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Genealogy, Volume 1, Issue 4 (December 2017)

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Open AccessArticle What’s in a Name? The Genealogy of Holocaust Identities
Genealogy 2017, 1(4), 19; doi:10.3390/genealogy1040019
Received: 7 September 2017 / Accepted: 27 September 2017 / Published: 6 October 2017
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Abstract
In this essay, I analyze the terminology used in the United States (U.S.) to refer to Jews who lived through the Holocaust as well as their descendants. This essay constitutes a first step in a project focused on re-conceptualizing Holocaust survivors and their
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In this essay, I analyze the terminology used in the United States (U.S.) to refer to Jews who lived through the Holocaust as well as their descendants. This essay constitutes a first step in a project focused on re-conceptualizing Holocaust survivors and their families through the lens of agency and victimization. Many children and, more recently, grandchildren of Jewish Holocaust survivors trace their genealogy to their parent’s or grandparent’s past, and self-identify through this experience. The specific terms and labels used to identify or self-identify reflect different kinds of assumptions as well as claims on how that particular past affects their present. My preliminary findings suggest a paradoxical inversion of victimization and agency in some of the terminology used to identify or self-identify survivors as well as children of survivors. Full article
Open AccessArticle Persons and Sovereigns in Ethical Thought
Genealogy 2017, 1(4), 21; doi:10.3390/genealogy1040021
Received: 18 August 2017 / Revised: 13 November 2017 / Accepted: 16 November 2017 / Published: 20 November 2017
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Abstract
Contemporary concepts of moral personhood prevent us from grappling effectively with contemporary social, political, and moral problems. One way to counter the power of such concepts is to trace their lineage and shifting political investments. This article presents a genealogy of personhood, focusing
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Contemporary concepts of moral personhood prevent us from grappling effectively with contemporary social, political, and moral problems. One way to counter the power of such concepts is to trace their lineage and shifting political investments. This article presents a genealogy of personhood, focusing on the crisis of both personhood and sovereignty in seventeenth-century England. It demonstrates the optionality of personhood for moral thinking and exposes personhood’s functions in political dividing practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Political Genealogy after Foucault)

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Open AccessBook Review Review-Discussion of Marco Solinas’s From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy
Genealogy 2017, 1(4), 20; doi:10.3390/genealogy1040020
Received: 26 September 2017 / Revised: 3 October 2017 / Accepted: 3 October 2017 / Published: 16 October 2017
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Abstract
The book I am discussing is the second book by Marco Solinas. He is the author of a book on Plato and Freud which first appeared in Italian (Solinas 2008) and then in an expanded version in German translation (Solinas 2012a)[...] Full article
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