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Batteries 2017, 3(4), 34; doi:10.3390/batteries3040034

Comparison among Constituent Phases in Superlattice Metal Hydride Alloys for Battery Applications

1
Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA
2
BASF/Battery Materials—Ovonic, 2983 Waterview Drive, Rochester Hills, MI 48309, USA
3
Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Andreas Jossen
Received: 14 September 2017 / Revised: 9 October 2017 / Accepted: 18 October 2017 / Published: 31 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nickel Metal Hydride Batteries 2017)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [3872 KB, uploaded 31 October 2017]   |  

Abstract

The effects of seven constituent phases—CeNi3, NdNi3, Nd2Ni7, Pr2Ni7, Sm5Ni19, Nd5Co19, and CaCu5—on the gaseous phase and electrochemical characteristics of a superlattice metal hydride alloy made by induction melting with a composition of Sm14La5.7Mg4.0Ni73Al3.3 were studied through a series of annealing experiments. With an increase in annealing temperature, the abundance of non-superlattice CaCu5 phase first decreases and then increases, which is opposite to the phase abundance evolution of Nd2Ni7—the phase with the best electrochemical performance. The optimal annealing condition for the composition in this study is 920 °C for 5 h. Extensive correlation studies reveal that the A2B7 phase demonstrates higher gaseous phase hydrogen storage and electrochemical discharge capacities and better battery performance in high-rate dischargeability, charge retention, and cycle life. Moreover, the hexagonal stacking structure is found to be more favorable than the rhombohedral structure. View Full-Text
Keywords: metal hydride (MH); nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) battery; hydrogen absorbing alloy; electrochemistry; superlattice alloy metal hydride (MH); nickel/metal hydride (Ni/MH) battery; hydrogen absorbing alloy; electrochemistry; superlattice alloy
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Young, K.-H.; Ouchi, T.; Nei, J.; Koch, J.M.; Lien, Y.-L. Comparison among Constituent Phases in Superlattice Metal Hydride Alloys for Battery Applications. Batteries 2017, 3, 34.

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