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Horticulturae 2017, 3(2), 30; doi:10.3390/horticulturae3020030

Soil Salinity: Effect on Vegetable Crop Growth. Management Practices to Prevent and Mitigate Soil Salinization

1
ICAAM— Instituto de Ciências Agrárias e Ambientais Mediterrânicas, Universidade de Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Apartado 94, 7006-554 Évora, Portugal
2
Departamento de Fitotecnia, Escola de Ciência Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Apartado 94, 7006-554 Évora, Portugal
3
Departamento de Engenharia Rural, Escola de Ciência Tecnologia, Universidade de Évora, Pólo da Mitra, Apartado 94, 7006-554 Évora, Portugal
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Arturo Alvino and Maria Isabel Freire Ribeiro Ferreira
Received: 11 January 2017 / Revised: 16 March 2017 / Accepted: 26 April 2017 / Published: 3 May 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Refining Irrigation Strategies in Horticultural Production)
View Full-Text   |   Download PDF [267 KB, uploaded 4 May 2017]

Abstract

Salinity is a major problem affecting crop production all over the world: 20% of cultivated land in the world, and 33% of irrigated land, are salt-affected and degraded. This process can be accentuated by climate change, excessive use of groundwater (mainly if close to the sea), increasing use of low-quality water in irrigation, and massive introduction of irrigation associated with intensive farming. Excessive soil salinity reduces the productivity of many agricultural crops, including most vegetables, which are particularly sensitive throughout the ontogeny of the plant. The salinity threshold (ECt) of the majority of vegetable crops is low (ranging from 1 to 2.5 dS m−1 in saturated soil extracts) and vegetable salt tolerance decreases when saline water is used for irrigation. The objective of this review is to discuss the effects of salinity on vegetable growth and how management practices (irrigation, drainage, and fertilization) can prevent soil and water salinization and mitigate the adverse effects of salinity. View Full-Text
Keywords: vegetable crops; salinity threshold; crop salt tolerance; ion imbalance; irrigation; drainage; fertilization vegetable crops; salinity threshold; crop salt tolerance; ion imbalance; irrigation; drainage; fertilization
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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MDPI and ACS Style

Machado, R.M.A.; Serralheiro, R.P. Soil Salinity: Effect on Vegetable Crop Growth. Management Practices to Prevent and Mitigate Soil Salinization. Horticulturae 2017, 3, 30.

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