Next Issue
Previous Issue

Table of Contents

Sinusitis, Volume 2, Issue 3 (September 2017)

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Readerexternal link to open them.
View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle Multimodal Frequency Treatment for Facial Pain Caused by Chronic Rhinosinusitis: A Pilot Study
Sinusitis 2017, 2(3), 5; doi:10.3390/sinusitis2030005
Received: 1 August 2017 / Revised: 24 August 2017 / Accepted: 29 August 2017 / Published: 4 September 2017
PDF Full-text (2593 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common disease that affects over 200 million patients worldwide. CRS often presents with facial pain, which is considered an important criterion for the diagnosis of CRS. A single-arm clinical study was designed to test the effect of simultaneous
[...] Read more.
Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common disease that affects over 200 million patients worldwide. CRS often presents with facial pain, which is considered an important criterion for the diagnosis of CRS. A single-arm clinical study was designed to test the effect of simultaneous high (1 MHz) and low frequencies (70–80 Hz) on facial pain in 14 CRS patients at the Sarah Bush Lincoln Health Center, Mattoon, IL, USA. We used two quality of life (QOL) instruments to test the effect of multimodal frequencies on patients suffering from CRS: the Brief Pain Inventory Short Form (BPI-SF), and the Sino-Nasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22). Mean BPI-SF severity scores improved by 0.80 points (Wilcoxon rank sum test p < 0.01) in all 14 patients. In patients with baseline facial pain (n = 9), the scores improved by an average of 1.5 (p < 0.01) points in the pain severity domain and by 1.4 points in the pain interference domain. Additionally, the mean improvement in SNOT-22 scores was 14.11 (p < 0.05), which is above the minimal clinically-important difference (MCID) of nine points. Our pilot study indicates that multimodal vibration frequencies applied over the facial sinuses reduce pain, possibly through the reduction of the inflammatory response and modulation of the pain receptors. This study suggests the possibility that combining different frequencies could have an enhanced effect on reducing CRS-related facial pain. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessOpinion Pediatric Chronic Sinusitis: What Art Thou?
Sinusitis 2017, 2(3), 6; doi:10.3390/sinusitis2030006
Received: 13 September 2017 / Revised: 14 September 2017 / Accepted: 14 September 2017 / Published: 18 September 2017
PDF Full-text (151 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pediatric chronic sinusitis has been re-termed, pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis, largely following the adult nomenclature. However, other large areas of medical management of the process have remained largely uninvestigated. This opinion piece discusses the gaps in our current knowledge of pediatric rhinosinusitis pathophysiology and
[...] Read more.
Pediatric chronic sinusitis has been re-termed, pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis, largely following the adult nomenclature. However, other large areas of medical management of the process have remained largely uninvestigated. This opinion piece discusses the gaps in our current knowledge of pediatric rhinosinusitis pathophysiology and limitations of current management protocols. Full article
Back to Top