofiber cross-sectional area was larger in mice treated with each LIV protocol after 14 days of treatment. Minimum fiber diameter was also larger in mice treated with LIV of 90 Hz/0.2 g after 14 days of treatment. There was also a trend toward a reduction in collagen deposition after 14 days of treatment with 45 Hz/0.4 g (p = 0.059). These findings suggest that LIV may improve muscle healing by enhancing myofiber growth and reducing fibrosis. The LIV-induced improvements in muscle healing suggest that LIV may represent a novel therapeutic approach for improving the healing of traumatic muscle injuries. View Full-Text
Keywords: skeletal muscle injury; laceration; low-intensity vibration; muscle regeneration; fibrosis skeletal muscle injury; laceration; low-intensity vibration; muscle regeneration; fibrosis
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Corbiere, T.F.; Weinheimer-Haus, E.M.; Judex, S.; Koh, T.J. Low-Intensity Vibration Improves Muscle Healing in a Mouse Model of Laceration Injury. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2018, 3, 1.

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J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. EISSN 2411-5142 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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