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J. Fungi 2016, 2(4), 26; doi:10.3390/jof2040026

New Horizons in Antifungal Therapy

1
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
2
Department of Medicine/Infectious Diseases, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC 27710, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Maurizio Del Poeta
Received: 18 July 2016 / Revised: 19 September 2016 / Accepted: 20 September 2016 / Published: 2 October 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Antifungal Drug Discovery)
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Abstract

Recent investigations have yielded both profound insights into the mechanisms required by pathogenic fungi for virulence within the human host, as well as novel potential targets for antifungal therapeutics. Some of these studies have resulted in the identification of novel compounds that act against these pathways and also demonstrate potent antifungal activity. However, considerable effort is required to move from pre-clinical compound testing to true clinical trials, a necessary step toward ultimately bringing new drugs to market. The rising incidence of invasive fungal infections mandates continued efforts to identify new strategies for antifungal therapy. Moreover, these life-threatening infections often occur in our most vulnerable patient populations. In addition to finding completely novel antifungal compounds, there is also a renewed effort to redirect existing drugs for use as antifungal agents. Several recent screens have identified potent antifungal activity in compounds previously indicated for other uses in humans. Together, the combined efforts of academic investigators and the pharmaceutical industry is resulting in exciting new possibilities for the treatment of invasive fungal infections. View Full-Text
Keywords: amphotericin; polyene; azole; echinocandin; flucytosine; aspergillosis; candidiasis; cryptococcosis; fungal infection; mycosis amphotericin; polyene; azole; echinocandin; flucytosine; aspergillosis; candidiasis; cryptococcosis; fungal infection; mycosis
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. (CC BY 4.0).

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Pianalto, K.M.; Alspaugh, J.A. New Horizons in Antifungal Therapy. J. Fungi 2016, 2, 26.

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